Anthropology Courses

ANT
100
Hours
3
Intro To Anthropology

This course introduces students to the subfields of anthropology and demonstrates the benefits of a holistic approach to understanding globalization, multiculturalism, and cultural diversity. The concepts of evolution, human prehistory, language, and culture are explored as well as the diversity of human cultural patterns, including variations in marriage, kinship, and religion. SB Credit.

ANT
102
Hours
3
Intro Cultural Anthropology

An introduction to the discipline of cultural anthropology, the branch of anthropology that examines the rules and behaviors of contemporary human cultures. The course will demonstrate the importance of a holistic approach to understanding human diversity, and compare and contrast the various developments cultures use to tackle the universal problems of human living. SB Credit.

ANT
103
Hours
3
Discoveries In Archaeology

This course examines the major archaeological discoveries of the last two centuries that have led to significant insight about the nature of human organization. Not only will some of the broader cultural patterns in human prehistory be explored such as the origins of writing, religion, art, calendar systems, agriculture, and cities, but we will also learn about several remarkable archaeological sites and phenomena, including Stonehenge, the pyramids of Egypt, upper Paleolithic cave paintings, Machu Picchu and many other impressive achievements of the past.

ANT
106
Hours
3
Indians Of North America

Comprehensive overview of the prehistory, history, and modern day cultural diversity of Native Americans throughout North America. Historical and technological developments of different native groups are explored including changes as a result of European contact and the more recent attempts to revitalize Native American culture.

ANT
107
Hours
3
Intro To Archaeology

Overview of the methods archaeologists use to study prehistoric cultures and an introduction to the study of human culture over the past two million years.

ANT
113
Hours
3
Indians Of Deep South

Introduction to the Native Americans of Alabama and their nearby neighbors. Focuses on describing and explaining lifeways of indigenous peoples using ethnographic, ethnohistoric, and archaeological studies.

ANT
150
Hours
3
Evolution for Everyone

This course is designed to open students minds to what evolution is and how it applies to all life. Toward that end, we will view lectures given by evolutionary scholars from varied institutions and disciplines.

ANT
208
Hours
3
Anthropology of Sex

This course is an introduction to human sexuality from a biocultural perspective with emphases on sexual diversity and pluralism and psychosexual evolution. It traces the evolution of human sociosexual behavior, including human sexual physiology, preproductive strategies; contemporary courtship, mating and marital patterns; gender differences in the brain and behavior; and sexual and social emotions. It compares the sexuality of humans to non-humans, especially to that of other primates. It also discusses human sexuality from the perspective of different cultures throughout the world. Among other topics, the course will address the psychobiocultural dimensions and implications of attraction, fidelity sex techniques, gender, incest, homosexuality and transexuality and sexually transmitted diseases.

ANT
210
Hours
3
Language And Culture

Human activity in its linguistic, cultural, and social contexts; interrelationships between culture and natural language; and the influences of language and culture on thought and behavior.

ANT
215
Hours
3
Anthropology in Movies and Fiction

Compares portrayals of anthropologists and core anthropological issues in movies and fiction to anthropological perspectives and scholarship.

ANT
216
Hours
3
Ethnographic Cinema

This course is a survey of the history of ethnographic cinema. Students in this class will learn this history by viewing important ethnographic films and by discussing and critiquing the visual representation of culture and society in anthropology.

ANT
250
Hours
3
Issues in Anthropology

This course is a flexible listing designed to cover specific topics in anthropology not already offered through an existing course. It is similar to ANT 450 Problems in Anthropology, but allows students with less exposure to ANT or the particular issues addressed an opportunity to learn more at a more introductory level.

ANT
269
Hours
6-12
Field Archaeology

In this course students and the supervising archaeologists work together as a research team on an archaeological excavation. Students learn basic excavation techniques and skills: how to identify, map, measure, recover, record, and process archaeological data. At the conclusion of the course, students will have excavation experience and insights into the archaeological research process.

ANT
270
Hours
0-3
Introduction to Biological Anthropology

An introduction to human evolution, biological variation, and adaptation, from the deep past to the present, with a special focus on the biocultural foundations of human nature. Students will become familiar with cutting edge evidence from the fossil record and molecular biology about our origins and prehistory, and how humans today respond to our widely varying physical and social environments.

ANT
275
Hours
3
Race, Ethnicity Human, and Variation

Historical and contemporary perspectives on human biological diversity, including the concepts of race, ethnicity, adaptation, and some of the social implications of these views.

