Philosophy Courses

PHL
100
HU
Hours
3
Intro To Philosophy

Survey of the main topics of philosophy, which may include God, souls, free will, the nature of right and wrong, just government, truth, and knowledge. Offered in the fall and spring semesters.

Humanities
PHL
104
HU
Hours
3
Critical Thinking

Introduction to the concepts and methods used to identify, construct, and assess arguments as they appear in editorials, articles, ordinary speech, etc.

Humanities
PHL
106
HU, UH
Hours
3
Honors Introduction to Deductive Logic

In this course, you will explore and analyze influential arguments from the history of philosophy, including arguments concerning questions of values, ethics, and aesthetics. You will learn to apply tools and methods of formal deductive logic to those arguments, and to appreciate the breadth of topics for which such analysis is appropriate. You will use analytical tools such as the construction of proofs and countermodels to evaluate philosophical arguments as well as arguments concerning other topics. The arguments analyzed in this course include a number of influential arguments from the history of philosophy. Among them are Aquinas' arguments for the existence of God, Parmenidean arguments for the impossibility of change, Berkeley's Master Argument for idealism, Descartes' cogito argument, arguments for skepticism, Mill's "proof" of Utilitarianism, Kant's argument for the Categorical Imperative, the Experience Machine objection to Utilitarianism, Singer's argument for animal rights, the Stoic argument that death is not to be feared, and more.

Prerequisite(s): C- or better in MATH 100 OR MATH 110 OR MATH 112 OR MATH 113 OR MATH 115 OR MATH 121 OR MATH 125 OR UA Math Placement Test Score of 190 OR ACT Math Subscore of 28 OR SAT Math Subscore of 690 or Admissions to UA Honors
Humanities, University Honors
PHL
191
HU, UH
Hours
3
Honors Introduction to Philosophy

Survey of the main topics of philosophy, which may include God, souls, free will, the nature of right and wrong, just government, truth, and knowledge. Restricted to UA Honors students.

Humanities, University Honors
PHL
195
HU
Hours
3
Introduction to Deductive Logic

In this course, you will explore and analyze influential arguments from the history of philosophy, including arguments concerning questions of values, ethics, and aesthetics. You will learn to apply tools and methods of formal deductive logic to those arguments, and to appreciate the breadth of topics for which such analysis is appropriate. You will use analytical tools such as the construction of proofs and countermodels to evaluate philosophical arguments as well as arguments concerning other topics.The arguments analyzed in this course include a number of influential arguments from the history of philosophy. Among them are Aquinas' arguments for the existence of God, Parmenidean arguments for the impossibility of change, Berkeley's Master Argument for idealism, Descartes' cogito argument, arguments for skepticism, Mill's "proof" of Utilitarianism, Kant's argument for the Categorical Imperative, the Experience Machine objection to Utilitarianism, Singer's argument for animal rights, the Stoic argument that death is not to be feared, and more.

Prerequisite(s): C- or better in MATH 100 or MATH 110 or MATH 112 or MATH 113 or MATH 115 or MATH 121 or MATH 125
Humanities
PHL
209
Hours
1-3
Research in Philosophy

This course is an opportunity to do 200-level self-directed study and writing on an approved topic early in a student’s study of philosophy.

PHL
211
HU
Hours
3
Ancient Philosophy

This course will focus on the major themes of ancient Greek philosophy, from the earliest pre-Socratic philosophers, through Plato and Aristotle, to the later Epicureans, Stoics, and Skeptics. We will proceed chronologically and pay special attention to the systematic connections between metaphysics, epistemology, and ethics in each school of thought, as well as the development of later views in light of criticisms of earlier ones. The aim of this course is to provide students a reasonably comprehensive background in the main areas of Western analytic philosophy through an examination of some of the earliest systematic philosophies.

Humanities
PHL
212
HU
Hours
3
Early Modern Philosophy

This course will look at the main figures and intellectual developments of the early Modern period of philosophy. We will proceed chronologically, starting with Descartes's seminal Meditations on First Philosophy and tracing two very different branches of influence from there to what are often called the Rationalist and Empiricist schools. Other figures of note will be Locke, Leibniz, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.

Humanities
PHL
215
HU
Hours
3
American Philosophy

Relatively few courses are offered on American philosophy, in spite of the fact that the United States has become a worldwide center of philosophy, and is the home of Pragmatism, one of the three major philosophical approaches. This course will be an introduction to American philosophy from the theologian Jonathan Edwards and the political philosophers who had a hand in the founding of America, to classic pragmatists such as Peirce, James and Dewey, and leading 20th century thinkers, such as Quine, Kuhn, Rorty, Putnam and others.

