New College Courses

NEW
100
FCMP
Hours
1-2
Intro Interdisc Integratv Stdy

Designed to help New College students become more informed about the University and about New College so that they may maximize their opportunities in their undergraduate programs through New College. Enrollment is limited to New College students.

Freshman Compass
NEW
120
Hours
1
Inclusive Leadership Through Sustained Dialogue

In an increasingly globalized world, leaders need the skills to resolve conflict across difference. Sustained Dialogue is a five-stage dialogue-to-action model that requires participants to take the time to focus first on transforming change-blocking relationships, and then on solving problems. This course will explore the theory behind this innovative model and ultimately consider how Sustained Dialogue applies to visions for positive change at the University of Alabama. Participants will receive an introduction to the Sustained Dialogue model and then meet in dialogue groups weekly to work through the 5 stages to address specific issues on campus.

Prerequisite(s): NONE
NEW
122
Hours
2
Academic Potential

This course will help students develop practical and efficient strategies for learning in order to succeed in college. Students will learn skills to improve note taking, listening, textbook reading, and time management; as well as methods to reduce text anxiety and improve concentration. Discussion of campus resources and learning styles will also be included in this course.

Prerequisite(s): none
NEW
140
SB
Hours
3
Sexuality and Society

American society today features more cultural acceptance and legal protection than ever before for sexual and gender diversity, but we don’t always know how to live out these changing norms and how to talk about controversial sexual material in the public sphere. This course engages debates around sexuality as central to human behavior and to social structures, in both America and the world. It provides an overview of the “new sexual revolution” and the growing interdisciplinary field of sexuality studies. The course adopts a consent-based model of sexual wellbeing. Its approach is sex-positive—aiming toward sexual justice, responsibility, and pleasure—within a classroom that functions as an open and affirming space for discussion and learning. Students gain the knowledge, critical thinking skills, and cultural competence to evaluate for themselves issues of sexuality in society.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
NEW
201
Hours
1
Recreation For Life

In this course (designed by the student and his or her advisor using the out-of-class learning contract), the student agrees to participate in some form of physical activity that might result in a lifelong interest. These include jogging, swimming, cycling, etc. This course will frequently include a reading requirement relating to the activity.

NEW
211
HU
Hours
4
Perspectives in the Humanities

Introductory course in the humanities (art, literature, music, etc.) with a focus on problem solving, risk taking and communication. Human behavior and writing skills are stressed.

Humanities
NEW
212
FA, HU
Hours
4
Creativity

This interdisciplinary seminar uses creativity as an organizing principle. Human culture and consciousness are explored through reading, writing, the arts, projects, studios, and discussion.

Fine Arts, Humanities
NEW
213
FA, HU, UH
Hours
4
Honors Creativity

This honors interdisciplinary seminar uses creativity as an organizing principle. Human culture and consciousness are explored through reading, writing, the arts, projects, studios, and discussion.

Fine Arts, Humanities, University Honors
NEW
215
HU
Hours
4
Perspec. on Env. Literature

Considers perspectives on environmental studies within the humanities by examining key texts of environmental literature.

Humanities
NEW
216
FA
Hours
4
Digital Making: Creativity and Computers

This fine arts seminar uses creative work with digital tools as its organizing principle. Human culture, the creative process, and creative expression are explored through written texts, digital media, research, oral and written reports, journals, and individual and group projects. The class goal is to gain a deeper understanding of creativity, innovation and interdisciplinarity in the arts by using computer technology to make creative work. Students will learn through research, hands-on work on creative projects and collaborative work with peers.

Fine Arts
NEW
223
Hours
1
Mcnair Scholar'S Seminar

To provide knowledge and skills in a variety of areas to strengthen personal, academic, and research competencies vital to success in graduate programs.

NEW
226
Hours
4
Organic Farming

An intensive, hands-on course in organic farming taught at a local working farm. Covers the basics of organic farming while also addressing questions about organic versus industrial agriculture models in relation to current environmental problems and solutions.

NEW
230
Hours
4
Environmental Studies

This course engages students in the study of environmental problems and solutions. It includes an examination of fundamental assumptions about the ethical human-nature relation and of how to value nature. The approach is interdisciplinary, drawing on the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences.

NEW
237
SB
Hours
4
Social Problems and Social Change

This seminar explores significant social problems in contemporary society and the complex ways in which social change occurs. Students investigate and seek solutions for current social problems. This course has a 12 hour service-learning component.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
NEW
238
SB, UH
Hours
4
Social Problems and Social Change

This honors seminar explores significant social problems in contemporary society and the complex ways in which social change occurs. Students investigate and seek solutions to current social problems. This course has a service learning component that may involve 12 service learning hours outside of class time.

Social and Behavioral Sciences, University Honors
NEW
243
N
Hours
4
Interdisciplinary Sciences

This seminar demonstrates how the nature of the laboratory experience plays an essential role in the understanding and advancement of science. Several multidisciplinary experiments are performed in geology, chemistry, physics, and biology.

Natural Science
NEW
270
Hours
3
Leader Soc Justice Activism

This course introduces students to the leadership principles that have been effective in bringing about major cultural reforms. Students will explore the methods by which reformers have addressed social injustice. The goal of the course is to: 1) prepare self-reflective students equipped with an awareness of national and international social justice initiatives; and 2) develop an understanding of the methods by which cultural change occurs. Throughout the course, students will have the opportunity to explore the issues that they value and the role leadership serves in voicing those values.

NEW
273
SB
Hours
4
Social Issues & Ethics

This seminar is designed to develop an awareness of the methodologies and concerns of the social sciences as they relate to ethical inquiry. The primary focus is on the nature of inquiry and models for the analysis of ethical issues confronting the modern world. Students will explore the complexity of moral dilemmas and effective societal responses to competing moral obligations in the areas of health care, socio-economic disparities, affirmative action, immigration, and racism.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
NEW
300
Hours
3
Outdoor Leadership

The goal of this course is to prepare students to successfully and safely plan and lead small group excursions into wilderness, backcountry, and front-country outdoor areas using various outdoor recreational activities as a medium. There will also be an emphasis placed on teaching technique and presentation skills as students will be required to present information to the class.

Prerequisite(s): none
NEW
310
Hours
1-15
Independent Study

A student desiring to pursue an academic interest for which no University class is available may plan his or her own "course" through Out-of-Class Learning. A contract, or agreement, with New College is prepared by the student, in which the student identifies a variety of features of the proposed study: its goals and objectives, the methodology and resources to be employed in the attempt to meet the goals and objectives, and the procedure by which the study will be evaluated upon its completion. The process of preparing the contract should be in cooperation with the New College office, from which contract forms may be procured, and with a faculty member or other authority qualified to assist and assess the study. Credit hours awarded for Out-of-Class Learning are available, relative to the breadth or depth of the study, and subject to approval of the advisor to the study and director of the New College.

