New College is the University of Alabama’s commitment to providing personalized higher education for those students who need and desire that special attention. It is an interdisciplinary liberal arts program where students craft individualized courses of study consistent with their interests, aptitude, temperament and skills. Each student, with the assistance of a faculty mentor, builds a course of study that includes traditional coursework, community-based learning, undergraduate research opportunities,and self-directed study.

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Programs

The major objective of New College is to create an opportunity for a highly individualized education that allows students to draw from the resources of all University classes and faculty. The New College curriculum has two principle elements. The first element is the depth study, which is the student’s area of concentration. Students are also expected to develop their own independent studies and out-of-class learning experiences to enhance their understanding of the subject of their depth studies and to add to their learning experiences. The second element is the general education component, which provides students with opportunities to integrate humanities, social sciences and natural sciences beyond their depth study. The interdisciplinary experience in New College affords excellent preparation for students with ambitions for graduate study or for professional careers in various areas, including law and medicine.

Faculty

Director
  • Adams, Natalie G.
Assistant Director
  • Miller, John C. H.
Professors
  • Adams, Natalie G.
  • Roach, Catherine M.
  • Trost, Theodore L.
Associate Professors
  • Cherry, Julia A.
  • Dewar, Andrew R.
  • Galbraith, Marysia H.
  • Spears, Ellen G.
  • Steinberg, Michael K.
Assistant Professors
  • Brickman, Barbara J.
  • Callander, Adrienne
  • Willis, Vincent
Professors emeriti
  • Blewitt, Harry L, PhD
  • Passerini, Edward M, PhD
  • Rosenberg, Jerome, PhD
Instructors
  • Bertolaet, Emma J.
  • Caputo, Jennifer L.
  • Colburn, Kimberly R.
  • Espy-Brown, Amanda S.
  • Hopson, Holland G.
  • Pirkle, Amy L.

Courses

NEW
100
Hours
1-2
Intro Interdisc Integratv Stdy

Designed to help New College students become more informed about the University and about New College so that they may maximize their opportunities in their undergraduate programs through New College. Enrollment is limited to New College students.

NEW
120
Hours
1
Inclusive Leadership Through Sustained Dialogue

In an increasingly globalized world, leaders need the skills to resolve conflict across difference. Sustained Dialogue is a five-stage dialogue-to-action model that requires participants to take the time to focus first on transforming change-blocking relationships, and then on solving problems. This course will explore the theory behind this innovative model and ultimately consider how Sustained Dialogue applies to visions for positive change at the University of Alabama. Participants will receive an introduction to the Sustained Dialogue model and then meet in dialogue groups weekly to work through the 5 stages to address specific issues on campus.

Prerequisite(s): NONE
NEW
122
Hours
2
Academic Potential

This course will help students develop practical and efficient strategies for learning in order to succeed in college. Students will learn skills to improve note taking, listening, textbook reading, and time management; as well as methods to reduce text anxiety and improve concentration. Discussion of campus resources and learning styles will also be included in this course.

Prerequisite(s): none
NEW
201
Hours
1
Recreation For Life

In this course (designed by the student and his or her advisor using the out-of-class learning contract), the student agrees to participate in some form of physical activity that might result in a lifelong interest. These include jogging, swimming, cycling, etc. This course will frequently include a reading requirement relating to the activity.

NEW
211
Hours
4
Perspectives in the Humanities

Introductory course in the humanities (art, literature, music, etc.) with a focus on problem solving, risk taking and communication. Human behavior and writing skills are stressed.

NEW
212
Hours
4
Creativity

This interdisciplinary seminar uses creativity as an organizing principle. Human culture and consciousness are explored through reading, writing, the arts, projects, studios, and discussion.

NEW
213
Hours
4
Honors Creativity

This honors interdisciplinary seminar uses creativity as an organizing principle. Human culture and consciousness are explored through reading, writing, the arts, projects, studios, and discussion.

Prerequisite(s): None
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: None
NEW
215
Hours
4
Perspec. on Env. Literature

Considers perspectives on environmental studies within the humanities by examining key texts of environmental literature.

NEW
223
Hours
1
Mcnair Scholar'S Seminar

To provide knowledge and skills in a variety of areas to strengthen personal, academic, and research competencies vital to success in graduate programs.

