Criminal Justice Courses

CJ
100
SB
Hours
3
Intro Criminal Justice

An overview of the criminal justice system with emphasis on the roles and problems of law enforcement, courts, and correctional components. CJ 100 is a prerequisite for all 300- and 400-level criminal justice courses.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
CJ
220
Hours
3
Law Enforcement

Development of law enforcement; organization and jurisdiction of local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies; and functions of police officers.

CJ
221
Hours
3
Private Security

Organization and management of the security function in industry, business, and government. Exploration of methods to protect personnel, facilities, and other major assets: loss prevention, control, and risk management.

CJ
223
Hours
3
Homeland Security

The course will offer an overview of the United States Department of Homeland Security from its initiation to present day, and the wide range of issues that the department influences, both policy and operational. Additionally, how the United States Department of Homeland Security interacts with state, local, and tribal governments, or law enforcement agencies.

CJ
225
Hours
3
Community Based Corrections

A general overview and introduction to the complex world of Community Based Corrections offering a history and development of punishment and implementation of alternative sanctions.

CJ
230
Hours
3
Social Inequality in the Criminal Justice System

This course examines issues related to the oppression of people on the basis of their class, race, sex, gender, gender expression, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and physical or mental ability within the criminal justice system. It is designed to introduce the student to a range of issues of oppression and social and economic injustice pertinent to the field of criminology and how that affects offenders and others who interact with the criminal justice system.

CJ
240
Hours
3
Juvenile Delinquency

Extent and patterns of delinquency; its development in individuals and gangs; group therapy with delinquents; and juvenile courts, training schools, probation, and aftercare supervision.

CJ
250
Hours
3
Judicial Process

A general overview of U.S. judicial systems, including recent innovations and future trends.

CJ
270
Hours
3
Corrections

A general overview of U.S. corrections, jails and prisons, institutional procedures, recent innovations, and the future of corrections.

CJ
280
Hours
3
Research Methods

Theoretical and specific instruction in both the conduct and application of research methods in criminal justice settings. Includes problem of research and policy dimensions of both direct and applied approaches.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
290
Hours
3
Special Topics in Criminal Justice

Examination of selected problems and issues in Criminal Justice. A maximum of six hours may be use toward the major.

CJ
300
Hours
3
Survey Criminal Theories

Study of traditional and modern explanations of crime and criminality.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
303
W
Hours
3
Race, Ethnicity, and Crime

Study of the role played by racial minorities at each stage of the criminal justice system. Special attention is devoted to theories and measurement of minority crimes and race relations and to the treatment of minorities by law enforcement officers, courts, and corrections.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
Writing
CJ
304
W
Hours
3
Gender and Crime

This course discusses and analyzes the differential experiences of women in the criminal justice system, focusing mostly on women offenders and victims, but also on hegemonic masculinity’s effect on crime. Special attention is given to feminist theoretical explanations of women’s experiences in the criminal justice system. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
Writing
CJ
306
W
Hours
3
History of Crime and Justice

Examination in historical sequence of the perspectives on and methods of crime control, from the traditional to the modern. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
Writing
CJ
330
Hours
3
Organization and Management Concepts in Criminal Justice

Formal organization theory and personnel administration, with emphasis on law enforcement agencies.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
381
Hours
3
Statistics

Statistical methods in criminal justice, including central tendency and dispersion, tests of significance, and measures of association.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100, and MATH 110 or MATH 112 or MATH 115 or MATH 125
CJ
395
Hours
1-12
Internship

An opportunity for students to conduct career exploration and build a record of experience in the field.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100 ***A maximum of 6 hours can be used toward the major.
CJ
408
Hours
3
Gendered Justice and the Death Penalty

This course is designed to introduce the student to gender and justice issues related to women sentenced to death. Using a series of field trips, guest speakers, videos, and case study analyses will explore the historical, social, political, and legal issues of serving time in female prisons. Special emphasis will be placed on female offenders who have been sentenced to death and those sentenced to life without parole. Also, gendered-related issues comparing the incarceration experiences of female death row inmates to the incarceration experiences of male death row inmates will be examined.

