College of Arts and Sciences

The College of Arts and Sciences is central to the instructional, research and outreach missions of The University of Alabama. The College provides the fundamental liberal arts foundation necessary to the education of all University of Alabama students. It is dedicated to educating individuals based on the liberal arts philosophy of making each student a life-long learner.

The College of Arts and Sciences offers majors and minors in a variety of disciplines in the social and behavioral sciences, the natural sciences, mathematics, the humanities, fine arts and performing arts. The College offers programs of study leading to the following degrees: bachelor of arts (BA), bachelor of science (BS), bachelor of music (BM), bachelor of fine arts (BFA), bachelor of science in chemistry (BCh), bachelor of science in geology (BSG) and bachelor of science in microbiology (BMB).

General Education Requirement

Students must meet the general education requirement. All courses that carry the following general education designations are listed on The University of Alabama's website and are usually displayed in each semester’s Schedule of Classes. Please consult the listings for each semester. 

  1. Freshman Composition (FC) – Six hours
  2. Upper-level Writing (W) – Six hours: Writing-designated courses are 300- and 400-level courses usually completed in the student's junior and senior years and most commonly in the major or minor. The writing requirement must be satisfied by courses taken at The University of Alabama.
  3. Foreign Language (FL) and Computer (C) – Six hours: Each student completes one of the following options: Six semester hours in courses approved for the computer designation (such courses assume a working knowledge of the computer) OR two semesters or the equivalent in one foreign language. Students must earn grades of C- or higher in the first course of the two-semester sequence before enrolling in the second course.
  4. Humanities (HU), Literature (L) and Fine Arts (FA) – 12 hours: To satisfy this requirement, each student completes the following: three hours of fine arts, three hours of literature, and six hours of other fine arts, literature or humanities courses. Each student must complete a six-semester-hour sequence in either literature or history. To satisfy the breadth of learning so crucial to general education, a maximum of six hours in any one department may be applied to the humanities, literature, fine arts, history and social and behavioral sciences requirements.
  5. History (HI) and Social and Behavioral Sciences (SB) – 12 hours: To satisfy this requirement, each student completes the following: three hours of history and nine hours of other HI and SB courses.
  6. Natural sciences (N) and Mathematics (MA) – 11 hours: To satisfy this requirement, each student completes the following: eight hours of natural sciences (including six hours of lecture and two hours of accompanying lab) and three hours of mathematics (the mathematics requirement must be satisfied with MATH 110 Finite Mathematics or higher).

All BS degrees must include Calculus I (MATH 125 Calculus I or MATH 145 Honors Calculus I), or a higher-level calculus course.

Students in Arts and Sciences degree programs may not apply CSM 116 Quantitative Methods of Financ as a core math (MA). Only courses with a MATH abbreviation may be used to fulfill this requirement. This rule also applies to students who may have taken CSM 116 Quantitative Methods of Financ while enrolled in another academic division but later transferred to A&S.

Major

Major Subjects of Specialization

Each student must have at least one major subject of specialization. See the listing for majors and minors available in the College of Arts and Sciences. Requirements for majors and minors can be found under academic departments.

Hours in the Major

Each major requires a specific number of hours that is specified in the description of the major in this catalog. A student may choose to take additional hours in the major, but the department cannot require more than the stated number. Students in degree programs requiring 120 hours may apply a total of 42 hours in a single discipline toward degree requirements. Courses specifically excluded from the major are not included in the 42 hours.

Residency in the Major

All students, including transfer students, must complete in residence a minimum of 12 hours at the 300- or 400-level in the major. Additional residency requirements are cited in this catalog.

Grade Point Average in the Major

Each student must earn a minimum grade point average of 2.0. A student’s major GPA is calculated in the following manner:

  1. Calculation is based only on classes currently being used to complete major requirements.
  2. Calculation does not include failed and repeated courses.
  3. Calculation does not include classes in the major subject area that were taken over and above what is required to complete the major. Since these classes are not actually completing requirements, they are not taken into consideration.
  4. When multiple classes can be used to complete a particular requirement, the class with the best grade will be used in the GPA calculation.
  5. Both UA institutional coursework and transfer work will be used to calculate the major GPA.

Duplication of Coursework

The use of the same course to satisfy specific requirements in the major and minor is not permitted. However, courses that are used to satisfy General Education Requirements can be used to complete major or minor requirements. Ancillary courses required for the major may be used to satisfy requirements in the minor or in the second major.

Double Majors

A student may major in two subjects with the following provisions:

  1. If the two majors lead to different degrees offered in the College of Arts and Sciences (BA, BFA, BM, BS or one of the designated degrees) or in another UA division, the student chooses which one of the degrees to receive.
  2. A minor is not required, but one minor may be specified. Double minors are not permitted in combination with double majors.

Minor or Second Major

A minor or a second major is required for the majority of students. See the requirements for majors and minors as listed in this catalog.