NEW
226
Hours
4
Organic Farming

An intensive, hands-on course in organic farming taught at a local working farm. Covers the basics of organic farming while also addressing questions about organic versus industrial agriculture models in relation to current environmental problems and solutions.

NEW
230
Hours
4
Environmental Studies

This course engages students in the study of environmental problems and solutions. It includes an examination of fundamental assumptions about the ethical human-nature relation and of how to value nature. The approach is interdisciplinary, drawing on the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences.

NEW
237
Hours
4
Cooperation & Conflict

This seminar explores cooperation and conflict in human societies; all that we do or fail to do in living together effectively. Students investigate and seek solutions for contemporary social problems.

NEW
238
Hours
4
Honors: Coop. & Conflict

This honors seminar explores cooperation and conflict in human societies – all that we do or fail to do in living together effectively. Students investigate and seek solutions for contemporary social problems.

NEW
243
Hours
4
Interdisciplinary Sciences

This seminar demonstrates how the nature of the laboratory experience plays an essential role in the understanding and advancement of science. Several multidisciplinary experiments are performed in geology, chemistry, physics, and biology.

NEW
270
Hours
3
Leader Soc Justice Activism

No description available.

NEW
273
Hours
4
Social Issues & Ethics

This seminar is designed to develop an awareness of the methodologies and concerns of the social sciences as they relate to ethical inquiry. The primary focus is on the nature of inquiry and models for the analysis of ethical issues confronting the modern world. Students will explore the complexity of moral dilemmas and effective societal responses to competing moral obligations in the areas of health care, socio-economic disparities, affirmative action, immigration, and racism.

NEW
300
Hours
3
Outdoor Leadership

The goal of this course is to prepare students to successfully and safely plan and lead small group excursions into wilderness, backcountry, and front-country outdoor areas using various outdoor recreational activities as a medium. There will also be an emphasis placed on teaching technique and presentation skills as students will be required to present information to the class.

Prerequisite(s): none
NEW
310
Hours
1-15
Independent Study

A student desiring to pursue an academic interest for which no University class is available may plan his or her own "course" through Out-of-Class Learning. A contract, or agreement, with New College is prepared by the student, in which the student identifies a variety of features of the proposed study: its goals and objectives, the methodology and resources to be employed in the attempt to meet the goals and objectives, and the procedure by which the study will be evaluated upon its completion. The process of preparing the contract should be in cooperation with the New College office, from which contract forms may be procured, and with a faculty member or other authority qualified to assist and assess the study. Credit hours awarded for Out-of-Class Learning are available, relative to the breadth or depth of the study, and subject to approval of the advisor to the study and director of the New College.

NEW
311
Hours
1-12
Independent Study

A student desiring to pursue an academic interest for which no University class is available may plan his or her own "course" through Out-of-Class Learning. A contract, or agreement, with New College is prepared by the student, in which the student identifies a variety of features of the proposed study: its goals and objectives, the methodology and resources to be employed in the attempt to meet the goals and objectives, and the procedure by which the study will be evaluated upon its completion. The process of preparing the contract should be in cooperation with the New College office, from which contract forms may be procured, and with a faculty member or other authority qualified to assist and assess the study. Credit hours awarded for Out-of-Class Learning are available, relative to the breadth or depth of the study, and subject to approval of the advisor to the study and director of the New College.

NEW
312
Hours
1-12
Independent Study

A student desiring to pursue an academic interest for which no University class is available may plan his or her own "course" through Out-of-Class Learning. A contract, or agreement, with New College is prepared by the student, in which the student identifies a variety of features of the proposed study: its goals and objectives, the methodology and resources to be employed in the attempt to meet the goals and objectives, and the procedure by which the study will be evaluated upon its completion. The process of preparing the contract should be in cooperation with the New College office, from which contract forms may be procured, and with a faculty member or other authority qualified to assist and assess the study. Credit hours awarded for Out-of-Class Learning are available, relative to the breadth or depth of the study, and subject to approval of the advisor to the study and director of the New College.

NEW
313
Hours
1-12
Independent Study

A student desiring to pursue an academic interest for which no University class is available may plan his or her own "course" through Out-of-Class Learning. A contract, or agreement, with New College is prepared by the student, in which the student identifies a variety of features of the proposed study: its goals and objectives, the methodology and resources to be employed in the attempt to meet the goals and objectives, and the procedure by which the study will be evaluated upon its completion. The process of preparing the contract should be in cooperation with the New College office, from which contract forms may be procured, and with a faculty member or other authority qualified to assist and assess the study. Credit hours awarded for Out-of-Class Learning are available, relative to the breadth or depth of the study, and subject to approval of the advisor to the study and director of the New College.