Humanities
PHL
221
HU, UH
Hours
3
Honors Introduction to Ethics

This course is designed to give the students a broad introduction to the field of philosophical ethics. The primary aim is to acquaint students with the basic subject matter of ethics as it is studied within philosophy, a few central authorities and positions, and a feel for how philosophers engage with contemporary ethical issues in light of some of the historical influences on the discipline. We will read a variety of texts ranging from historical works on ethics generally to contemporary works focusing on specific moral issues. The hope is that students will develop an understanding and appreciation of how different ethical theories apply to particular cases, and how they might begin to engage in genuine ethical debates. Restricted to UA Honors students.

Humanities, University Honors
PHL
223
HU
Hours
3
Medical Ethics

This class provides an introduction to the philosophical study of applied ethics by way of a discussion of topics related to the practice of medical and biological science. Topics of discussion will include abortion, stem cell research, cloning, the allocation of scarce or limited resources, animal experimentation, and patient autonomy, among others. Along the way, other important topics in moral philosophy will be discussed.

Humanities
PHL
230
HU
Hours
3
Political Philosophy

This course serves as an introduction to central debates in political philosophy. The major questions we explore are the following: How can the coercive authority the government exercises over its citizens be justified? What does justice require in our society today? What role do democracy, freedom, rights and equality play in our understanding of a just society? Through the study of both historical and contemporary texts, we investigate these topics. We also consider how these issues bear upon debates in the contemporary American context concerning the following: restrictions on free speech, participation in the democratic process, the war on drugs, homelessness, education and socioeconomic inequality.

Humanities
PHL
231
Hours
1
Social Justice in Practice

What does justice require in our society today? With a focus on contemporary social and political issues, we seek to answer this question by looking at different dimensions of justice. We consider how the ideals of democracy, freedom, rights, and equality ought to inform our understanding of a just society. In particular, we focus on how these ideals translate into practice with respect to philosophical debates about immigration, poverty, political participation, and socioeconomic inequality.,In addition to learning about these issues in the class-room, students will develop a deeper understanding of social justice through engagement with a community project. The service-learning component of the course involves regular participation in a community program working with disadvantaged and/or marginalized populations.

Prerequisite(s): None. Corequisite: PHL 230.
PHL
234
HU
Hours
3
Social Philosophy

How should we live together? In this course, we seek to answer this question through moral assessment of the institutional rules and cultural norms that shape our interaction with others and the world around us. We specifically consider issues in the following two categories: I. Markets & consumption. In the modern-day economy, we must grapple with important issues concerning the responsibilities of individual consumers and corporations, what goods may be legitimately bought and sold in a free market, and how economic transactions between nations should be structured to count as fair. II. Violence. One of the features thought to make the state distinctive is that it has a monopoly over the legitimate use of force. Given this power, we will examine the legitimate use of violence by the government. Is the death penalty justified? Is the use of torture permissible under any circumstances? How should it deal with terrorists as opposed to traditional combatants in war?.

Humanities
PHL
240
HU
Hours
3
Philosophy and the Law

This class is an introduction to and survey of philosophical issues in the law, focusing on issues in general jurisprudence such as the nature of law and its relation to morality, the grounds of the legitimacy of legal authority, and the sources of legal normativity and validity. There may also be some discussion of issues in specific jurisprudence such as the value of written constitutions and their interpretations, the nature of extent of legal responsibility, and questions about the authority of non-elected judges. At least one prior course in philosophy is strongly recommended.

Humanities
PHL
241
HU
Hours
3
Philosophical Issues in Criminal Law

This is a course exploring major issues in the philosophy of criminal law. Topics might include the appropriate justifications for punishment, what kinds of acts are appropriately criminalized, philosophical issues relating to elements of a crime (such as whether an act is required), the problem of attempts and moral luck, affirmative defenses such as justifications and excuses, the use of vague terminology in the elements of a crime and the need for judges or juries to make moral judgments, and relations to the wider morality of law.

Humanities
PHL
242
HU
Hours
3
Philosophical Issues in Civil Law

This is a course exploring major issues in the philosophy of civil law. Civil law is the area of law in which private parties sue each other, generally in order to get compensation for a perceived wrong done by the other party. It includes areas such as tort law (accidents, malpractice, etc.) and contract law. Possible topics to be covered are whether tort law is based on rectification for injustices or economic considerations, the relation of contract law to philosophical issues in promising, and philosophical issues relating to the use of a public process to redress private disputes.