Hours in the Minor

This catalog states the number of hours and the specific courses that are required for minors approved for students in the College of Arts and Sciences. A student may choose to take additional hours in the minor, but the department cannot require more than the stated number. Minors are subject to the same limitations on concentration of applicable hours as are majors.

Residency in the Minor

All students, including transfer students, must complete in residence a minimum of six hours at the 300- or 400-level in the minor. Additional residency requirements are cited in this catalog.

Grade Point Average in the Minor

Each student must earn a minimum 2.0 grade point average. A student’s minor GPA is calculated in the following manner:

  1. Calculation is based only on classes currently being used to complete minor requirements.
  2. Calculation does not include failed and repeated courses.
  3. Calculation does not include classes in the minor subject area that were taken over and above what is required to complete the minor. Since these classes are not actually completing requirements, they are not taken into consideration.
  4. When multiple classes can be used to complete a particular requirement, the class with the best grade will be used in the GPA calculation.
  5. Both UA institutional coursework and transfer work will be used to calculate the GPA.

Duplication of Coursework

The use of the same course to satisfy specific requirements in the major and minor is not permitted. However, courses that are used to satisfy General Education Requirements can be used to complete major or minor requirements. Ancillary courses required for the major may be used to satisfy requirements in the minor or in the second major.

Double Minors

Students may minor in two subjects, with the following provisions:

  1. One minor may be selected from approved minors in other divisions.
  2. There is no duplication of coursework used to complete the two minor programs or the major and minors.

Electives

Additional coursework to achieve 120 hours or more in the degree program is required.

Additional Expectations

These additional requirements are important to ensuring the liberal arts character of the degree program. The requirements set minimum standards for the degree, including the promotion of sufficient study at The University of Alabama, setting minimum standards of performance quality, establishing expectations for study at the advanced level and in liberal arts disciplines, and limiting the applicability of certain types of courses.

Catalog

All degree requirements are met under one catalog. This is usually determined by the catalog in effect at the time of the student’s first enrollment, but a student may change his or her catalog to a more recent one.

Residence in the College and in the Major and Minor

While enrolled in the College of Arts and Sciences, students must earn a minimum of 30 hours on this campus. A minimum of 12 hours in each major and six hours in each minor must be earned at the 300- or 400-level in residence.

Minimum Hours with 2.0 Grade Point Average

  1. Each student must complete a minimum of 120 semester hours of coursework approved by the College of Arts and Sciences.
  2. Each student must earn a minimum 2.0 grade point average on the total number of hours attempted, including all work at UA and all transfer work.
  3. Each student must earn a minimum 2.0 grade point average on hours attempted at The University of Alabama.

36 Hours in 300- and 400-Level Courses

Each student in the College of Arts and Sciences must complete a minimum of 36 semester hours in courses at the 300 or 400 level. The 36-hour total includes the 300- and 400-level courses completed in fulfillment of major and minor requirements.

Junior college credits are not considered advanced level.

90 Hours within the Disciplines of the College

All degree programs in the College of Arts and Sciences require at least 90 hours selected from A&S or related disciplines. Transfer courses in these disciplines apply to the completion of the 90-hour requirement.

Courses with the following prefixes count toward this requirement: AAST, AMS, ANT, ARB, ARH, ART, AS, AY, BSC, BUI, CH, CHI, CL, CD, CBH, CIP, CJ, CRL, CROA, CS, CZE, DN, DNCA, DUT, EC, EN, FA, FIN, FLC, FR, FRS, GS, GY, GEO, GN, GR, HEB, HIN, HY, HU, IHP, INDO, IT, JA, KOR, LA, MS, MATH, MDGR, MLC, MUA, MUS, NEW, NOR, PH, PHL, POL, POR, PSC, PY, REL, RUS, SAN, SOC, SP, SS, ST, SWA, SWED, TH, THAI, TURK, UA, UH, URDU, VIET, WS, WL.

Degree Credit for Activity Courses

A student may apply a maximum of four semester hours in activity courses toward graduation.

Activity courses include compass courses (AS 101 Freshman Compass Course: Arts & Sciences, AS 102 Compass: Arts & Sciences, AS 299 Junior Seminar, BCE 101 Freshman Compass: UA, GBA 145 Freshman Compass: CBA, HES 100 Freshman Compass Human Env Sci, NUR 102 Freshman Compass: Nursing, NUR 104 Liv Learning Prof Nursing Prac); leadership courses (AHE 450 Res Asst Leadershp Devlp, HES 275 Leadership Develop Thru Serv); career exploration course (HES 250 Career Develop/Planning); recreation courses (NEW 201 Recreation For Life); kinesiology activity and coaching courses ( KIN 295 , KIN 352 Psychology of Coaching, KIN 370 Coaching Soccer, KIN 381 Coaching Football, KIN 382 Coaching Basketball, KIN 383 Coaching Baseball, KIN 386 Coaching Volleyball, KIN 420 Issues in Athletics Coaching); and 100-level and 200-level military or Air Force studies courses.