NEW
314
Hours
1-12
Independent Study

A student desiring to pursue an academic interest for which no University class is available may plan his or her own "course" through Out-of-Class Learning. A contract, or agreement, with New College is prepared by the student, in which the student identifies a variety of features of the proposed study: its goals and objectives, the methodology and resources to be employed in the attempt to meet the goals and objectives, and the procedure by which the study will be evaluated upon its completion. The process of preparing the contract should be in cooperation with the New College office, from which contract forms may be procured, and with a faculty member or other authority qualified to assist and assess the study. Credit hours awarded for Out-of-Class Learning are available, relative to the breadth or depth of the study, and subject to approval of the advisor to the study and director of the New College.

NEW
315
Hours
1-12
Independent Study

A student desiring to pursue an academic interest for which no University class is available may plan his or her own "course" through Out-of-Class Learning. A contract, or agreement, with New College is prepared by the student, in which the student identifies a variety of features of the proposed study: its goals and objectives, the methodology and resources to be employed in the attempt to meet the goals and objectives, and the procedure by which the study will be evaluated upon its completion. The process of preparing the contract should be in cooperation with the New College office, from which contract forms may be procured, and with a faculty member or other authority qualified to assist and assess the study. Credit hours awarded for Out-of-Class Learning are available, relative to the breadth or depth of the study, and subject to approval of the advisor to the study and director of the New College.

NEW
316
Hours
1-12
Independent Study

A student desiring to pursue an academic interest for which no University class is available may plan his or her own "course" through Out-of-Class Learning. A contract, or agreement, with New College is prepared by the student, in which the student identifies a variety of features of the proposed study: its goals and objectives, the methodology and resources to be employed in the attempt to meet the goals and objectives, and the procedure by which the study will be evaluated upon its completion. The process of preparing the contract should be in cooperation with the New College office, from which contract forms may be procured, and with a faculty member or other authority qualified to assist and assess the study. Credit hours awarded for Out-of-Class Learning are available, relative to the breadth or depth of the study, and subject to approval of the advisor to the study and director of the New College.

NEW
317
Hours
1-12
Independent Study

A student desiring to pursue an academic interest for which no University class is available may plan his or her own "course" through Out-of-Class Learning. A contract, or agreement, with New College is prepared by the student, in which the student identifies a variety of features of the proposed study: its goals and objectives, the methodology and resources to be employed in the attempt to meet the goals and objectives, and the procedure by which the study will be evaluated upon its completion. The process of preparing the contract should be in cooperation with the New College office, from which contract forms may be procured, and with a faculty member or other authority qualified to assist and assess the study. Credit hours awarded for Out-of-Class Learning are available, relative to the breadth or depth of the study, and subject to approval of the advisor to the study and director of the New College.

NEW
318
Hours
1-12
Independent Study

A student desiring to pursue an academic interest for which no University class is available may plan his or her own "course" through Out-of-Class Learning. A contract, or agreement, with New College is prepared by the student, in which the student identifies a variety of features of the proposed study: its goals and objectives, the methodology and resources to be employed in the attempt to meet the goals and objectives, and the procedure by which the study will be evaluated upon its completion. The process of preparing the contract should be in cooperation with the New College office, from which contract forms may be procured, and with a faculty member or other authority qualified to assist and assess the study. Credit hours awarded for Out-of-Class Learning are available, relative to the breadth or depth of the study, and subject to approval of the advisor to the study and director of the New College.

NEW
319
Hours
1-12
Independent Study

A student desiring to pursue an academic interest for which no University class is available may plan his or her own "course" through Out-of-Class Learning. A contract, or agreement, with New College is prepared by the student, in which the student identifies a variety of features of the proposed study: its goals and objectives, the methodology and resources to be employed in the attempt to meet the goals and objectives, and the procedure by which the study will be evaluated upon its completion. The process of preparing the contract should be in cooperation with the New College office, from which contract forms may be procured, and with a faculty member or other authority qualified to assist and assess the study. Credit hours awarded for Out-of-Class Learning are available, relative to the breadth or depth of the study, and subject to approval of the advisor to the study and director of the New College.