ANT
311
Hours
3
Population, Health & Human Origin

Focuses on the relationships among human ecology, population growth, health and disease, and adaptation in modern and prehistoric societies. Explores the origins of infectious diseases, emphasizing the principles of epidemiology and evolution of pathogens.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 270
ANT
312
Hours
3
Non-Human Primates

This course is an introductory survey of the world's living non-human primates. The focus is on the taxonomy, anatomy, behavior, ecology and cognition of our closest living relatives. It is intended both as a starting point for further coursework in primate behavior and as a survey course for non-science students.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 270 or permission of the instructor.
ANT
317
Hours
3
Anth-Modern Life

Application of anthropological theories and findings to selected issues and problems of living in complex industrialized societies. Offered according to demand.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 102
ANT
318
Hours
3
Ancient Cities & Empires

A comparative study of ancient cities and empires with examples from the Old and New Worlds.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 103 or ANT 107
ANT
319
Hours
3
Ancient New World Civilization

An introduction to the ancient civilizations of Mesoamerica and South America. Explores the development of economic and political institutions as well as hieroglyphic texts, art styles, and religious rites.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 107 or permission of the instructor.
ANT
368
Hours
3
Southeastern Archaeology

Origin and development of pre-Columbian and early historic cultures of the Southeast. Offered according to demand.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 107
ANT
401
Hours
3
Theory and Method in Linguistic Anthropology

Scientific study of natural language, phonology, grammar, lexicon, meaning and the role of linguistics in anthropological research.

ANT
402
Hours
3
Gender Ethnicity & Health

Explores the gendered, ethnic, cultural, and class dimensions that underlie the patterning of disease and illness worldwide, with attention to the long-term health effects of racism, sexism and poverty. Topics include reproductive and sexual health, obesity, body image, HIV/AIDS, mental illness, homelessness, and more.

Prerequisite(s): Either ANT 100 or ANT 102 & 3 additional hours, or consent of instructor.
ANT
403
Hours
3
Anthropology is Elemental: Teaching Anthropology in Primary and Secondary Settings

This course is an introduction to teaching anthropology at the primary and secondary levels. It is a service-learning course, which means that all students will serve as instructors in a local anthropology course offered in the Tuscaloosa area. This course will expose students to applied anthropology through teaching the anthropological perspective via an activity-based four-subfield curriculum in conjunction with local elementary schools, after-school programs, or similar community partners. These programs will be taught by teams, and each student will be responsible for attending weekly course meetings, developing curricular material and implementing it in a classroom setting, and co-teaching with other students.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 102, ANT 107, ANT 210 and ANT 270
ANT
405
Hours
3
Culture, Mind, and Behavior

An examination of how culture influences individual thought, emotion, and behavior, and how culture is shaped by individual psychology. Topics include: models of culture; culture and visual perception; culture and personality; culture and mental health; as well as other topics.

ANT
408
Hours
3
Ancient Mexican Civilization

Survey of the origins and development of ancient civilizations in Mexico.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 107
ANT
409
Hours
3
Ancient Maya Civilization

Ancient Maya civilizations in Mexico and Central America from the earliest inhabitants until the Spanish Conquest.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 107
ANT
411
Hours
3
Culture, Health, & Healing

A cross-cultural overview of medical systems, and the health, illness, and healing experiences within them. Patients and healers will be studied through the lens of etiology, help seeking, diagnosis and treatment. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): Either ANT 100 or ANT 102 & 3 additional hours, or consent of instructor.
ANT
412
Hours
3
Peoples Of Europe

A review of selected aspects of the customs, social systems, and cultures of European societies. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

ANT
413
Hours
3
Peoples Of Latin Amer

A review of selected aspects of Latin American social systems and cultures. Topics include social structure, ethnicity, economics, material culture, gender roles, religion, sports, and political systems. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): Either ANT 100 or ANT 102 & 3 additional hours, or consent of instructor.
ANT
417
Hours
3
Peoples Of Asia

A review of selected aspects of the customs, social systems, and cultures of South Asian societies.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 102
ANT
418
Hours
3
Dev Non-West Cultures

Theoretical and descriptive study of social change and development in non-Western societies. Major emphasis is placed on the effects of change on indigenous institutions. Both ethnographic and theoretical literature are examined.

ANT
419
Hours
3
Myth, Ritual, And Magic

Survey of the anthropological literature on religion, including such topics as myth, ritual, magic, witchcraft, totemism, shamanism, and trance states. Offered according to demand. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 102 or REL 100
ANT
421
Hours
3
Ethnography

Students work with University Libraries to develop research to address changes in information technology and the impact of such changes for UA students. Emphasizes the research design process as practiced by professional, applied anthropologists, including communicating roles and expectations with client stakeholders, developing testable hypotheses, operationalizing variables, and determining project scope, timeline, and budget.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hrs of Anthropology or permission from instructor
ANT
424
Hours
3
Cultural Resource Management

This course is an overview of Cultural Resource Management archaeology, including the historical background and development of the field, the legal and regulatory framework to CRM archaeology, the methodologies and techniques employed, and how the legislative requirements are implemented at the federal, state, and local levels. Students will learn how to craft and submit proposals, develop and manage budgets, design and implement fieldwork, conduct and supervise data analysis, and how to author and submit reports. Upon completion of this course, students will be prepared for entering a career in CRM archaeology.