Degree Credit for Upper-Division Courses in Military Science and Air Force Studies (MIL and AFS)

A student may apply toward graduation a maximum of 12 semester hours of credit in 300- and 400-level courses in military science (MIL) or Air Force studies (AFS).

Multiple Undergraduate Degrees

Students and former students interested in obtaining a second bachelor’s degree and currently enrolled students interested in earning concurrent degrees must adhere to several stipulations described in this section of the catalog. A student may only be awarded one degree with the same degree type (i.e., bachelor of arts, bachelor of science, bachelor of science in electrical engineering, etc.). For example, once a bachelor of arts is earned, a student may pursue a second major associated with a bachelor of arts but not a second bachelor of arts degree. In this example, the student could pursue a bachelor of arts in communication because the degree type is different.

Students are responsible for declaring their intent to pursue a second bachelor degree by filing an approval plan of study with the primary college of residency. To ensure appropriate advising, approval is obtained at a point when no less than 30 hours of course work remains for the completion of one or both degrees. Students are also responsible for re-filing updated plans of study if changes are desired.

For degrees in different colleges, students must establish one college as the primary college of residency. If program accreditation is a component of the degree program, then the primary college of residency must be the college of the degree program whose professional accreditation requires residency. The student must pay all fees and adhere to all requirements of each college, other than residency.

Students are responsible for filing a degree application for each degree sought according to the published degree application submission deadlines of the colleges and/or schools recommending the degrees and within the deadlines established by the Office of the University Registrar. 

Concurrent Bachelor Degrees

Currently enrolled students are encouraged to pursue graduate level studies toward an advanced degree through the University Scholars Program in lieu of pursuing a concurrent bachelor’s degree. However, a currently enrolled student may earn two different bachelor’s degrees (i.e., a B.A. and a B.S.) concurrently. Both degrees do not have to be received in the same semester provided the concurrent degree plan of study was approved prior to the receipt of the first degree. Students pursuing concurrent degrees must adhere to the following provisions:

  1. Each student must earn a minimum of 150 credit hours, including a minimum of 60 credit hours in residence.
  2. Each student must complete all University, College, major and minor requirements for both degree programs. If more than one minor is required, only one must be completed.
  3. Each student must fulfill all prerequisites and course requirements in the two different major fields.
  4. Courses may be counted toward meeting the requirements in more than one area unless specifically prohibited by the academic departments and so stated in the catalog. However, credit for such a course cannot be applied toward both the total hours required for the first degree and the additional hours required for any additional degree.
  5. A student who completes all requirements for two or more different degrees (e.g., bachelor of arts and bachelor of science) will be awarded multiple degrees and will receive multiple diplomas.

Second Bachelor Degree, UA Alumni

A student who has previously earned a bachelor degree from The University of Alabama and wishes to pursue further undergraduate work may complete an additional major and have it noted on the official transcript (with date of completion) OR earn a second degree if it is different from the first (i.e., a B.A. if the first degree was a B.S., and vice versa). This student must apply for readmission for the second degree and meet the following provisions:

  1. Each student must earn a minimum of 30 additional credit hours in residence in the College of Arts and Sciences over and above any hours applied to the first degree.
  2. Each student must complete all University, College and major requirements for the second degree in the catalog under which the student enters, or in a subsequent catalog.
  3. Each student must fulfill all prerequisite and course requirements in the major field(s) for the second degree.

Second Bachelor Degree, Non-Alumni

A student holding a bachelor degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher learning may earn a second bachelor degree, in most instances, from The University of Alabama by fulfilling a specific set of requirements at both the College and University level. The student must apply for admission for the second degree and meet the following provisions:

  1. Each student must meet all requirements for the second degree to include all course hours, grade point, ancillary, prerequisite and residency requirements specified by the degree program.
  2. If a student holds a bachelor degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher learning, the University presumes all general education requirements have been completed. This presumption does not apply to ancillary requirements.
  3. Each student must earn 25% of the degree requirements (a minimum of 30 additional credit hours for a 120 hour degree) in residence at The University of Alabama over and above any hours applied to the first degree.

Expected Progress

During the fall and spring semesters, the recommended course load for students in the College of Arts and Sciences is 14-16 hours per semester. A course load of more than 18 hours requires special permission (A&S Student Services Center, 200 Clark Hall). A course load under 12 hours is not considered full-time enrollment.  Institutional research has shown that graduation rates are significantly higher for students who complete at least 12 hours during their first college semester, as compared with students who do not complete at least 12 hours.

During the summer semester, students may enroll for a maximum of 17 hours (3 hours in Interim and 7 hours each summer term).