NEW
311
Hours
1-12
Independent Study

A student desiring to pursue an academic interest for which no University class is available may plan his or her own "course" through Out-of-Class Learning. A contract, or agreement, with New College is prepared by the student, in which the student identifies a variety of features of the proposed study: its goals and objectives, the methodology and resources to be employed in the attempt to meet the goals and objectives, and the procedure by which the study will be evaluated upon its completion. The process of preparing the contract should be in cooperation with the New College office, from which contract forms may be procured, and with a faculty member or other authority qualified to assist and assess the study. Credit hours awarded for Out-of-Class Learning are available, relative to the breadth or depth of the study, and subject to approval of the advisor to the study and director of the New College.

NEW
312
Hours
1-12
Independent Study

A student desiring to pursue an academic interest for which no University class is available may plan his or her own "course" through Out-of-Class Learning. A contract, or agreement, with New College is prepared by the student, in which the student identifies a variety of features of the proposed study: its goals and objectives, the methodology and resources to be employed in the attempt to meet the goals and objectives, and the procedure by which the study will be evaluated upon its completion. The process of preparing the contract should be in cooperation with the New College office, from which contract forms may be procured, and with a faculty member or other authority qualified to assist and assess the study. Credit hours awarded for Out-of-Class Learning are available, relative to the breadth or depth of the study, and subject to approval of the advisor to the study and director of the New College.

NEW
313
Hours
1-12
Independent Study

A student desiring to pursue an academic interest for which no University class is available may plan his or her own "course" through Out-of-Class Learning. A contract, or agreement, with New College is prepared by the student, in which the student identifies a variety of features of the proposed study: its goals and objectives, the methodology and resources to be employed in the attempt to meet the goals and objectives, and the procedure by which the study will be evaluated upon its completion. The process of preparing the contract should be in cooperation with the New College office, from which contract forms may be procured, and with a faculty member or other authority qualified to assist and assess the study. Credit hours awarded for Out-of-Class Learning are available, relative to the breadth or depth of the study, and subject to approval of the advisor to the study and director of the New College.

NEW
314
Hours
1-12
Independent Study

A student desiring to pursue an academic interest for which no University class is available may plan his or her own "course" through Out-of-Class Learning. A contract, or agreement, with New College is prepared by the student, in which the student identifies a variety of features of the proposed study: its goals and objectives, the methodology and resources to be employed in the attempt to meet the goals and objectives, and the procedure by which the study will be evaluated upon its completion. The process of preparing the contract should be in cooperation with the New College office, from which contract forms may be procured, and with a faculty member or other authority qualified to assist and assess the study. Credit hours awarded for Out-of-Class Learning are available, relative to the breadth or depth of the study, and subject to approval of the advisor to the study and director of the New College.

NEW
315
Hours
1-12
Independent Study

A student desiring to pursue an academic interest for which no University class is available may plan his or her own "course" through Out-of-Class Learning. A contract, or agreement, with New College is prepared by the student, in which the student identifies a variety of features of the proposed study: its goals and objectives, the methodology and resources to be employed in the attempt to meet the goals and objectives, and the procedure by which the study will be evaluated upon its completion. The process of preparing the contract should be in cooperation with the New College office, from which contract forms may be procured, and with a faculty member or other authority qualified to assist and assess the study. Credit hours awarded for Out-of-Class Learning are available, relative to the breadth or depth of the study, and subject to approval of the advisor to the study and director of the New College.

NEW
316
Hours
1-12
Independent Study

A student desiring to pursue an academic interest for which no University class is available may plan his or her own "course" through Out-of-Class Learning. A contract, or agreement, with New College is prepared by the student, in which the student identifies a variety of features of the proposed study: its goals and objectives, the methodology and resources to be employed in the attempt to meet the goals and objectives, and the procedure by which the study will be evaluated upon its completion. The process of preparing the contract should be in cooperation with the New College office, from which contract forms may be procured, and with a faculty member or other authority qualified to assist and assess the study. Credit hours awarded for Out-of-Class Learning are available, relative to the breadth or depth of the study, and subject to approval of the advisor to the study and director of the New College.

NEW
317
Hours
1-12
Independent Study

A student desiring to pursue an academic interest for which no University class is available may plan his or her own "course" through Out-of-Class Learning. A contract, or agreement, with New College is prepared by the student, in which the student identifies a variety of features of the proposed study: its goals and objectives, the methodology and resources to be employed in the attempt to meet the goals and objectives, and the procedure by which the study will be evaluated upon its completion. The process of preparing the contract should be in cooperation with the New College office, from which contract forms may be procured, and with a faculty member or other authority qualified to assist and assess the study. Credit hours awarded for Out-of-Class Learning are available, relative to the breadth or depth of the study, and subject to approval of the advisor to the study and director of the New College.

NEW
318
Hours
1-12
Independent Study

A student desiring to pursue an academic interest for which no University class is available may plan his or her own "course" through Out-of-Class Learning. A contract, or agreement, with New College is prepared by the student, in which the student identifies a variety of features of the proposed study: its goals and objectives, the methodology and resources to be employed in the attempt to meet the goals and objectives, and the procedure by which the study will be evaluated upon its completion. The process of preparing the contract should be in cooperation with the New College office, from which contract forms may be procured, and with a faculty member or other authority qualified to assist and assess the study. Credit hours awarded for Out-of-Class Learning are available, relative to the breadth or depth of the study, and subject to approval of the advisor to the study and director of the New College.

NEW
319
Hours
1-12
Independent Study

A student desiring to pursue an academic interest for which no University class is available may plan his or her own "course" through Out-of-Class Learning. A contract, or agreement, with New College is prepared by the student, in which the student identifies a variety of features of the proposed study: its goals and objectives, the methodology and resources to be employed in the attempt to meet the goals and objectives, and the procedure by which the study will be evaluated upon its completion. The process of preparing the contract should be in cooperation with the New College office, from which contract forms may be procured, and with a faculty member or other authority qualified to assist and assess the study. Credit hours awarded for Out-of-Class Learning are available, relative to the breadth or depth of the study, and subject to approval of the advisor to the study and director of the New College.