NEW
321
Hours
1-12
Independent Study

A student desiring to pursue an academic interest for which no University class is available may plan his or her own "course" through Out-of-Class Learning. A contract, or agreement, with New College is prepared by the student, in which the student identifies a variety of features of the proposed study: its goals and objectives, the methodology and resources to be employed in the attempt to meet the goals and objectives, and the procedure by which the study will be evaluated upon its completion. The process of preparing the contract should be in cooperation with the New College office, from which contract forms may be procured, and with a faculty member or other authority qualified to assist and assess the study. Credit hours awarded for Out-of-Class Learning are available, relative to the breadth or depth of the study, and subject to approval of the advisor to the study and director of the New College.

NEW
332
Hours
3
Experimental Music

This course will introduce you to a variety of theories and practices of musical experimentalism in a global context. We’ll begin by defining what experimental music is – what is the impulse that drives some artists to push outside the realms of their traditions, or even outside what is normally called music? Rather than limiting our view to experimentalism in Western art music, as has largely been the case in surveys of this subject, we will also listen to and study experiments in jazz, rock, hip hop, reggae and other global musics to put the experimentalist aesthetic in a broad historical and cultural context. In addition to critical reading, discussion and listening we will perform experimental music compositions to encourage a “hands-on” engagement with the subject. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): N/A
NEW
333
Hours
9-15
CIEL Internship

This course serves as the course students register for as part of the exchange program with the Consoritum for Innovative Environment in Learning. Students pay tuition to UA but actually study as a full-time student at one of the 12 CIEL sister institutions.

NEW
334
Hours
3
Everyday Forestry in Alabama

This course will prepare students to understand natural resource practices to better manage one’s woodlands in a rural or urban situation. This course is for any student interested in basic forestry management techniques and should serve future home and land owners, individuals interested in conservation issues, and as an introduction to a broader field for students with professional interest in forestry or environmental studies. This course will discuss basic forest management concepts in order to improve the woodland’s habitat according to the objectives of a landowner. Students will learn how to identify all major tree species in Alabama as well as all major forest insects and diseases. Other topics that will be discussed will include compass and pacing, forest site evaluation, timber estimation, topographic map interpretation, and invasive woodland species. This course does not presuppose any previous knowledge and no prerequisite is required. Much of this course will include “hands-on” outdoor field trips.

Prerequisite(s): None
NEW
335
Hours
3
Everyday Wildlife In Alabama

The goal for this course is to prepare students to understand creative uses of managing wildlife species according to management objectives. This course is intended for any student interested in basic wildlife management techniques and should serve future home and land owners, individuals interested in conservation issues, and as an introduction to a broader field for students with professional interest in environmental studies or natural resources. This course does not presuppose any previous knowledge and no prerequisite is required.

Prerequisite(s): none
NEW
337
Hours
3
Designing and Maintaining a Sustainable Home Landscape

The purpose of this course is to prepare and encourage students to incorporate the principles of sustainability and the ethics of permaculture into their home or apartment landscape. This course is intended for any student interested in learning the basics of sustainable gardening, water management, pest management, and the use of native plants to provide a backyard habitat for birds and wildlife. No prerequisite is required.

Prerequisite(s): none
NEW
338
Hours
2
New College Review I

This workshop provides students with practical experience in writing and publishing a special interest publication, the New College Review. Students gain experience in thematic approaches to a publication, concept formation for an audience, socially responsible publishing, and writing and editing persuasive essays. Students are strongly encouraged to take both.

NEW
339
Hours
2
New College Review II

This workshop provides students with practical experience in writing and publishing a special interest publication, the New College Review. Students edit, design, and distribute the New College Review. Students are strongly encouraged to take both NEW 338 and NEW 339 in sequence.

NEW
342
Hours
3
Social Action and Performance

Social Action and Performance is open to all students. The course uses an interdisciplinary approach to the world of theatrical performance and explores the work of Augusto Boal and Theatre of the Oppressed model as a mechanism for social change. The course will train students to educate their peers through performance about interpersonal violence and contemporary issues of multiculturalism on campus. Students will use improvisation, participatory activities, readings, and assessments to engage in social action. Students are encouraged to participate in self-exploration with respect to the issues mentioned above as part of their trainings with these techniques. Students who participate in this course will become official members of the theatre troupe called Unscripted.