Student Responsibility

  1. Students are expected to familiarize themselves with this catalog and consult academic advisers in planning their programs of study.
  2. Students are responsible for registering for course loads appropriate to the degrees they seek and consistent with their individual circumstances.
  3. Students are expected to pursue successful completion of all courses in which they enroll.
  4. Students are responsible for monitoring the accuracy of their academic records and reporting any errors to the college registrar in the A&S Student Services Center, 200 Clark Hall.
  5. Students are expected to maintain a Crimson email account, mailing addresses and telephone numbers at which they can be reached with reasonable certainty and to respond promptly to all communications from the University and the college.
  6. Students are expected to be familiar with the current academic calendar.
  7. Students are expected to make full use of DegreeWorks and other available advising resources in executing their academic success plans. 

Admission and Retention

The College of Arts and Sciences admits students on the basis of the University’s general admission requirements listed in this catalog. As noted in the department program descriptions, in some departments, admission to upper-division status, clinical training programs, internships, practicums, etc., may require higher levels of scholarship. Retention is based on the general scholarship rule and the scholastic progress standard.

Course Placement

The College of Arts and Sciences awards credits and places students in courses based on several criteria. First, course credits are awarded based on Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate scores. Other placement information is as follows:

In English

EN 103 Advanced English Composition is an accelerated freshman composition course that is open to students with ACT composite scores of 28 or ACT English scores of 30 and above, or SAT scores of 1240 and above or SAT Verbal scores of 720. With a grade of C- or higher at the completion of the course, placement credit is awarded for EN 101 English Composition and the general studies requirement for freshman composition is complete.

In Foreign Languages

The course level at which students begin their study of a foreign language is determined by several factors. These factors include the following: the number of high school units complete, language placement examination scores, or faculty evaluation for those with native or heritage competency. Placement assessments are offered in French, German, Latin, Russian and Spanish.

Level Placement Criteria
101No prior instruction in the language, fewer than two high school units in the language, instruction more than four years ago, or UA placement test
102UA credit for 101, or except for Spanish, UA placement test
103Two high school units in the language or 101 at another institution1
201Credit for 102 or 103 or UA placement test
202Credit for 201 or UA placement test
300Credit for 202 or UA placement test
1

103 available in German and Spanish

When students are placed in French, German, Latin, Spanish and Russian courses numbered 200 or higher and they successfully complete the course into which they were placed, they can apply to the Department of Modern Languages and Classics to receive credits for some courses that precede the course into which they were placed.

Members of the language faculty individually place International students who possess native competency in a language or United States citizens who are bilingual. These students normally do not receive credit for courses below the 300 level. These students should contact the Department of Modern Languages and Classics before attending summer orientation or before registering for a course in the language in which they have this competency.

In Mathematics

For those students who do not have credit for any college-level mathematics equivalent to a UA mathematics course, placement is determined by their ACT or SAT score in mathematics. If students are not pleased with their placement based on their ACT or SAT mathematics score, they may elect to take the UA Math Placement Assessment through the Office of Testing Services. The Math Placement Assessment may be taken twice.

In Music

Auditions determine placement in specific applied courses. Auditions should occur before freshman orientation and registration.

Changes in Student Course Schedules

While students may change schedules, it is important that students maintain at least 12 hours of coursework each fall and spring semester, and the recommendation is for 14-16 hours.

First-semester freshmen and first-semester transfer students who have not met the freshman composition requirement enroll in an appropriate English composition course and continue taking required English courses until the composition requirement is met. Students may not drop required freshman-level English courses. Students also may not withdraw from mathematics courses graded A, B, C or NC. These mathematics courses include:

MATH 005Introductory Algebra3
MATH 100Intermediate Algebra3
MATH 110Finite Mathematics3
MATH 112Precalculus Algebra3
MATH 113Precalculus Trigonometry3
MATH 115Precalc Algebra & Trig3

Students may drop or add courses during the late registration period at the beginning of each semester. Specific dates are given on the University of Alabama website.

A student may drop a course other than the English and mathematics courses listed above with a grade of W during the first 10 weeks of the fall and spring semesters.

After the tenth week of class, only under extraordinary and well-documented circumstances are students allowed to petition for special consideration to withdraw with a grade of W. Requests for late withdrawals are made to the Student Services Center in 200 Clark Hall.

The short summer terms permit a drop with a grade of W for two weeks.

Course Repeat

A course passed at any institution with a grade of A, B or C cannot be repeated at The University of Alabama, except as an audit.

A course passed at The University of Alabama with a grade of D may be repeated. A record of both the original and repeat enrollment appears on the student’s transcript. With respect to hours and grade points applicable to degree requirements and honors-designation requirements in the college, each enrollment is counted in the cumulative hours attempted and cumulative grade points earned, but only the most recent enrollment counts in the cumulative hours applicable to the degree.