NEW
321
Hours
1-12
Independent Study

A student desiring to pursue an academic interest for which no University class is available may plan his or her own "course" through Out-of-Class Learning. A contract, or agreement, with New College is prepared by the student, in which the student identifies a variety of features of the proposed study: its goals and objectives, the methodology and resources to be employed in the attempt to meet the goals and objectives, and the procedure by which the study will be evaluated upon its completion. The process of preparing the contract should be in cooperation with the New College office, from which contract forms may be procured, and with a faculty member or other authority qualified to assist and assess the study. Credit hours awarded for Out-of-Class Learning are available, relative to the breadth or depth of the study, and subject to approval of the advisor to the study and director of the New College.

NEW
332
W
Hours
3
Experimental Music

This course will introduce you to a variety of theories and practices of musical experimentalism in a global context. We’ll begin by defining what experimental music is – what is the impulse that drives some artists to push outside the realms of their traditions, or even outside what is normally called music? Rather than limiting our view to experimentalism in Western art music, as has largely been the case in surveys of this subject, we will also listen to and study experiments in jazz, rock, hip hop, reggae and other global musics to put the experimentalist aesthetic in a broad historical and cultural context. In addition to critical reading, discussion and listening we will perform experimental music compositions to encourage a “hands-on” engagement with the subject. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Prerequisite(s): N/A
Writing
NEW
333
Hours
9-15
CIEL Internship

This course serves as the course students register for as part of the exchange program with the Consoritum for Innovative Environment in Learning. Students pay tuition to UA but actually study as a full-time student at one of the 12 CIEL sister institutions.

NEW
334
Hours
3
Everyday Forestry in Alabama

This course will prepare students to understand natural resource practices to better manage one’s woodlands in a rural or urban situation. This course is for any student interested in basic forestry management techniques and should serve future home and land owners, individuals interested in conservation issues, and as an introduction to a broader field for students with professional interest in forestry or environmental studies. This course will discuss basic forest management concepts in order to improve the woodland’s habitat according to the objectives of a landowner. Students will learn how to identify all major tree species in Alabama as well as all major forest insects and diseases. Other topics that will be discussed will include compass and pacing, forest site evaluation, timber estimation, topographic map interpretation, and invasive woodland species. This course does not presuppose any previous knowledge and no prerequisite is required. Much of this course will include “hands-on” outdoor field trips.

Prerequisite(s): None
NEW
335
Hours
3
Everyday Wildlife In Alabama

The goal for this course is to prepare students to understand creative uses of managing wildlife species according to management objectives. This course is intended for any student interested in basic wildlife management techniques and should serve future home and land owners, individuals interested in conservation issues, and as an introduction to a broader field for students with professional interest in environmental studies or natural resources. This course does not presuppose any previous knowledge and no prerequisite is required.

Prerequisite(s): none
NEW
337
Hours
3
Designing and Maintaining a Sustainable Home Landscape

The purpose of this course is to prepare and encourage students to incorporate the principles of sustainability and the ethics of permaculture into their home or apartment landscape. This course is intended for any student interested in learning the basics of sustainable gardening, water management, pest management, and the use of native plants to provide a backyard habitat for birds and wildlife. No prerequisite is required.

Prerequisite(s): none
NEW
338
Hours
2
New College Review I

This workshop provides students with practical experience in writing and publishing a special interest publication, the New College Review. Students gain experience in thematic approaches to a publication, concept formation for an audience, socially responsible publishing, and writing and editing persuasive essays. Students are strongly encouraged to take both.

NEW
339
Hours
2
New College Review II

This workshop provides students with practical experience in writing and publishing a special interest publication, the New College Review. Students edit, design, and distribute the New College Review. Students are strongly encouraged to take both NEW 338 and NEW 339 in sequence.

NEW
342
Hours
3
Social Action and Performance

Social Action and Performance is open to all students. The course uses an interdisciplinary approach to the world of theatrical performance and explores the work of Augusto Boal and Theatre of the Oppressed model as a mechanism for social change. The course will train students to educate their peers through performance about interpersonal violence and contemporary issues of multiculturalism on campus. Students will use improvisation, participatory activities, readings, and assessments to engage in social action. Students are encouraged to participate in self-exploration with respect to the issues mentioned above as part of their trainings with these techniques. Students who participate in this course will become official members of the theatre troupe called Unscripted.

Prerequisite(s): (EN 101 and EN 102) or EN 103
NEW
360
W
Hours
3
Sound Studies

How do we experience, define, use and abuse sound? What elements of a sound determine their meaning to us, and why? What can we learn about the world by focusing on its sounds? An emerging interdisciplinary field of research, sound studies asks these questions and more, in an attempt to uncover the important role of sound in our lives. Why do shopping malls sound like they do? What do cellphone ringtones tell you about a person? How has the changing soundscape of the ocean affected natural processes and wildlife? Why do clocktower bells ring? How is music used to both soothe, entertain, and torture or control people? This interdisciplinary course explores sound in a variety of current and historical global contexts – of which music is only one small part – examining the many ways sound signifies and defines our cultures and histories. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Prerequisite(s): N/A
Writing
NEW
365
Hours
3
Introduction to Environmental Policy

This introductory environmental policy course reviews major developments in environmental regulation in the United States, considered in a global context. Readings examine the evolution of U.S. environmental policy, the form and function of social institutions used to govern human-environment interactions, including markets, state and civil society, and conventions, norms, and morals. U.S. and U.N. legal structures, agencies, and NGOs are addressed, with attention to comparative regulatory frameworks. The “new institutional approach,” “resource regimes,” and various incremental and transformative institutional reforms are discussed. The impact of economic and cultural factors—including class, race, gender, and location—on resource use and other policy decisions affecting the physical and built environments will be explored. Evolving institutional approaches to energy use, such as sustainability, “wise use,” adaptive management, and resilience are examined. This course is cross-listed with PSC 365.

Prerequisite(s): No prerequisites.
NEW
366
Hours
3
Waterways

This experiential seminar explores the natural history and ecology of our waterways, and examines the human dimensions of control and management, including policies and regulations to support environmental and human uses. Through readings, discussions, films, and field trips, we will explore the natural beauty and diversity of our aquatic ecosystems, and the ways in which we interact with our environment, both positively and negatively. In addition, we will examine current threats and impacts that development, pollution, and management have on our waterways, and consider policies designed to regulate or mitigate these impacts. This course includes field trips, some of which may occur outside of the regularly scheduled class period.