ANT
426
Hours
3
Archaeology of East North America

Examination of the origins and developments of pre-Columbian and early historic cultures of eastern North America.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 107
ANT
431
Hours
1-3
Readings In Anth

Honors readings for seniors and graduate students. Offered with permission of instructor only. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.

ANT
432
Hours
1-3
Readings In Anthropology

Honors readings for seniors and graduate students. Offered with permission of instructor only. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.

ANT
436
Hours
3
Social Structure

Social organization and structure, social life and institutions (especially in non-literate societies), kinship, descent groups, marriage, residence, and local group composition. Offered every third semester.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 102
ANT
438
Hours
3
Anthropology of Art

The course views the art that societies past and present produce; it explores culture, creativity, and human beings' distinctive compulsion to make decorative objects.

Prerequisite(s): At least 6 hours of ANT courses, including ANT 102; OR permission of instructor
ANT
439
Hours
3
Topics Anthropology Religion

An examination of contemporary issues and topics in the anthropology of religion.

ANT
440
Hours
3
Culture

A selective review of past and contemporary concepts, theories, and methodological approaches adopted by cultural anthropologists. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

ANT
441
Hours
3
Documenting Justice I

Interdisciplinary course in ethnographic filmmaking, focusing particularly on analyzing the many dimensions of culture and social experience. Students produce a short documentary film on a story of justice or injustice in Alabama. Application and permission of instructor required.

ANT
442
Hours
3
Documenting Justice II

Continuation of ANT 441.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 441
ANT
444
Hours
3
Anthropology And Cemeteries

Using approaches developed in the discipline of anthropology and, more particularly, in the subfield of archaeology, an exploration of the different ways in which local cemeteries can yield information on cultural, societal, and historical matters. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

ANT
445
Hours
3
Historical Archaeology

This course is a survey of the method and theory of the discipline of historical archaeology. Focusing particularly on the historical archaeology of North America, this course reviews the development of the field, considers the related fields of colonial archaeology and the archaeology of the contemporary, and examines what distinguishes historical archaeology within the broader discipline.

ANT
450
Hours
3
Probs In Anthropology

Devoted to issues not covered in other courses. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.

ANT
451
Hours
1-6
Undergraduate Research

Introduction to independent anthropological research with a focus on constructing testable hypotheses, selecting variables, measuring attributes, recording data, making interpretations and writing and presenting results.

ANT
460
Hours
3
Anthropology and Museums

Examines the historical connections between anthropology and natural history museums in the United States. Explores the present operation of such museums and develops exhibits based on collection studies.

ANT
462
Hours
3
Ancient Andean Civilizations

This course examines the cultures of the Andes in South America. It focuses on the rise of civilizations, cities, and empires in the Andes. The course also investigates the emergence, growth, and conquest of the largest indigenous empire in the Americas through a critical reading of archaeological, ethnohistorical, and popular accounts of the Inkas. Throughout this course, students will learn how the cultural practices of the contemporary Andes are still influenced by Inka values and institutions, and how the current Andean political landscape emerged from the dramatic historical process through which the Inka Empire was conquered and disassembled. The course interrogates the dynamic interplay of history, power, and identity within the Andean world, introducing students to the general theoretical interpretations that may be derived from particular ancient societies. The first part of the course analyzes current empirical evidence and theoretical perspectives on how Andean people shaped their environment, built impressive cities, and forged unique religious traditions. The second part of the course emphasizes how the Inkas produced and imagined their empire, as well as its role within the universe. Attention will be given to a comparison of the economic, institutional, and religious structures that undergirded concepts of social authority and political sovereignty within Andean societies, and how these concepts were transformed into the foundations of the Inka Empire. The third part of the course examines how Spanish conquest and colonization transformed the Andean world. Emphasis will be placed on the clash between Spanish and indigenous ideologies and political representations, with particular focus on how this clash fostered the production of new kinds of social classes throughout the Americas. In sum, the course is an intensive introduction to Andean civilizations, while allowing for the discussion of broader anthropological theories regarding the religion, empires, environmental transformation, social class, and the sociopolitical production of history. This course has been designed to expose students to different anthropological and historical perspectives on the indigenous Andes, Inka imperialism, and Spanish colonization. These perspectives include primary sources (Spanish and indigenous chronicles), archaeological accounts, and historical renderings. Lectures and discussions will also focus on how architectural, aesthetic, and narrative representations of Andean peoples have been mobilized for political purposes within contemporary contexts in Perú, and more broadly. In each class, the instructor will provide a critical overview of the material, select students will be expected to comment on the readings, and then all students will participate in a discussion about salient issues within the readings.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 103 or ANT 107
ANT
465
Hours
3
Lithic Analysis

Introduction to the basics of analysis of stone tools, their manufacture, and their use by means of microscopic and macroscopic approaches.