Audit

A student may audit one course per semester. Permission to audit may be obtained in the A&S Student Services Center, 200 Clark Hall, and the request to audit must be made before the end of the late registration period at the beginning of each semester. An auditor may not take the tests or the final examination in the course. A course that is taken as an audit may not be taken at a later date for credit.

Pass/Fail Option

The pass/fail option is designed to encourage students to explore areas of study outside the major and minor. A course taken pass/fail counts as elective credit only; it cannot be used to satisfy any specific requirement and does not count in the minimum number of hours required for the major or minor. University-wide pass/fail regulations are explained in the general information section of this catalog. To take a course pass/fail, students in the College of Arts and Sciences must receive approval in the A&S Student Services Center, 200 Clark Hall, before the end of the late registration period at the beginning of each semester.

Prerequisite Policy

The catalog and registration system provide information on the preparation necessary in order to enroll in a specific course. All 300-level courses in the College of Arts and Sciences have either a specific prerequisite course or have the expectation that the student will have junior standing (61 earned hours), or the permission of the instructor, in order to enroll.

Graduation

Each candidate for a degree must apply for degree through myBama in the semester immediately prior to the term in which he or she plans to graduate. For example, students who expect to complete degree requirements in May should submit the online degree application during the preceding fall semester. Those who expect to finish degree requirements in August or December should submit the application during the previous spring semester.

Degrees are awarded in May, August and December.

Major and Minor Advising

A student entering the University who has an academic interest in one of the major programs of the College is encouraged to designate that field at admission. During their freshman year, all Arts and Sciences students are advised through the Student Services Center in 200 Clark Hall. At the end of the first year of enrollment, students who have declared a major are advised through their academic department and enjoy the benefit of faculty knowledge, advice and enthusiasm for their particular field of study. Each academic department has an undergraduate advising director and designates a specific faculty member to work with each student, individually. The student and adviser work together in planning the major and minor programs of study. Changes in coursework required for the major or minor program of study can be made upon the written recommendation of the departmental undergraduate director or chair. Such changes are reported to the College Registrar by the department for incorporation into the student’s record.

Acceptance for Major and Minor Programs of Study

The college expects students to declare a major by the fourth semester of full-time enrollment. Students should be familiar with the criteria for acceptance into particular programs and be prepared to meet those criteria. Students can declare a major by completing the Change of Major/Minor Application online under the Student tab of myBama. Please note that some majors and minors may require auditions, special applications or permissions. Specific requirements for each major and minor are included in the program descriptions outlined in this catalog.

College Advising

Student Services Center
200 Clark Hall
studentservices@as.ua.edu
(205) 348-5970

The College of Arts and Sciences Student Services Center staff provides assistance to all of the college’s undergraduates. Services include academic advising for all students focused on College- and University-level requirements or on coursework necessary for law school or health careers. Specific services include: academic planning assistance, college-level scholarship programs, compass courses, degree applications and graduation certification, freshman learning communities, freshman and transfer student orientation, general information about academic policies and procedures, course articulation and equivalency, advising for study abroad, junior-year advising audits, living-learning communities, services for prospective students and newly admitted students, and special permissions to add or drop courses. Other services include: academic bankruptcy, change of division, schedule changes, and permissions to take overloads, to audit a class and to reconcile time conflicts.

In addition, the Student Services Center houses the College’s first-year advising program and programs of pre-professional advising for students interested in careers as health professionals (other than nursing) and those interested in studying law.

First-year Advising Program

200 Clark Hall
(205) 348-5970
as.ua.edu/home/undergraduates/academic_advising_and_registration/student_services_center
studentservices@as.ua.edu

The College of Arts and Sciences offers a First-year Advising Program. The mission of the First-year Advising Program is to have each student enjoy the resources and opportunities of the University and the college, take personal ownership of his or her academic career and graduate in a timely fashion. It is designed especially for freshman students transitioning from high school to college. These students may enter the college as designated majors, or they may be pre-major students who wish to explore different academic interests while they make progress toward their degrees. Students who enter as pre-major studies complete general education requirements at the same pace as students who have decided on their interest areas. The First-year Advising Program offers academic advising, out-of-class programs and opportunities for study in a number of fields so that students may make informed decisions about their major field of study or choosing a field of study. This program works cooperatively with and encourages students to use the resources of the Center for Academic Success, the Writing Center, the Career Center, the Community Service Center, the departments of the college and other UA academic divisions. The First-year Advising Program is closely aligned with the college’s program of living-learning and learning communities.

Health Professions Student Services

200 Clark Hall
(205) 348-5970
premed.ua.edu
premed@ua.edu

The health professions advising program works with all students who are interested in pursuing careers in dentistry, medicine, pharmacy, physical therapy and other health professions fields except nursing.

Pre-Dental Program

A wide variety of programs may be planned that will fulfill specific requirements for admission to dental school and allow students to pursue their individual academic interests. Students preparing to enter dental school should consult the catalogs of the dental schools of their interest early in their undergraduate enrollment in order to be informed of the exact requirements for entrance.