NEW
399
Hours
3
Civic Leadership Dialogues

A 2016 Pew Research study found that the political polarization in the U.S. continues to deepen and grow more hostile, and the widening economic disparities predicted by the July 2019 McKinsey Global Institute report The Future of Work in America are likely to further accentuate our national divides. In response to these alarming trends, this course takes an innovative approach to prepare students to be citizens more capable of addressing a politically divisive environment, locally and globally. Serving as a civic learning “laboratory,” the Civic Leadership Dialogues offer students the opportunity to acquire the “democratic knowledge and capabilities” that can only be “honed through hands-on, face-to-face, active engagement.”.

NEW
400
Hours
3
Sporting Conservation

This course is designed to provide students with an historical and contemporary understanding of the role that sportsmen and women play in the conservation and management of fish, game, and non-game species. Special attention will be given to sporting organizations and their role in the conservation and management of our nation’s natural resources. This course will also introduce students to important concepts within the wildlife and game management fields such as predator control, population dynamics, predator-prey relations, and introductory genetics.

NEW
401
Hours
4
Birds and Birding

This course will introduce students to the popular hobby of birding or bird watching. As such, basic field identification methods will be reviewed and practiced. We will also discuss larger conservation issues as they relate to birds. As we will learn, the phrase “canary in a coal mine” has very practical implication for the modern terrestrial world. We will also discuss the cultural connection between people and birds, and what that has meant for both the destruction and conservation of birds during the past couple of centuries.

NEW
403
W
Hours
4
Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Global Health

This seminar explores global health from the perspective of multiple disciplines and from a number of geographic scales from the local to the global. Collectively students will examine major global health determinants, challenges, programs and policies. Students will analyze past, current and emerging global health priorities with a focus on emerging infectious diseases, chronic disease burden in both the developed and developing worlds, health systems across the world, major global health initiatives, and health inequity with associated challenges such as poverty and conflict. This course will contain a heavy focus on case studies and experiential learning, including field trips and service learning activities. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Writing
NEW
407
W
Hours
3
Landscapes of the South

A study of environmental and cultural landscapes of the American South, as altered and used by successive waves of native peoples, explorers, immigrants, laborers, industrialists, and urban builders, addressing historical and contemporary environmental challenges. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Writing
NEW
411
Hours
3
So You Like To Write: A Writing Workshop Open to All Genres

Are you passionate about your writing? This New College seminar provides a supportive space for writers of all abilities to work on their own projects. The workshop provides friendly peer review and group study of the craft of writing. We’ll learn about the publishing industry from visiting authors, editors, and agents. Invited genres include: science fiction and fantasy; fanfiction, children’s literature and young adult, poetry; song lyrics, erotica and romance, film and TV treatments and scripts, memoir and creative nonfiction (travel writing, science writing, food writing, etc.), devotional or inspirational writing, general fiction (in short story and novel form), graphic novels, experimental form and fiction, and more.

NEW
412
W
Hours
4
Songwriting Workshop

This songwriting workshop focuses on how songs are made. After a brief study of various popular song genres (e.g., blues, troubadour, folk) students will produce their own songs. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Writing
NEW
415
W
Hours
3
Gender, Sexuality &Pop Culture

What constitutes "femininity" and "masculinity" in 21st century America? How have gender roles changed? Is gender performance? What are the cultural expectations around sexuality, and how is it influenced and policed in society? Includes professor's current case research in this field. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Writing
NEW
416
W
Hours
3
American Environmental Thought

Popular conceptions of nature hold extraordinary power in shaping our responses and policies toward both the geophysical world and built environments. This interdisciplinary course examines key concepts and controversies in American thought about nature since before colonization. Using accounts from various regions, the course explores evolving conceptions of nature and justice, competing claims about race and class, and changing institutional responses and remedies to environmental degradation in the context of global change. The course is highly interactive, inviting critical thinking about the human place in the physical world. We read and discuss ecological views as presented in colonial writings, slave narratives, Transcendentalist thought, Gilded Age preservationist and conservationist debates, and the work of Progressive Era occupational health specialists and ecologists. We give specific attention to twentieth century social movements for environmental public health, examining contemporary approaches, including eco-feminism, environmental justice, and sustainability. We identify different disciplinary approaches, among them environmental history, ecological anthropology, sociology, and geography, and explore conceptual links between disciplines. A brief introduction to research methods, utilizing qualitative techniques, case studies, and specialized data sources, will be included. Journal articles, law review essays, regulatory documents, court decisions, and films supplement classic texts as we examine race, ethnicity, gender, poverty, and other factors shaping environmental health. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Writing
NEW
418
W
Hours
3
Mash-Up: Intermedia Intersections in the Arts

This interdisciplinary course discusses intermedia intersections in 20th and 21st century art and music through lectures, discussions and interactions with visiting artists. We will examine the cultural and historical roots of intermedia art, the outpouring of experimentation in the 20th century avant-garde, and the postmodern pastiche of the digital realm in the 21st century. Spanning work created for galleries, to art and music from urban streets and rural villages, we will explore examples from the visual arts, dance, music, film and architecture to learn how and why artists work with and combine different media. In addition to engaging with a variety of artistic works, we will discuss the cultural, philosophical, theoretical, and compositional issues that meet at intermedia junctions. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Writing
NEW
420
W
Hours
3
Cultural Studies

This seminar provides an introduction to the key concepts, methodologies, and practice of Cultural Studies, focusing primarily on issues of cultural consumption, representation, audience, identity, and everyday life. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Writing
NEW
422
W
Hours
3
Girls' Studies

This interdisciplinary seminar introduces students to the key debates, concepts, and questions raised by the emerging field of Girls’ Studies. The course will examine the history and social construction of girlhood in the 20th and 21st centuries, as well as draw on girls’ lived experiences, activism, and cultural productions, in order to challenge established definitions of “girls” and “girlhood.” Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Writing
NEW
434
Hours
3
Documenting Justice I

Interdisciplinary course in ethnographic filmmaking, focusing particularly on analyzing the many dimensions of culture and social experience. Students produce a short documentary film on a story of justice or injustice in Alabama. A two semester course.

NEW
435
Hours
3
Documenting Justice II

Interdisciplinary course in ethnographic filmmaking, focusing particularly on analyzing the many dimensions of culture and social experience. Students produce a short documentary film on a story of justice or injustice in Alabama. A two semester course.