CJ
409
Hours
3
Women, Law, and Incarceration

The course examines the various issues that confront women who are incarcerated in state correctional institutions. Additionally, legal issues surrounding women's pathways to crime and their incarceration experiences will be explored.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
420
Hours
3
Seminar In Law Enforcement

Examines the philosophical basis of law enforcement and traces the development of the law enforcement function.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 220
CJ
421
Hours
3
Forensic Science

This course provides student with instruction in the fundamentals of criminal investigation from a forensic science perspective.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
422
Hours
3
Terrorism

An analysis of selected areas of terrorism and counter-terrorism, with an emphasis on parallels between terrorism and crime.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
424
Hours
3
Hate Crimes

Adopting a multidisciplinary perspective, this course is designed to survey and critically evaluate various roots and consequences of, as well as contemporary issues involving, hate crimes. Topics are designed to expose the learner to various domains, facilitating a holistic perspective of hate crimes, as reflected by an integration of social science theory, empirical research, and criminal justice and legal practice.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
425
Hours
3
Domestic Violence

The course examines violence in the context of domestic situations. The types and causes of acts of domestic violence are explored in historical and contemporary context. Various intervention strategies and preventive measures are examined.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
426
Hours
3
White Collar Crime

This course provides a discussion of white-collar crime for the standpoint of criminological theory as well as criminal justice system policies, laws, and procedures.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
430
Hours
3
Drugs, Crime, and Policy

This course examines the current state of drug use, abuse, and trafficking in the United States and throughout the world. It critically examines drug-related topics, such as the history of drug use, patterns associated with drug trafficking organizations and drug-related markets, and both domestic and international drug-related policies.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
435
Hours
3
Global Perspectives on Crime and Justice

This course examines the variety of ways that criminal justice systems are organized and implemented around the world. Many times practitioners fail to recognize other approaches or points of focus that could improve the decision making process in particular and benefit the academic field in general. The social, cultural, and political background of different systems of justice will be introduced and discussed for an in-depth understanding.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
440
Hours
3
Seminar in Juvenile Delinquency

This course examines the problem of juvenile delinquency, exploring the kinds of criminal and delinquent behavior that young people engage in, the various ways academics and professionals have understood and explained such delinquent behavior, and the key institutional responses to the problem. To do this, we will draw on array of sources, including archival materials, historical accounts, case law, quantitative studies, ethnographic accounts, journalistic accounts, sociological, psychological, and criminological theories of delinquent behavior, and more. We will pay particular attention to some of the controversies in the fields concerned with juvenile delinquency, as well as some of the central dilemmas faced by professionals who work with delinquents.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100 CJ 240
CJ
450
Hours
3
Seminar In Judicial Process

Examines the philosophical basis of the American legal system and traces the development of the judicial process.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 250
CJ
460
Hours
3
Criminal Law I

Classification and analysis of selected areas of the substantive law of crimes, including basic principles of criminal law and crimes against the person and property.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
461
Hours
3
Criminal Law II

General principles and theories of criminal procedure, including concepts of due process, arrest, search and seizure, wiretapping, lineups, and other recent developments.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
470
Hours
3
Seminar In Corrections

History, analysis, and evaluation of American correctional institutions, including the sociology of confinement and reform movements within the system.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100 CJ 270
CJ
483
W
Hours
3
Law And Society

Law as an instrument of social control, the functions and limitations of law, and the machinery of law as a part of the larger society. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
Writing
CJ
490
Hours
3
Special Topics in Criminal Justice

Examination of selected problems and issues in criminal justice. A maximum of twelve hours may be used toward the major.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
499
Hours
1-6
Independent Study In CJ

Research under faculty supervision in any area of interest to the student.

Prerequisite(s): A maximum of 3 hours may be used toward the major or minor.