Prerequisite(s): (EN 101 and EN 102) or EN 103
NEW
360
Hours
3
Sound Studies

How do we experience, define, use and abuse sound? What elements of a sound determine their meaning to us, and why? What can we learn about the world by focusing on its sounds? An emerging interdisciplinary field of research, sound studies asks these questions and more, in an attempt to uncover the important role of sound in our lives. Why do shopping malls sound like they do? What do cellphone ringtones tell you about a person? How has the changing soundscape of the ocean affected natural processes and wildlife? Why do clocktower bells ring? How is music used to both soothe, entertain, and torture or control people? This interdisciplinary course explores sound in a variety of current and historical global contexts – of which music is only one small part – examining the many ways sound signifies and defines our cultures and histories.

Prerequisite(s): N/A
NEW
361
Hours
4
Handmade Sounds: A Hands-on History of Electronic Music

Did you know you can make electronic music with credit cards? Old toys? 30-cent circuit boards? This course will teach you to build your own electronic orchestra from scratch while also exploring the history of electronic music, with a special focus on tinkering experimenters that created electronic music using self-made instruments. Through a combination of theory and practice, you will learn about electronic music’s pioneers, recreating some of their early experiments to experience this history with your own hands and ears. We will explore the construction of a variety of simple electronic instruments, learn to play them, and perform a concert at the end of the term. No previous musical or technical experience is required, but there will be a significant amount of hands-on work with tools and wires in addition to the usual course load of reading, writing and discussion, so an interest in working with technology is a must. Each day of the course we will discuss the work of historical figures in electronic music followed by a laboratory period of hands-on exploration and creation. You are required to write 10 500-word essays articulating your response to the course materials. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): N/A
NEW
365
Hours
3
Introduction to Environmental Policy

This introductory environmental policy course reviews major developments in environmental regulation in the United States, considered in a global context. Readings examine the evolution of U.S. environmental policy, the form and function of social institutions used to govern human-environment interactions, including markets, state and civil society, and conventions, norms, and morals. U.S. and U.N. legal structures, agencies, and NGOs are addressed, with attention to comparative regulatory frameworks. The “new institutional approach,” “resource regimes,” and various incremental and transformative institutional reforms are discussed. The impact of economic and cultural factors—including class, race, gender, and location—on resource use and other policy decisions affecting the physical and built environments will be explored. Evolving institutional approaches to energy use, such as sustainability, “wise use,” adaptive management, and resilience are examined. This course is cross-listed with PSC 365.

Prerequisite(s): No prerequisites.
NEW
366
Hours
3
Waterways

This experiential seminar explores the natural history and ecology of our waterways, and examines the human dimensions of control and management, including policies and regulations to support environmental and human uses. Through readings, discussions, films, and field trips, we will explore the natural beauty and diversity of our aquatic ecosystems, and the ways in which we interact with our environment, both positively and negatively. In addition, we will examine current threats and impacts that development, pollution, and management have on our waterways, and consider policies designed to regulate or mitigate these impacts. This course includes field trips, some of which may occur outside of the regularly scheduled class period.

NEW
400
Hours
3
Sporting Conservation

This course is designed to provide students with an historical and contemporary understanding of the role that sportsmen and women play in the conservation and management of fish, game, and non-game species. Special attention will be given to sporting organizations and their role in the conservation and management of our nation’s natural resources. This course will also introduce students to important concepts within the wildlife and game management fields such as predator control, population dynamics, predator-prey relations, and introductory genetics.

NEW
401
Hours
4
Birds and Birding

This course will introduce students to the popular hobby of birding or bird watching. As such, basic field identification methods will be reviewed and practiced. We will also discuss larger conservation issues as they relate to birds. As we will learn, the phrase “canary in a coal mine” has very practical implication for the modern terrestrial world. We will also discuss the cultural connection between people and birds, and what that has meant for both the destruction and conservation of birds during the past couple of centuries.

NEW
407
Hours
3
407 W: Landscapes of the South

A study of environmental and cultural landscapes of the American South, as altered and used by successive waves of native peoples, explorers, immigrants, laborers, industrialists, and urban builders, addressing historical and contemporary environmental challenges.