Although specific admission requirements vary, most dental schools require:

Hours
BSC 114
BSC 115 or
Principles Of Biology I
and Laboratory Biology I
4
BSC 118 Honors General Biology I
BSC 116
BSC 117 or
Principles Biology II
and Biology II Laboratory
4
BSC 120 Honors Gen Biology II
BSC elective4
CH 101 or General Chemistry4
CH 117 Honors General Chemistry
CH 102 or General Chemistry4
CH 118 Honors General Chemistry
CH 231Elem Organic Chemistry I3
CH 232Elem Organic Chem II3
CH 237Elem Organic Chem Lab2
PH 101 or General Physics I or 4
PH 105 General Physics W/Calc I
PH 125 Honors Gen Ph W/Calculus
PH 102 or General Physics II or 4
PH 106 General Physics W/Calc II
PH 126 Honors Gen Ph W/Calculus II
MATH 125 or Calculus I4
MATH 145 Honors Calculus I

Since admission to professional schools is highly competitive, students planning careers in the health professions should be aware that satisfactory completion of pre-professional requirements does not guarantee admission to professional schools. Therefore, students are advised to plan undergraduate programs with some attention to possible alternative goals. Periodically, the health professions advisers will assist students in realistically evaluating their potential for admission to professional schools.

The pre-dental program adviser is the primary adviser for students who enter the University as pre-dental until they declare a specific major. After that, and for other students who have an interest in dentistry, the pre-dental adviser is available as a secondary source to assist specifically with issues related to dental school.

Pre-Medical Program

The pre-medical program advisers assist students in academic planning needed to meet the admissions requirements for medical school. The advisers also provide students with assistance in preparing for interviews, scheduling the MCAT, developing recommendations and submitting application materials. Student organizations, especially Alpha Epsilon Delta, are important parts of the pre-medical education of UA students. Information about these organizations can be obtained from the pre-med advisers.

Students interested in pursuing a career in medicine may choose from a wide variety of programs that will fulfill specific requirements for admission to medical school and allow them to pursue individual academic interests. Students preparing to enter medical school should consult the catalog of the medical school of interest early in their undergraduate careers in order to be informed of each school’s admissions requirements.

Although specific admissions requirements vary, most medical schools require the courses listed below. Most of these courses should be completed in the freshman and sophomore years:

Hours
BSC 114
BSC 115 or
Principles Of Biology I
and Laboratory Biology I
4
BSC 118 Honors General Biology I
BSC 116
BSC 117 or
Principles Biology II
and Biology II Laboratory
4
BSC 120 Honors Gen Biology II
CH 101 or General Chemistry4
CH 117 Honors General Chemistry
CH 102 or General Chemistry4
CH 118 Honors General Chemistry
CH 231Elem Organic Chemistry I3
CH 232Elem Organic Chem II3
CH 237Elem Organic Chem Lab2
BSC 450 or Fundamentals of Biochemistry3
CH 461 Biochemistry I
PH 101 or General Physics I or 4
PH 105 General Physics W/Calc I
PH 125 Honors Gen Ph W/Calculus
PH 102 or General Physics II or 4
PH 106 General Physics W/Calc II
PH 126 Honors Gen Ph W/Calculus II
MATH 125 or Calculus I4
MATH 145 Honors Calculus I

The pre-medical program adviser is the primary adviser for students who enter the University as pre-medical until they declare a specific major. After that and for other students who have an interest in medicine, the adviser is available as a secondary source to assist specifically with issues related to medical school preparation.

Pre-Pharmacy Program

The College of Arts and Sciences at The University of Alabama offers prerequisite courses needed prior to admission to graduate programs in pharmacy. A student wanting to complete a doctoral degree in pharmacy in the minimum period of time should plan on transferring to a school of pharmacy after completing the required undergraduate courses, and he/she should begin the application process after the first or second year of undergraduate study. Some students apply for admission to a pharmacy program at a later stage, such as following the completion of an undergraduate degree, provided they have met appropriate admission requirements.

Registration in the freshman and sophomore years in the College of Arts and Sciences does not guarantee admission to the professional phase of a school of pharmacy. Enrollment in the professional phase is limited, and the student will be accepted in accord with his or her scholastic standing and aptitude for a career in pharmacy. An admissions committee makes final selection of students, and although there is no absolute, required grade point average, students accepted in recent years have approximately averaged a 3.5 GPA or higher on a 4.0 scale.

Because prerequisite courses vary considerably among pharmacy schools, and the requirements frequently change, the most prudent approach is to consult the websites of the pharmacy schools for the most recent required courses. American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy maintains a database of pharmacy schools, and the health professions advisers can also assist students with choosing appropriate undergraduate courses. Most pharmacy schools will require at a minimum:

Hours
CH 101 or General Chemistry4
CH 117 Honors General Chemistry
CH 102 or General Chemistry4
CH 118 Honors General Chemistry
CH 231Elem Organic Chemistry I3
CH 232Elem Organic Chem II3
CH 237Elem Organic Chem Lab2
BSC 215Human Anatomy & Physiology I4
BSC 216Human Anatomy & Physiology II4
MATH 125 or Calculus I4
MATH 145 Honors Calculus I

Each pharmacy school determines additional undergraduate course requirements.