Prerequisite(s): NEW 434
NEW
436
W
Hours
4
Public Leadership

This seminar helps students develop the understanding and skills necessary for the practice of public leadership. The course emphasizes framing public issues for discussion and leading the decision making necessary to set the direction of public policy. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Writing
NEW
438
W
Hours
4
Overview of American Law

This course will teach students key components of the American legal system using popular literature, current events, and academic readings. Through written assignments, presentations, and discussion, students will gain knowledge about various bodies of law, conceptions of law / justice, and the implications of law and American culture on one another. This course will benefit students who plan to attend law school, those considering law school, and those who want to expand their legal literacy. Students will learn concepts relevant to: criminal law, torts, contracts, wills / trusts, constitutional law, and procedure / evidence. Further, students will learn how to write about legal issues using the vocabulary of the domain of knowledge. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Prerequisite(s): None.
Writing
NEW
439
W
Hours
3
Urban Spaces: The Nature of Cities

This interdisciplinary social science course provides an introduction to the cultural and physical ecology of cities, focusing primarily on urbanization in the United States from the late 19th century to the present. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Writing
NEW
441
W
Hours
4
Climate Change Seminar

This seminar introduces students to the science of global climate change and examines public perception and coverage of the topic in various news media outlets, films, and books. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Writing
NEW
442
W
Hours
3
Environmental Ethics and Problems

This upper level writing intensive seminar explores the ethical dimensions of ecological relationships, with particular attention to conceptions of nature, justice, and environmental health. We will consider classical ethical concepts, such as utilitarianism and natural law theories, and contemporary environmental approaches, including biocentrism, deep ecology, environmental justice, eco-feminism, and sustainability. This course will be highly interactive, inviting critical thinking about changing ideas about the human place in the natural world. Examining various case studies, we explore the ethical debates surrounding such topics as populations, genetically altered crops, global climate change, biodiversity, and emerging crises in global environmental public health. Readings also address corporate responsibility, science ethics, and public policy. We will consider the ethics of sustainability from the campus to the transnational level. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course. The course has New College designations for Environment, Sustainability, and Conservation (ESC) and Social Problems and Social Change (SPSC).

Writing
NEW
445
W
Hours
3
Technology and Humans

This interdisciplinary seminar provides an introduction to the key debates and questions raised by the increasingly close relationship between humans and advanced technologies. The course will draw on critical works, as well as narrative fiction and popular culture texts, to examine how a dependence on technology might change the very definition of "human" and what subsequent ethical, psychological, and philosophical dilemmas result from this close relationship. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Writing
NEW
450
Hours
6
Conservation Field Studies in Belize

Study Belize’s diverse rainforests, coral reefs, and visit Mayan ruins for a glimpse into a past civilization. Belize is unique in that it still contains relatively undisturbed rainforests and the longest barrier reef in the Western Hemisphere. However, while Belize has emerged as an international leader regarding conservation efforts, threats from climate change, poverty, and development still exist. The purpose of this course is 1) examine current conservation efforts to safeguard this biodiversity; 2) familiarize students with the most important aspects of tropical lowland terrestrial and marine ecosystems; 3) understand the role of local culture in sustainable conservation; 4) gain an understanding of the fundamental importance of biodiversity; and 5) expose students to new and unique cultures and environments. The course is designed for students who are interested in conservation issues, biogeography, marine sciences, ornithology and birding, archaeology, and outdoor adventures! The trip will be divided between a rainforest and a marine field station located next to the barrier reef. So we will have easy access the most diverse environments on the planet.

NEW
472
W
Hours
4
Social Change

This seminar is concerned with the process and analysis of social change. In this seminar, students study the Holocaust, attempting to understand it as an intense and unparalleled human experience. The causes, events, outcomes, and implications are researched through books, films, interviews, tapes, and discussions. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Writing
NEW
473
Hours
4
Globalization & Folk Crft Prod

This course examines the relationship between the global and the local, using world folk craft (for example, pottery) as a point of focus. The functions of creativity in industrialized and nonindustrialized societies are explored through a combination of reading, research, discussion, and studio experiences. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

NEW
474
Hours
4
Survival

In this seminar, students study the nature of human and societal survival under extreme conditions. Topics range from issues of a global nature to violent crime, prejudice, and disease. Causes, effects, and possible solutions are all considered. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

NEW
480
Hours
3
Leadership Practicum

This course offers a practicum experience for students pursuing the Civic Engagement and Leadership minor, New College students pursuing a depth study in an area related to civic engagement and/or leadership, and student leaders with significant campus or community leadership experience. The course will assist students in applying the theoretical knowledge gained in their academic study of civic engagement and leadership to a professional context of their choosing through a carefully designed and implemented leadership project. Upon completion of the leadership practicum, students will submit a portfolio documenting their professional growth as a leader.

Prerequisite(s): NEW 237 or NEW 238 and PHL 292 or NEW 273
NEW
484
Hours
3
Church, State and American Education

A critical look at the role of religion in public education, the separation of church and state in American education, and educational policies emanating from debates about the separation of church and state.

NEW
490
Hours
3-4
Special Topics

The subject matter varies.

NEW
495
Hours
2
Capstone Sem & Senior Project

14 hours of New College coursework and successful junior year review. New College students only, concluding integrative project.

LifeTrack Courses

NCLT
101
Hours
3
Foundations of Adult Learning Seminar

Each prospective LifeTrack student is required to attend the on-campus 2-day Adult Learning Seminar. This seminar includes online work in writing, assessment of computer skills, examining potential for learning outcomes including experiential learning and critical reading and thinking skills.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be fully admitted to the University of Alabama and it must be taken within the first six to nine months of admittance.
NCLT
104
Hours
3
LifeTrack Writing Skills & Strategies

Writing Skills and Strategies reviews writing principles for developing college level essays.

Prerequisite(s): A quality writing sample during on-campus orientation showing college level writing skills and admittance in the New College LifeTrack Program.
NCLT
105
Hours
2
LifeTrack Research Writing

Writing Strategies for Research teaches the fundamentals of researching and writing research papers.

Prerequisite(s): NCLT 104 with a C or higher
NCLT
106
Hours
3
LifeTrack Research Writing

Writing Strategies for Research teaches the fundamentals of researching and writing research papers.

Prerequisite(s): NCLT 104 with a C or higher
NCLT
201
Hours
3
Learning Skills for Adults

The purpose of this course is to allow students to gain an understanding of basic learning principles and strategies to improve adult students’ study and learning skills. It provides an opportunity for adult students to develop their own methods of using the strategies and skills they learn to become more effective, involved, and productive workers in their educational experiences and journey.

NCLT
203
Hours
3
Analytical Thinking From Experience

This three hour course will equip students with the tools necessary to utilize the application of critical thinking. It provides a series development of experiential learning assessment. The course also guides students through the preparation and compilation of components required for prior learning assessment portfolio evaluation. After completion of the course, students may choose to submit a portfolio for evaluation by faculty assessor (fee required).