NEW
410
Hours
3
Writing Culture: Ethnography in Theory & Practice

What does it mean to write about a culture? What can we discover about our environment by talking to people and listening to their stories? How do we learn enough to express something of their essence through words on a page? This course will engage with these and other issues surrounding the act of ethnography (the writing and interpretation of people's lives and cultural practices) through a combination of theoretical and practical approaches. Students interested in anthropology, journalism, sociology, storytelling, cultural criticism, filmmaking, folklore, the arts, social work and oral history will learn useful skills and gain practical experience that can be applied to their own work. We will read critical theory that discusses the role and craft of ethnography. We will examine a range of existing research on a number of global topics that use a variety of disciplinary approaches. Finally, as a research team, we will pursue self-designed research projects to begin the first stage of an "ethnographic map" of our region of Alabama, to learn new things about the world in our backyard and produce a website to share our findings. Interested students should be aware that the second half of the class will likely involve a significant amount of individual or group research in place of traditional course meeting times.

Prerequisite(s): N/A
NEW
412
Hours
4
Songwriting Workshop

Songcraft:songwriting workshop focuses on how songs are made. After a study of various genres (blues, troubadours, popular) students will produce their own songs. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

NEW
413
Hours
4
Mythologies

This course in comparative mythology introduces students to mythological systems from a variety of cultures, including preclassical, Greek, American Indian, Oriental, African, and contemporary American. Recurring motifs and current theories on the mythologizing process are analyzed.

NEW
415
Hours
3
Gender, Sexuality &Pop Culture

What constitutes "femininity" and "masculinity" in 21st century America? How have gender roles changed? Is gender performance? What are the cultural expectations around sexuality, and how is it influenced and policed in society? Includes professor's current case research in this field. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

NEW
416
Hours
3
American Environmental Thought

Popular conceptions of nature hold extraordinary power in shaping our responses and policies toward both the geophysical world and built environments. This interdisciplinary course examines key concepts and controversies in American thought about nature since before colonization. Using accounts from various regions, the course explores evolving conceptions of nature and justice, competing claims about race and class, and changing institutional responses and remedies to environmental degradation in the context of global change. The course is highly interactive, inviting critical thinking about the human place in the physical world. We read and discuss ecological views as presented in colonial writings, slave narratives, Transcendentalist thought, Gilded Age preservationist and conservationist debates, and the work of Progressive Era occupational health specialists and ecologists. We give specific attention to twentieth century social movements for environmental public health, examining contemporary approaches, including eco-feminism, environmental justice, and sustainability. We identify different disciplinary approaches, among them environmental history, ecological anthropology, sociology, and geography, and explore conceptual links between disciplines. A brief introduction to research methods, utilizing qualitative techniques, case studies, and specialized data sources, will be included. Journal articles, law review essays, regulatory documents, court decisions, and films supplement classic texts as we examine race, ethnicity, gender, poverty, and other factors shaping environmental health. Because this course carries a "W" for the Core Curriculum, writing proficiency is required for a passing grade.

NEW
418
Hours
4
Mash-Up: Intermedia Intersections in the Arts

This interdisciplinary course discusses intermedia intersections in 20th and 21st century art and music through lectures, discussions and interactions with visiting artists. We will examine the cultural and historical roots of intermedia art, the outpouring of experimentation in the 20th century avant-garde, and the postmodern pastiche of the digital realm in the 21st century. Spanning work created for galleries, to art and music from urban streets and rural villages, we will explore examples from the visual arts, dance, music, film and architecture to learn how and why artists work with and combine different media. In addition to engaging with a variety of artistic works, we will discuss the cultural, philosophical, theoretical, and compositional issues that meet at intermedia junctions. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.

NEW
420
Hours
3
Cultural Studies

This seminar provides an introduction to the key concepts, methodologies, and practice of Cultural Studies, focusing primarily on issues of cultural consumption, representation, audience, identity, and everyday life.

NEW
434
Hours
3
Documenting Justice I

Interdisciplinary course in ethnographic filmmaking, focusing particularly on analyzing the many dimensions of culture and social experience. Students produce a short documentary film on a story of justice or injustice in Alabama. A two semester course.

NEW
435
Hours
3
Documenting Justice II

Interdisciplinary course in ethnographic filmmaking, focusing particularly on analyzing the many dimensions of culture and social experience. Students produce a short documentary film on a story of justice or injustice in Alabama. A two semester course.

Prerequisite(s): NEW 434
NEW
436
Hours
4
Public Leadership

This seminar helps students develop the understanding and skills necessary for the practice of public leadership. The course emphasizes framing public issues for discussion and leading the decision making necessary to set the direction of public policy. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

NEW
437
Hours
4
Civic Awareness

Current events are examined through print and electronic media in order to assist students in evaluating various sources of information concerning public issues and in developing a public philosophy for responsibilities as a citizen.