The pre-pharmacy program adviser is the primary adviser for students who enter the University as pre-pharmacy until they declare a specific major. After that and for other students who have an interest in pharmacy, the adviser is available as a secondary source to assist specifically with issues related to pre-pharmacy.

Pre-Physical Therapy Program

Although some institutions offer undergraduate degrees in physical therapy, the standard for practice in the field of physical therapy is the graduate degree. The College of Arts and Sciences does not offer an undergraduate degree program in physical therapy, but instead offers programs of study that prepare students appropriately for entry into master’s and doctoral programs. In preparing for entry into a graduate program, students may pursue one of several different majors in the College of Arts and Sciences.

The pre-physical therapy program assists students in completing degrees at The University of Alabama that prepare them to enter graduate programs in physical therapy elsewhere. As an example of some of the important fields of study that are parts of the preparation of pre-physical therapy students, UA students who enter the doctoral program in physical therapy at The University of Alabama at Birmingham are expected to have completed the courses that follow in English, the sciences, psychology and mathematics:

Hours
EN 101English Composition3
EN 102English Composition3
BSC 114
BSC 115 or
Principles Of Biology I
and Laboratory Biology I
4
BSC 118 Honors General Biology I
BSC 116
BSC 117 or
Principles Biology II
and Biology II Laboratory
4
BSC 120 Honors Gen Biology II
BSC 215Human Anatomy & Physiology I4
BSC 216Human Anatomy & Physiology II4
CH 101 or General Chemistry4
CH 117 Honors General Chemistry
CH 102 or General Chemistry4
CH 118 Honors General Chemistry
PH 101 or General Physics I or 4
PH 105 General Physics W/Calc I
PH 125 Honors Gen Ph W/Calculus
PH 102 or General Physics II or 4
PH 106 General Physics W/Calc II
PH 126 Honors Gen Ph W/Calculus II
MATH 113Precalculus Trigonometry3
PY 101Intro To Psychology3
PY 211Elem Statistical Methods3
PY electives6

The pre-physical therapy adviser is the primary adviser for students who enter the University as pre-physical therapy until they declare a specific major. After that and for other students who have an interest in physical therapy, the adviser is available as a secondary source to assist specifically with issues related to study in physical therapy.

Advising for Other Health Professions

While at The University of Alabama, students may prepare for professions in occupational therapy, veterinary medicine, chiropractic medicine, podiatry or any other health-related profession requiring an advanced degree. Required undergraduate courses vary considerably among these programs; therefore, students should make an appointment with the health professions advisers early in their academic programs to ensure that they are adequately prepared for admission to a graduate program following completion of a degree at The University of Alabama. For more information, contact the health professions advisers at (205) 348-5970.

Pre-Law Program

200 Clark Hall
(205) 348-5970
prelaw.ua.edu
prelaw@as.ua.edu

The pre-law program works with students who are interested in law as a career to plan the courses and experiences that will best prepare them for law school, to decide which specific schools are best for them, and to complete the application process. Students preparing for law school may pursue different disciplinary interests. Several departments in the College of Arts and Sciences, including the Department of Philosophy, the Department of Political Science and New College, offer pre-law programs of study, but many other departments offer courses that prepare pre-law students. Visits to the UA Law School, shadowing, student organizations and internships are important parts of the pre-law experience.

Unlike some pre-professional programs that require specific courses, the pre-law program emphasizes the importance of broad liberal arts preparation. Courses that require substantial writing are good preparations for law school, as are those courses that require logical thinking and the construction of arguments. Appropriate courses range from English and history, to economics and mathematics, to communication studies. Examples of pre-law courses include the following:

Hours
COM 100Rhetoric And Society3
COM 123Public Speaking3
COM 348Argumentation3
EC 110Principles of Microeconomics3
PHL 104 or Critical Thinking3
COM 122 Critical Decision Making
PHL 195Introduction to Deductive Logic3
PHL 240Philosophy and the Law3
PHL 241Philosophical Issues in Criminal Law3
PHL 242Philosophical Issues in Civil Law3
PHL 243Philosophical Issues in Constitutional Law3
PHL 292Introduction to Ethics3
PSC 101Intro American Politics3
PY 101Intro To Psychology3

The pre-law program adviser is the primary adviser for students who have an interest in pre-law. Once a student has formally declared an academic major, the pre-law adviser is available as a secondary source to assist specifically with issues related to pre-law preparation.

Mission

The College of Arts and Sciences is central to the instructional, research and outreach missions of The University of Alabama.