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
205
Hours
3
Professional & Academic Use of the Internet

To introduce the student to the social, legal, and ethical issues related to the use of social media and other Internet technologies in professional and academic settings. The widespread use of technology, including social media, has changed the way we make decisions, communicate, and interact with colleagues, instructors, peers, and others. These changes continue to contribute to new social and legal issues that demand a critical examination. The course also focuses on the potential of social media and other Internet sources as research tool.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course
NCLT
206
Hours
3
Theories of Career Development

This course examines approaches to career development such as: Personality Theory of Career Choice, Trait Factor, Psychological, Decision – Situational or Sociological, Developmental, the theory of work-adjustment, Holland’s Theory of Vocational Personalities in Work Environment, the Self-concept Theory of Career Development, the Theory of Circumscription and Compromise, and Social Cognitive Career Theory.

NCLT
207
Hours
3
Introduction to Personality Styles

This course covers a variety of personality theories including the theoretical and scientific explanations for individuals' characteristic patterns of perception, thought, emotion and behavior. Emphasizes the understanding and mastery of personality constructs applied to students' personal and professional lives.

NCLT
208
Hours
3
Internet: Tool for Communication

This course is to introduce students to the Internet as a method of communicating in both professional and academic settings. The use of the Internet has changed the way we work, play and communicate with others. This course will also focus on several new emerging methods of communicating via the Internet.

NCLT
209
Hours
3
Introduction to Video Gaming: History & Design Considerations

This three credit contract is intended to provide an overview of the history of the digital (including video) game industry and the process of game development and design. Game terminology, platform comparisons, psychological concepts of interactivity, selected motivation theory, and methods of content creation are examined for business, educational, and/or entertainment uses.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
210
Hours
1
Recreation for Life

Recreation for Life is an independent study for New College LifeTrack students interested in engaging in a new physical activity, and developing an exercise routine that they hope to continue on a regular basis for the rest of their lives (hence the name “Recreation for Life”).

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
211
Hours
1
Volunteerism & Community Engagement

This course allows students to engage with community organizations to learn the challenges and rewards of volunteer service. Students are also exposed to various opportunities for civic engagement.

NCLT
212
Hours
1
Experiential Travel

This course will be a student-designed interdisciplinary travel course. It will include the use of materials in the chosen area, work done at a distance and an off-campus visit to a site related to the topic of the course, using interdisciplinary methods of examination, experiential learning and critical thinking and writing.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
213
Hours
1
Lecture Series

This contract is designed to allow students to have an experiential learning experience based on their attendance of either an on-campus extra-course event (lecture based) and follow through with a research project based on the analysis of said event.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
220
Hours
3
Gateway: Introduction to the Arts

This course will introduce students to the function, value, and character of the arts in our everyday lives. It will give students the opportunity to consider the value of the arts in their own development as a person, a student, and as a professional. This course may function a little differently from other courses you take at the University of Alabama. The goal is to push students out into various art communities: formal and informal, professional and student, local and global. Students are encouraged to develop for themselves the resources necessary to make thoughtful decisions about their future with the arts as consumers, practitioners, citizens, leaders, critics, students, skeptics towards the arts, and lovers of the arts.

Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in the New College LifeTrack Program.
NCLT
225
Hours
4
Gateway Science: Tripping over Science

In this course, students will learn about different types of science, primarily natural sciences, and how they relate to other disciplines. What does cooking have to do with chemistry? How is ecology related to economics? Students will also do a final paper connecting multiple science disciplines back to a project or event in their own community.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
230
Hours
3
Gateway: Intro to Social Sciences

This course is to introduce students to the Social Sciences, their methods, and the major areas of study.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling in this course.
NCLT
235
Hours
3
Gateway: Introduction to Leadership

This course is meant to give the student an understanding of leadership through studying theories and current topics that addresses the concept of leadership and to be able to identify effective leadership styles.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
236
Hours
1
Topics in Professional Discourse

This course offers four different possible sections that each explore different topics related to professional discourse including the sending and receiving of information between two or more people and the interaction in varying relational situations such as between co-workers, clients, and superiors and subordinates. The course requires significant writing and evaluation of discourse.

NCLT
301
Hours
3
The Creative Writing Process

The overall purpose of this course is to introduce the beginning student to the fundamentals of creative writing (primarily fiction) through a series of reading assignments and writing exercises.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
308
Hours
3
Advanced Fiction Writing

To further refine and sharpen creative writing skills and techniques introduced in "The Creative Writing Process" course.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
309
Hours
3
Manuscript Development & Preparation

A continuation of the Advanced Fiction contract, this contract will allow the student to complete a manuscript in creative writing, i.e., a collection of stories, a novella, or a novel, as part of a Senior Project in Creative Writing.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
312
Hours
1-3
Special Topics in Literature & Film

This course will examine various topics through literature and film. Topics may include a range of genres such as: American Comedy, The American South, American Crime, The American Hero, The 1960s, Decades of Lit & Film, and Best Sellers/Blockbusters.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
313
Hours
1-3
Special Topics in Arts/Humanities

This course will examine various topics in the arts and humanities. The course topics will vary each semester.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
315
Hours
3
The Humanities Experience

This contract is designed to increase the student's understanding and appreciation of several humanities disciplines through a variety of resources (texts, readings and attendance at cultural events) that direct attention to current ethical and cultural issues.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
316
Hours
3
Comparative Mythology

To acquaint students with myth, mythological systems and mythography in relation to the human cultural system through examination of belief systems and rituals in order to explain the actions of others.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
317
Hours
3
Women in Contemporary Culture

Through literary and other readings, the contract introduces students to the women's movement in the 20th Century and to issues associated with female identity and socialization.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
320
Hours
2
Exploring the Creative Process

This seminar uses creativity as its organizing principle. Human culture, the creative process, and creative expression are explored through written examples, audio/video materials, individual and group projects, and interactions with creative individuals. Throughout the semester students will explore and challenge their own creative processes and acquire scholarly knowledge of creativity in a variety of fields.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
321
Hours
3
Music In Our Lives

This course will introduce students to the function, value, and character of music in our everyday lives. Students will consider music in their everyday life and be introduced to music from other genres and cultures. Students will have the opportunity to explore the value of music in their own development as a person, a student, and as a professional.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling in this course.
NCLT
322
Hours
3
Festivals: Local Culture