Humanities
PHL
243
HU
Hours
3
Philosophical Issues in Constitutional Law

This is a course exploring major issues in the philosophy of constitutional law. Generally constitutional law is concerned with what powers and responsibilities governments have as well as what the limits on those powers might be, including civil rights. In doing so, constitutions guide official determinations of what counts as legally valid within the relevant jurisdiction. Topics might include debates over the proper way to interpret constitutions, whether constitutions must (or should) be written documents, whether they are necessary (or desirable) in a democracy, the relation between principles of legality set forth in constitutions and moral principles (especially the relation between legal rights and moral rights), and the advisability of official bodies tasked with interpreting and applying the constitution such as the Supreme Court.

Humanities
PHL
256
HU
Hours
3
Philosophy of Sport

This course will examine some of the major themes in the burgeoning field of philosophy of sport, paying special attention to a number of important ethical issues. We will look at the nature of sports (and games more generally), sportsmanship and fairness, the role of officials, gender equity, racism, and issues surrounding the use of performance-enhancing drugs. This course is reading intensive. Prior exposure to philosophy is welcome but not required.

Humanities
PHL
260
HU
Hours
3
Mind and Nature

This course is framed around two questions. First, what is the place of the mind in nature? Second, what is the place of nature in the mind? The first question is a form of mind/problem, which concerns the relationship between mental phenomena such as consciousness and the physical world. The second question is a part of the epistemology, the philosophy of knowledge, and concerns the nature and scope of human knowledge.

Humanities
PHL
264
HU
Hours
3
Introduction to Metaphysics

Topics may include proofs for the existence of God, the nature of reality, free will and determinism, personal identity, and the nature of time.

Humanities
PHL
281
HU
Hours
3
Introduction to Philosophy of Religion

This course is an introduction of such topics in religion as concepts of God and religion, ritual, atheism, the problem of evil, the nature of religious language, traditional proofs of God, the concept of faith, mysticism, the concept of miracle, and the relation between theism and morality.

Humanities
PHL
286
Hours
3
Introduction to Philosophy of Science

Basic issues in philosophy of science, including the following: What distinguishes science from pseudo-science? Is there a scientific method? If so, what is that method? What constitutes a scientific explanation? How are theory and observation related? How do hypotheses get confirmed? And how do values function in science?.

PHL
290
Hours
1-3
Special Topics in Philosophy

This course offers introductory-level study of a special philosophical topic that is not a part of the Department's regular course offerings.

PHL
291
FA
Hours
3
Aesthetics

In this course, we will be introduced to some of the most fundamental concerns about art: What is distinctive, if anything, about the experience of artworks? Why do we identify anything as a work of art? How do we, or should we interpret an artwork? On what grounds can we criticize an artwork?.

Fine Arts
PHL
292
HU
Hours
3
Introduction to Ethics

Introduction to competing views of how one ought to live, designed to promote the development of a reasoned view of one’s own. May include such topics as ethical relativism, the nature of justice and of rights, and the relationship of law and morality.

Humanities
PHL
305
Hours
3
Symbolic Logic

This course aims to improve students’ understanding of the basic concepts of formal logic, particularly the truth-functional and predicate calculi. Students learn convenient methods of formal reasoning, and use them to study some of the basic notions of metalogic. B- or better in PHL 195 or C or better in PHL 106, or Instructor's permission is required.

Prerequisite(s): B- or better in PHL 195 or C or better in PHL 106
PHL
309
Hours
3
Teaching Practicum

This course number is for students who are receiving course credit for working as TAs for philosophy classes. Ordinarily, students working as TAs for classes are responsible for taking roll, proctoring and grading tests, and, most importantly, providing tutorial assistance to the students. Specific duties might vary depending on the needs of the class.

PHL
312
W
Hours
3
Contemporary Philosophy

Philosophy in the 20th century. Topics may include linguistic analysis, logical atomism, logical positivism, ordinary language philosophy, existentialism, and phenomenology. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of at least 2 PHL courses
Writing
PHL
332
W
Hours
3
Theories of Justice

Advanced study of prominent theories of prominent historical and contemporary theories of justice (for example, those of Plato, Aristotle, Rawls, or Nozick) and the implication of those theories for political problems such as the distribution of health care, affirmative action, or public goods. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): You are required to have taken at least two philosophy classes prior to this one, including one at the 200-level or above; or instructor's permission.
Writing
PHL
333
W
Hours
3
Global Justice

In an increasingly globalized world, questions of global justice have risen to prominence in contemporary political philosophy. In this course we examine the following issues. Do the demands of justice transcend state borders? Do we have reason to think that different demands of justice apply at the global level than at the state level? How do increased levels of global interdependence bear upon what we owe to foreigners versus to our fellow citizens? Does the global order harm the world’s poor? Are there any universal human rights? If so, how are they justified and who is responsible for upholding them? Drawing on competing contemporary philosophical accounts of justice, we consider different ways of addressing concrete practical issues such as global poverty and inequality, humanitarian intervention, and immigration. You are required to have taken at least two philosophy classes prior to this one, including one at the 200-level or above. If you do not meet this requirement, you must obtain special permission from the instructor. This 3-credit hour course carries a W designation. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course. Prerequisite(s): two PHL classes or instructor's permission.