The college provides the fundamental liberal arts foundation necessary to the education of all UA students. It is dedicated to educating individuals based on the liberal arts philosophy of making each student a lifelong learner.

The college is committed to leadership in pedagogical innovation and the use of technology to further student learning. It values the traditional residential campus and is dedicated to providing an array of stimulating learning communities where students may grow personally and intellectually. The discovery and sharing of knowledge is at the heart of our enterprise. The College is committed to leadership in the creation, dissemination and application of knowledge and the preparation of future scholars. It accomplishes this by maintaining and enhancing both its nationally competitive faculty and its nationally ranked graduate and undergraduate programs.

Learning and quality of life are interrelated. As the state's largest liberal arts college, the College of Arts and Sciences is central to the cultural, intellectual and social life on campus and in the community, state and region. It contributes fundamentally to the economic development of the state through teaching, creative activity, research and outreach.

The college holds to the principle that knowledge must serve humanity and the environment, and it is dedicated to global responsibility, justice and ethics.

Special Emphases

Learner-Centered College

The College of Arts and Sciences centers its considerable human and technological resources on the individual student and that student's learning. In the Mathematics Technology Learning Center, students use computer-based instruction to learn at a pace suited to their individual needs. Technology used in other courses encourages active, not passive, interaction with course materials. The college seeks to educate self-reliant young men and women who know themselves and contribute significantly to their professions and communities.

Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity

Undergraduate students in the college have remarkable access to opportunities for research and creative activities under the guidance of faculty members. The opportunity to move from synthesizing information and ideas generated by others to creating new ways of knowing is a remarkable intellectual leap and one that many students in the College of Arts and Sciences take. The college sponsors undergraduate research days that encourage students to share their experiences.

Blount Undergraduate Initiative

Endowed by Winton and Carolyn Blount and assisted by many other donors, the Blount Undergraduate Initiative is a four-year program offering students in the College of Arts and Sciences a unique opportunity for an enriched liberal arts education in a lively and enjoyable community of scholars. All entering freshmen in the college, regardless of their academic interests, are eligible to apply for admission. With courses and other activities, the program emphasizes the connectedness of knowledge and the importance of faculty-student learning partnerships. See the Blount Undergraduate Initiative section of this catalog.

Interdisciplinary Study

Virtually all of the programs of study in the College of Arts and Sciences emphasize interdisciplinary study. Whether a student's interest is American studies, studio art or biology, the ability to draw together learning from different fields, to integrate it and to use it later to analyze and solve problems in one's profession, community and own life is the key characteristic of a liberally educated person. Interdisciplinary learning is especially important to students' experiences in New College. New College seminars, which are open to all students, and the New College depth studies are hands-on experiences with interdisciplinary learning.

Learning Communities

Any sense that a student is "just a number" evaporates in a learning community. In the College of Arts and Sciences, these take different forms, with some being residential communities and others not, but all fuse common academic experiences with out-of-class community. The college emphasizes the importance of these, especially for freshman students.

International Education

Citizenship is global. As the College prepares students for citizenship, this is emphasized across the curriculum. While the College has strong language programs, including the unique Critical Languages program in which students can study many of the world's diverse languages, global citizenship affects all of the disciplines. College of Arts and Sciences faculty lead many of the University's summer study abroad programs and direct semester-long programs for students in the college.

Academic Exploration

Many students enter the College of Arts and Sciences undecided about their academic direction. Students are encouraged to explore the resources of the College and the University during their first several semesters in order to make informed choices. The University's General Education Requirement, which includes every introductory course in the disciplines of the college, allows students to meet degree requirements while determining those fields of study that best fit with their talents and passions.

Pre-professional Preparation

Many College of Arts and Sciences graduates go on to medical school, law school, dental or optometry school, physical or occupational therapy programs or other health-related or professional study. Arts and Sciences majors receive excellent preparation for all of these programs, and the College's pre-professional advising programs are very supportive. Student organizations, including Alpha Epsilon Delta, the pre-medical honorary, of which UA is the Alpha chapter, are also important parts of pre-professional preparation.

Faculty

Administrative Officers
  • Robert F. Olin
  • Lisa Dorr
  • Luoheng Han
  • Robert E. Hayes III
  • Tricia McElroy
  • Roger Sidje
Administrative and Professional Staff
  • Cynthia H. Channell
  • Matt Chenault
  • Katie Craig
  • Marian Denham
  • Pamela Derrick
  • Timothy Dillard
  • Cathy Elliott
  • Todd Engelhardt
  • Rebecca Paul Florence
  • Don S. Hays
  • Ginger Hudson
  • Rob Larocco
  • Wendy K. McMillian
  • Nancy T. Shockley
  • Latandra Smith
  • Jeannie Thomley
  • James Vail
  • Allison S. Verhine
  • John Wingard
  • Kathy Yarbrough