This course examines local culture as expressed through festivals and public displays of various traditions. Students will attend a range of festivals and learn how to thoroughly describe and analyze the festivals using methods from folklore, cultural anthropology, and performance studies. You will explore festivals through selected reading and viewing materials. You will also attend one festival in or near your community. You will learn about the ways in which arts, music, food, film, heritage, ethnic, and/or religious festivals contribute to and represent local cultures and societies.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
324
Hours
2
Summertime Blues

Looking for a cure for the summertime blues? - Take this course and attend a blues concert or blues festival in Alabama or in your local area. This class will introduce students to the blues and will focus on the development of the blues genre in the southern United States (Mississippi Delta region and Alabama). Student will read about the history of the blues, view a documentary film, and attend a live performance of blues music to learn more about this early musical genre that influenced jazz, rock, popular music, and many other musical styles throughout the 20th and 21st centuries.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
325
Hours
1
Visiting Artist Series

This course will focus on the individual artists and scholars who will be giving guest lectures as part of this series (typically on the University of Alabama campus). This is an excellent opportunity to hear first hand perspectives from highly regarded visual artists and art scholars. The student may choose one artist or all three and complete required assignments for each one. Each mini-mester course will include one assignment prior to the lecture for students to become familiar with the artist and his or her work, one summary/reflection assignment after attending the lecture in person or viewing the lecture online, and one final essay based on the artist's work or scholarship. Distance students who cannot attend the on-campus visit, will be able to view the artist lecture via streaming video.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
330
Hours
1-3
Directed Study in Literature, Art & Society

This course will be designed by the student with the assistance of their Academic Advisor/selected course UA faculty member. It can cover any topic within the area of Literature, Art and other Humanities. It should be interdisciplinary in construction and all elements will be agreed upon between student and course director.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
340
Hours
3
Controversies in Science

This course is online only and will be completed using Blackboard Learn software. Science is often steeped in controversy. Some of this comes from misunderstandings between scientists and non-scientists, while some is a result of bad science. In this course we will look at these different types of controversies to come to a better understanding of what constitutes good science and how to better understand science. Controversies covered include climate change, evolution, human cloning, vaccines, and more.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
341
Hours
3
Designed by Nature: Biomimicry in Our World

It has been said that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. This is becoming increasingly true and obvious as innovative designers and engineers look to a truly original design source for inspiration: nature and life around us. Hence was born the field of ‘Biomimicry’ which imitates elements of nature to solve complex human problems. In this course students will learn about key components of everyday life and their biological -inspired origins. At the end of the course students will put their knowledge to use either researching a biologically inspired item already in use or by developing their own novel biomimetic innovation.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
342
Hours
3
The Science of the Supernatural

The recent explosion of popular entertainment focused on “supernatural” creatures such as vampires and werewolves has done much to reimagine these ever-popular myths. Any particular version of this genre is sure to add its own twist to origination stories and characteristics. Yet where in fact did these legends begin? And more importantly, is there any data supporting these prevailing classics of folklore? In this course students will examine several works of non-fiction that attempt to explain supernatural myths in our everyday lives.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
343
Hours
4
A Look At Environmental Sciences

The world around us is a complicated one. Our lives are governed by natural processes and human technology. Understanding how these processes interact goes a long way towards allowing us to be better citizens. In this course we will explore seven different areas: climate/weather and other natural phenomena, water, energy, pollution, garbage and recycling, agriculture, and biology. This course is online only.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling in this course.
NCLT
344
Hours
1-4
Special Topics in the Natural Sciences

These are instructor designed courses which will explore various topics in the natural sciences.

NCLT
345
Hours
3
Human Biology

In this course, students will learn about what makes up the human body as well as how people fit into the broader environment. Topics will include anatomy, physiology, disease, the microbiome, ecology, and humans as animals.

NCLT
346
Hours
4
Spiders, Snakes, and Dirt

In this course students will learn about human disconnection from and fear of the natural world and the harm this can cause to children and adults alike. The course will cover many phobias that keep people away from nature such as snakes, spiders, and fear of getting dirty. The course will also cover biophilia; the idea that human connection to nature is necessary and beneficial to our well-being.

NCLT
347
Hours
1
Biodiversity Lab

Our world is incredibly diverse in terms of the animals, plants, and other organisms that live here and its geology and other natural features. In this course students will explore this diversity, reasons that it exists, threats to it, and what efforts are being taken to protect it.

NCLT
348
Hours
1
Soil Quality Lab

This one hour course will equip students with the tools necessary to examine the fundamental principles of soil quality and the relationship of soil characteristics to productivity. The student will collect a soil sample from a location of choice to determine local soil quality. The sample will be submitted to the local USDA extension office and obtain a certified soil report (fee required).

NCLT
349
Hours
1
Water Quality Lab

This one hour course will equip students with the tools necessary to examine the fundamental principles of water quality, with particular emphasis on nutrients and the watershed-level approach. The student will collect a freshwater sample from a lake, river, stream, or pond to determine local water quality. The sample will be submitted to the local USDA extension office and obtain a certified water quality report (fee required).

NCLT
355
Hours
1-3
Directed Study Science, Technology & Culture

This course will be designed by the student with the assistance of their Academic Advisor/selected course UA faculty member. It can cover any topic within the area of Science, Technology & Culture. It should be interdisciplinary in construction and all elements will be agreed upon between student and course director.

NCLT
360
Hours
3
Grief and Caregiving

At some point in all of our lives we will reach the new normal of caring for aging parents, grief, and loss of those dear to us. Many travel this road alone. Together we will explore the many areas of our lives where we face what it means to be an adult child, a widower, or a parent who lost a child. The process of aging, caregiving, grief, and loss of a loved one is not a brief space of time. How do we move back to being a part of the living world? How do we move beyond feelings of seemingly unending grief, and begin our lives again?.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
361
Hours
3
Conspiracy Theories

Aliens landed in New Mexico! Elvis did not leave the building! Who shot JFK?! The moon landing was fake! 9/11 was an inside job! AIDS is manmade! RFID chips in your babies! The end is nigh... “It’s the end of the world as we know it and I feel fine” --REM This course will explore a sample of conspiracy theories in United States history. Using written and visual sources (Letters, emails, newspaper, editorial cartoons, speeches, etc.), students will be exposed to the conspiratorial language used by Americans to explain the unexplainable. They will emerge from the course with the ability to analyze sources and identify reasons why conspiracies are started.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
362
Hours
3
Nazi Germany

This seminar explores the rise and fall of the Nazi Party.