NEW
439
Hours
3
Urban Spaces: The Nature of Cities

This interdisciplinary social science course provides an introduction to the cultural and physical ecology of cities, focusing primarily on urbanization in the United States from the late 19th century to the present.

NEW
441
Hours
4
Climate Change Seminar

This seminar introduces students to the science of global climate change and examines public perception and coverage of the topic in various news media outlets, films, and books. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

NEW
442
Hours
3
Environmental Ethics and Problems

This upper level writing intensive seminar explores the ethical dimensions of ecological relationships, with particular attention to conceptions of nature, justice, and environmental health. We will consider classical ethical concepts, such as utilitarianism and natural law theories, and contemporary environmental approaches, including biocentrism, deep ecology, environmental justice, eco-feminism, and sustainability. This course will be highly interactive, inviting critical thinking about changing ideas about the human place in the natural world. Examining various case studies, we explore the ethical debates surrounding such topics as populations, genetically altered crops, global climate change, biodiversity, and emerging crises in global environmental public health. Readings also address corporate responsibility, science ethics, and public policy. We will consider the ethics of sustainability from the campus to the transnational level. This course meets a college core writing requirement; a demonstration of writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. The course has New College designations for Environment, Sustainability, and Conservation (ESC) and Social Problems and Social Change (SPSC).

NEW
443
Hours
4
Science & Technology

The course teaches scientific concepts (time and laws of thermodynamics, change, measurement, reality, etc.) as they relate to the various sciences (anthropology, mathematics, etc.). The relationship of science and technology to the environment of the Earth's surface is stressed.

NEW
445
Hours
3
Technology and Humans

This interdisciplinary seminar provides an introduction to the key debates and questions raised by the increasingly close relationship between humans and advanced technologies. The course will draw on critical works, as well as narrative fiction and popular culture texts, to examine how a dependence on technology might change the very definition of "human" and what subsequent ethical, psychological, and philosophical dilemmas result from this close relationship.

NEW
446
Hours
3
Gender and Environment

This course examines histories of concepts of nature and gender, philosophies of eco-feminism, and accounts of gender-based efforts for environmental reform.

NEW
450
Hours
4
Conservation Field Studies in Belize

Study Belize’s diverse rainforests, coral reefs, and visit Mayan ruins for a glimpse into a past civilization. Belize is unique in that it still contains relatively undisturbed rainforests and the longest barrier reef in the Western Hemisphere. However, while Belize has emerged as an international leader regarding conservation efforts, threats from climate change, poverty, and development still exist. The purpose of this course is 1) examine current conservation efforts to safeguard this biodiversity; 2) familiarize students with the most important aspects of tropical lowland terrestrial and marine ecosystems; 3) understand the role of local culture in sustainable conservation; 4) gain an understanding of the fundamental importance of biodiversity; and 5) expose students to new and unique cultures and environments. The course is designed for students who are interested in conservation issues, biogeography, marine sciences, ornithology and birding, archaeology, and outdoor adventures! The trip will be divided between a rainforest and a marine field station located next to the barrier reef. So we will have easy access the most diverse environments on the planet.

NEW
472
Hours
4
Social Change

This seminar is concerned with the process and analysis of social change. In this seminar, students study the Holocaust, attempting to understand it as an intense and unparalleled human experience. The causes, events, outcomes, and implications are researched through books, films, interviews, tapes, and discussions. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

NEW
473
Hours
4
Globalization & Folk Crft Prod

This course examines the relationship between the global and the local, using world folk craft (for example, pottery) as a point of focus. The functions of creativity in industrialized and nonindustrialized societies are explored through a combination of reading, research, discussion, and studio experiences. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

NEW
474
Hours
4
Survival

In this seminar, students study the nature of human and societal survival under extreme conditions. Topics range from issues of a global nature to violent crime, prejudice, and disease. Causes, effects, and possible solutions are all considered. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

NEW
490
Hours
3-4
Special Topics

The subject matter varies.

NEW
491
Hours
3-4
Special Topics - Practice

Subject matter varies. Hands on interdiscplinary learning opportunities.

NEW
495
Hours
2
Capstone Sem & Senior Project

14 hours of New College coursework and successful junior year review. New College students only, concluding integrative project.


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