ANT
466
Hours
3
Laboratory Methods Archaeology

This class is a “hands-on” course in archaeological laboratory methods and most useful for anthropology majors/minors. Students will read about different kinds of analyses, and then put theory into practice by classifying and analyzing prehistoric artifacts. Students will learn how to build interpretations of the past by using artifact assemblages, how to discriminate between reliable and less reliable information, and collaborate in group activities.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 103 or ANT 107
ANT
467
Hours
3
Methods Prehistoric Iconography

An exploration of the concepts and methods used by prehistoric archaeologists to impute meanings in representational art.

ANT
468
Hours
3
Ceramics for the Archaeologist

Ceramics are the most ubiquitous and variable materials on many archaeological sites and, as such, they offer archaeologists a vast amount of information about the past. In this class, we approach ceramics from the perspective of research questions, and investigate how analytical techniques can help address them. The class also has a large practical component. Students will conduct analyses on collections and present their findings at the end of the class. This course is meant to provide a framework for developing hypotheses, methods and skills directly applicable to senior projects, MA theses, and Ph.D. dissertations.

Prerequisite(s): This is a course about archaeological research, therefore, it is restricted to undergraduates that have ceramic collections that they want to study as part of a senior or honor thesis. Undergraduate prerequisites for this course include 1) permission of the instructor, 2)12 hours in anthropology, and 3) ANT 107 "Introduction to Archaeology
ANT
471
Hours
3
Fossil Humans and Evolution

Survey of the discoveries, methods, and theories that provide the background for modern research in macroevolution. Offered according to demand.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 270
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: banner sync
ANT
473
Hours
4
Human Osteology

Detailed introduction to human osteology emphasizing the identification of fragmentary remains and the criteria for determination of age, sex, and race. Two hours- lecture, two hours- laboratory. Offered according to demand.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 270, and a "C" average.
ANT
474
Hours
3
Neuroanthropology

This course provides an introduction to evolutionary and biocultural approaches within anthropology to the central and peripheral nervous systems and their interconnections. Topics include the evolution of the brain; how culture and social structure shape the brain, its development, and its activity; and anthropological perspectives on connections among culture, behavior, brain, mind, and body.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 270 or BSC 300 or PY 413
ANT
475
Hours
3
Biology, Culture, & Evolution

An introduction to the biocultural and evolutionary bases of human adaptability. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 270
ANT
476
Hours
3
Nutritional Anthropology

Introduction to anthropological inquiries in nutrition (including food habits, food systems, and dietary variability) from a cross-cultural perspective. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

ANT
478
Hours
3
Anthro of Human Development

Health culturally competent socialized adults and mature physical forms arise from a developmental process with evolutionary, biological, social and cultural dimensions. We survey child/human development from an anthropological perspective, considering interactons across levels of analysis from genes to culture.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 OR ANT 270
ANT
479
Hours
3
Human Paleopathology

Course investigates skeletal pathology and trauma. Topics included: 1. Understanding disease processes, 2. Distinguishing accidental and violent trauma on bone, 3. Recognizing the following conditions in skeletal remains: congential anomalies, circulatory disorders, joint diseases, infectious diseases, metabolic diseases, skeletal dysplasias, neoplastic conditions, diseases of the dentition and other conditions. Students will inventory, evaluate and analyze sets of human skeletal remains for pathology and trauma and complete final reports on those remains.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 270
ANT
480
Hours
3
Advanced Evolutionary Studies & Big Questions

This course is the capstone to the Evolutionary Studies minor and should be taken in the final semester of the program. This course meets in conjunction with "Evolution for Everyone," the minor introductory course to the minor, to revisit the basic principles and application of evolutionary theory. These courses are team-taught by faculty from around the University and integrate the Alabama Lectures of Life's Evolution series, so they are likely to be different for you in both iterations. The course will review applications of evolutionary theory in the natural, social, and applied sciences and in the humanities. Additionally, you will conduct or complete a culminating project during the first half of the semester. During the second half of the semester, you will present this to the class and submit an article based on your project for publication in a peer-reviewed science journal.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 150; BSC 220; & ANT 270, PHL 380 OR GEO 102