Cyber Criminology Courses

CC
201
Hours
3
Introduction to Cyber Criminology

This course will introduce students to the traditional and contemporary forms of cyber crime, including hacking, insider threat, Internet child pornography use, cyber bullying, and cyber terrorism. Not only will students learn how computers can be either the target or tool in cyber crimes, this course will examine such crimes from both social and behavioral science perspectives, such as the personality traits associated with computer deviance. Finally, this course will provide a general overview of the digital forensic investigation as well as the analysis of digital evidence. No prior knowledge in any of these areas is required.

CC
290
Hours
3
Special Topics in Cyber Crime

Examination of selected issues in cyber security in the United States and throughout the world.

CC
301
Hours
3
Cyber Law and Policy

This course examines cyber criminology from a law and policy perspective, including its impact on Fourth and Fifth Amendment jurisprudence and the changing conceptions of privacy and identity. Topics will focus on the effects of cyber criminology on how criminal laws are conceptualized, enforced, and prosecuted. A central part of the course is a Moot Court component in which students will write a legal brief and argue their side of a cyber-related legal case in front of a panel of lawyers and law students acting as judges.

Prerequisite(s): CC 201
CC
395
Hours
1-9
Internship

An opportunity for students to conduct career exploration and build a record of experience in the field of cyber criminology and digital forensics. To take this course students must obtain permission from the instructor for a specific number of hours and pass a background check.

Prerequisite(s): CC 201 A maximum of 3 hours can be used toward the minor. Instructor must approve the number of hours and the student cannot deviate from those hours without permission of instructor.
CC
401
Hours
3
Law Enforcement in the Digital Age

This course examines the role that technology plays in modern-day policing, and provides students with a detailed overview of how the cyber, digital, and technological worlds have impacted policing historically. In the technology component of the course, students will comprehend computer basics, understanding computer and human networks, and identify the broad range of technologies used by police departments (e.g., less-than-lethal weapons, databases).

Prerequisite(s): CC 201
CC
402
Hours
3
Digital Forensic Investigation

This course is a non-technical overview of the digital crime scene. This course aims to answer the question, “How do law enforcement officers investigate the digital crime scene?” This course will cover how digital forensic investigators identify, preserve, and extract digital evidence using different forensic tools and software. This course will also cover the various legal challenges in digital forensic investigations, including admissibility of evidence in courts, right to privacy, and the right to avoid self-incrimination.

Prerequisite(s): CC 201
CC
490
Hours
3
Special Topics in Cyber Criminology

Examination of selected issues in cyber security in the United States and throughout the world. A maximum of six hours may be used toward the minor.

Prerequisite(s): CC 201

Sociology Courses

SOC
101
SB
Hours
3
Intro To Sociology

Introduction to the scientific study of human social behavior.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
SOC
202
SB
Hours
3
Social Problems

Study of contemporary social problems, including definition, description, and analysis. Emphasis is on social change perspectives and cultural complexity.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
SOC
205
Hours
3
Social Psychology

Not open to students who have earned credit in PY 372. Study of the interrelationships between the individual and the group. Includes perception, cognition, attribution, attitudes, helping behavior, aggression, personal relationships, prejudice, and gender in social life. Also includes aspects of applied social psychology.

SOC
215
Hours
3
Animals and Society

Using symbolic interaction as the main theoretical perspective, this course explores the social relationship between humans and animals and examines the social meanings which shape the roles and status of animals in society and our interactions with them.

SOC
216
Hours
3
Sports and Society

The study of the structural and cultural relationship of sport to society and the importance of sport to the development of self and a community identity. Special emphasis on the structure, function, and meanings of rituals surrounding sports at the University of Alabama.