NCLT
363
Hours
3
The Glass Ceiling: Women at Work

This class will explore the history and present of women at work. There is a long history of women working in America that includes a wide range of employment from the domestic sphere to the boardroom. Throughout history and presently, the majority of women have not been able to break “the glass ceiling” which refers to an invisible barrier that prevents someone from achieving further success. It is most often heard in the context of women who cannot advance to the highest levels of power in the workplace. This also affects women based on race and socioeconomic status. The glass ceiling is a way of describing whatever keeps women from achieving power and success equal to that of men. We will look at the past and the present of working women, the challenges they face and decisions they make along the way.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
364
Hours
3
Cemeteries and Local History

To become familiar with the local history of a community by studying its burial spaces.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
365
Hours
3
Cooperation and Conflict

This course explores cooperation and conflict in human society. We will investigate these ideas within conflicts around race, gender, class, immigration, poverty, etc. Students will investigate and seek solutions to contemporary social problems found within these areas. Specific themes will include economic citizenship, healthcare, and environmentalism. The Socratic imperative that “The unexamined life is not worth living,” will be central to this class. We must strive to interrogate who each of us, as i ndividuals, are in relation to various examples of social conflict. For example, in terms of conflicts surrounding race, we must each ask ourselves, “How do I participate in race?” The same goes for conflicts surrounding immigration, poverty, class, gender, etc. By asking such questions, we can then discuss how we as individuals, in the “everyday”, contribute to conflict as well as how we can contribute to cooperation.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
366
Hours
3
Juvenile Delinquency & Justice

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a general knowledge and understanding of the problems stemming from delinquency which plague society, theoretical explanations for delinquent behavior, and how juvenile delinquents are processed through the criminal justice system.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
367
Hours
3
Terrorism and Homeland Security

The courses provides students with a better understanding of what terrorism is, its origins and its purpose, and the steps used to combat it.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
368
Hours
3
Global Perspectives of Women

This course will develop understanding and sympathy for women's lives and experiences around the globe. It will increase the students knowledge of history and culture as well as reading, analytical and writing skills.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
369
Hours
1-3
Special Topics in the Social Sciences

This course will examine various topics in the social sciences. The course topics will vary each semester.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
374
Hours
1-3
Directed Study in Community Studies

This course will be designed by the student with the assistance of their Academic Advisor/selected course UA faculty member. It can cover any topic within the area of Community Studies. It should be interdisciplinary in construction and all elements will be agreed upon between student and course director.

NCLT
375
Hours
1-3
Directed Study in Social Sciences

This course will be designed by the student with the assistance of their Academic Advisor/selected course UA faculty member. It can cover any topic within the area of Social Sciences. It should be interdisciplinary in construction and all elements will be agreed upon between student and course director.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
380
Hours
3
The Administrative Process: Theory & Practice

The purpose of the course is to introduce concepts and principles that are essential to understanding how organizations (public, private and educational) operate. In order to understand administration, one must understand the environment in which administration takes place. organizational studies provide us insight on how effective administration impacts on people, products and society.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
381
Hours
1
Master Mentoring

Students explore what it means to be a mentor, how mentors and proteges form and maintain pro-social interactions and the benefits of these unique interpersonal relationships.

NCLT
382
Hours
3
The History of Family Enterprise

Family owned enterprises have played a long and significant role in both world and U.S. economic history. Many of the products and services used today were first envisioned and created by entrepreneurs who went on to establish and sustain business enterprises that would last for generations. And yet, most family enterprises do not survive more than one or two generations. Research indicates that upwards of one third of all family firms only last one generation, while fewer than that last beyond two generations. But despite the difficulties they have faced, family owned firms have shaped much of our current world.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
383
Hours
3
Leadership In Literature and Film

Great literary works are often remembered for their great characters. Shakespeare’s King Lear, Arthur Miller’s Willy Loman and Conrad’s Kurtz are just three of many that come to mind. And many of the characters in great literary works are required by the author to exhibit leadership in one form or another. In this course, the role of leadership, as portrayed by key characters in several important works of literature, will be studied.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
384
Hours
3
Small Enterprise Development I

To learn the basic fundamentals for starting and operating a small business.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
385
Hours
2
Nonprofit Management

This course examines the processes and functions of nonprofit management.

NCLT
386
Hours
1-3
Special Topics in Leadership

This course may examine various topics in the Leadership Studies. Topics may include: Mentoring, Communication, Human Resource issues, Data Analysis, Strategic Decision Making, Leadership Techniques.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
388
Hours
1-3
Directed Study in Leadership Studies

This course will be designed by the student with the assistance of their Academic Advisor/selected course UA faculty member. It can cover any topic within the area of Leadership Studies. It should be interdisciplinary in construction and all elements will be agreed upon between student and course director.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
490
Hours
1-3
Seminar: Literature, Art & Society

This course will be topic specific to the area of Literature, Art and Society. It will include the use of materials in the chosen area, work done at a distance and one weekend on-campus visit, using interdisciplinary methods of examination, experiential learning and critical thinking and writing.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
491
Hours
1-4
Seminar: Science, Technology & Culture

This course will be topic specific to the area of Science, Technology & Culture. It will include the use of materials in the chosen area, work done at a distance and one weekend on-campus visit, using interdisciplinary methods of examination, experiential learning and critical thinking and writing.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course
NCLT
492
Hours
1-3
Seminar: Community/Leadership Studies

This course will be topic specific to the area of Community or Leadership Studies. It will include the use of materials in the chosen area, work done at a distance and one weekend on-campus visit, using interdisciplinary methods of examination, experiential learning and critical thinking and writing.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
493
Hours
1-3
Seminar: Social Sciences

This course will be topic specific to the area of Social Sciences. It will include the use of materials in the chosen area, work done at a distance and one weekend on-campus visit, using interdisciplinary methods of examination, experiential learning and critical thinking and writing.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
494
Hours
1-3
NCLT Experience

This course will be an interdisciplinary travel course. It will include the use of materials in the chosen area, work done at a distance and one off-campus visit to a site related to the topic of the course, using interdisciplinary methods of examination, experiential learning and critical thinking and writing.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course.
NCLT
498
Hours
1-12
NCLT Senior Project

The Senior Project is a distinctive feature of the LifeTrack Program. It is the culmination of the skills students have learned during their time in the program. The project is designed by the student and includes research, analysis, and synthesis of a particular subject. It is the final step in the completion of the undergraduate degree. The Senior Project may be done for professional enhancement, development of personal interests, academic preparation for graduate school or a combination of these goals. Student projects are matched with a University of Alabama professor.

Prerequisite(s): Students must be enrolled at The University of Alabama within the New College LifeTrack program and receive approval from their assigned academic advisor prior to enrolling this course. Students must have met all Program core requirements and have presented a senior project proposal to their Academic Advisor.