SOC
301
Hours
3
Social Statistics

Elementary statistical techniques applied to sociological data; tables and graphs, central tendency and dispersion, probability and sampling, tests of significance, and measures of association.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101 and MATH 110 or MATH 112 or MATH 125
SOC
302
Hours
3
Sociological Theory

The course will provide a review of the major systems of thought about society. Special emphasis is given to historical context and philosophical background as they relate to the development of sociological theories. Students will be introduced to view points and idea about how society functions, the role of conflict in society and the forces of social change.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101
SOC
305
Hours
3
Food, Culture, and Society

Food is examined as a social construction - what we do (and don’t) eat, how we eat, and the rituals surrounding food production & consumption. Covering such topics as cultural distinctions and perspectives, federal regulations and subsidies, food-related diseases, and sustainable agriculture.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101
SOC
310
Hours
3
Social Movements and Collective Behavior

This course analyzes social movements: more or less organized attempts by relatively powerless groups to change politics or society. Begins with the building blocks of collective behavior, with a general focus on attempts to push social change in the US and globally.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101
SOC
315
Hours
3
Race And Ethnic Relations

Analysis of American social structure, race and ethnic relations, and demographic and institutional trends; studies of racial and ethnic issues.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101
SOC
352
Hours
3
Social Inequality

Analysis of inequities of wealth, power, and prestige; major theories of racial and cultural minorities; behavioral correlates of stratification; social mobility.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101
SOC
360
W
Hours
3
Sociology of HIV/AIDS

Study of the social dimensions of HIV/AIDS. Discussions cover how HIV/AIDS is socially constructed in terms of gender, sexualities, race/ethnicity and social class. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101
Writing
SOC
390
Hours
3
Selected Topics In Soc

The course may be taken a total of four times, with different topics. Social behavior; science, technology, and society; Latin American life; small-group dynamics; environmental sociology; medical sociology.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101
SOC
404
Hours
3
Health and Society

The health consequences of social deviance and the impact of criminalization for individual and societal wellbeing. Seminar discussions cover the criminalization of mental and physical illness and illnesses arising from criminal behavior and incarceration.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101
SOC
405
Hours
3
Gender & Society

A sociological approach to the study of women & men, focusing on: the social construction of genders in institutions and in everyday life, feminist theories of masculinity, gender inequality, and social change.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101
SOC
406
Hours
3
Organizational Failures and Disasters

This course examines such organizational failures and disasters from a variety of professional fields as way to understand how organizational life influences people’s behavior, thinking, decision-making, and moral judgment. The course covers the nature of organizations, what failures and disasters reveal about the nature of knowledge and the limits of human intervention in the world, and the lessons that can be learned from failures and disasters.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101
SOC
444
W
Hours
3
Environmental Sociology

Sociological analysis of environmental issues including the background of environmental issues, population, planning, limits to growth, food and energy resources, and social impacts of environmental alterations. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101
Writing
SOC
450
W
Hours
3
Sociology Of Law

Study of social origin and consequences of law and legal process; analysis of social factors that determine legal outcomes.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101
Writing
SOC
460
W
Hours
3
Body Politics

Study of how human bodies are politicized in modern society. Discussions cover how the human body is politically constructed according to gender, race/ethnicity, occupation and social class. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101
Writing
SOC
471
W
Hours
3
Medical Sociology

This course addresses topical issues relating to health, medicine, and society. The course will cover four fundamental points: how society shapes individual understandings of what it means to be healthy, how people behave when they are ill, how society produces differential patterns of health and illness, and how medicine is practiced in the United States.

Prerequisite(s): Sociology 101
Writing
SOC
480
Hours
3
Death and Dying

This course examines death and dying from a sociological perspective. In contrast to clinicians (who view dying as a biological/physiological process), or psychologists and/or social workers (who manage grief and loss) we will examine death as a social process that varies by culture, context and historical moment. Our focus will be on the social organization of death itself, with emphasis placed on micro-interactional roles and norms as well as macro-structural organizational and institutional dimensions of death and dying.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101
SOC
490
Hours
1-3
Seminar In Sociology

Examination of selected problems and issues in sociology. A maximum of 12 hours may be used toward the minor.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101
SOC
499
Hours
1-6
Ind Study in Sociology

1-6 hour independent study course allowing students to conduct sociological research under faculty supervision.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 101