Prerequisite(s): Two PHL classes or instructor's permission.
Writing
PHL
341
W
Hours
3
Law and Morality

This class explores the moral status of legality and the legal status of morality, the status of unjust laws, and the role of moral judgments of lawmakers. Is a good law one that does good? What is the relation between morality and legal validity? Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course. Prereq: at least one prior philosophy class with a B or better.

Prerequisite(s): One prior PHL class with a B or better
Writing
PHL
343
W
Hours
3
Philosophical Issues in International Law

This course explores philosophical issues that arise with respect to the international law. Some of these are conceptual. For instance, what qualifies as ‘international law’ and in virtue of what characteristics? International laws, norms, and rule-mediated practices are different in character from the laws that govern our lives within the state. Who makes international laws, and who enforces them? A host of normative issues arise with respect to international law too. What if anything gives international legal bodies like the United Nations, the International Criminal Court, and the Appellate Body of the World Trade Organization rightful authority over those who are taken to be bound by their rules? In cases of conflict, do the laws of states trump international laws or vice-versa? We will consider some of the ethical issues surrounding international laws, treaties, and conventions concerning some of the following issues: human rights; war, humanitarian intervention and the use of violence more broadly; trade and economic globalization; the environment and the use of natural resources; immigration and refugees; and intellectual property. You are required to have taken at least two philosophy classes prior to this one, including one at the 200-level or above. If you do not meet this requirement, you must obtain special permission from the instructor. This 3-credit hour course carries a W designation. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.Tentative course requirements: two papers, a final exam, and homework.

Prerequisite(s): You are required to have taken at least two philosophy classes prior to this one, including one at the 200-level or above; or instructor's permission.
Writing
PHL
349
Hours
3
Legal Reasoning

This class gives you the reasoning skills you need to enter law school and those you need while in law school and beyond. While learning analytical and logical reasoning skills as well as legal research and argument-writing skills, the course covers topics such as problems with rule following and vagueness, the nature and authority of precedent, statutory interpretation, judicial decisions and burdens of proof.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of one PHL class with at least a B
PHL
360
W
Hours
3
Philosophy of Mind

What is the relationship between the mental and the physical? That is the central question in the philosophy of mind, and we will approach it from different angles. We will focus largely on consciousness and its place in nature. Most readings will be from the contemporary literature but some will be historical. This course carries a W designation, and so writing proficiency within the discipline of philosophy is required for a passing grade in this course. Two philosophy courses or instructor’s permission. PHL 260 Mind and Nature is recommended but not required.

Prerequisite(s): Must have taken at least two philosophy courses prior to this course.
Writing
PHL
362
W
Hours
3
Mind, Language, and Reality

This course concerns the nature of meaning and its connection to metaphysics and epistemology. We will study classic works by Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, Saul Kripke, and others. We will also study more recent work in philosophical semantics and its application to arguments in the philosophy of mind. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course. Must have taken Introduction to Deductive Logic (PHL 195 or PHL 106) and one other philosophy course, or have instructor’s permission.

Prerequisite(s): PHL 195 OR PHL 106 and one other PHL course
Writing
PHL
364
W
Hours
3
Philosophy of Cognitive Science

This course addresses some core questions in the philosophy of cognitive science. Topics covered are likely to include: the computational theory of mind, the role of mental representations in cognition, the extended mind hypothesis, and mechanisms of mental state attribution. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. Need to have taken at least two previous philosophy courses.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of at least 2 PHL courses.
Writing
PHL
366
W
Hours
3
Metaphysics

Advanced study of such traditional metaphysical problems as personal identity, the mind-body problem, action theory, free will, universals, the nature of space and time, creation, causation, and purpose. Must have taken at least two philosophy courses prior to this course. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of at least 2 PHL courses.
Writing
PHL
370
W
Hours
3
Epistemology

This course surveys issues in the philosophical study of knowledge. Typical questions addressed include: What is the nature of knowledge? What are the limits of what we can know? When is a belief justified? What can science tell us about the nature of knowledge or rational thought? Must have taken Introduction to Deductive Logic (PHL 195 or PHL 106) and one other philosophy course, or have instructor’s permission. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): PHL 195 or PHL 106 and one other philosophy course, or have instructor’s permission.
Writing
PHL
381
W
Hours
3
Philosophy of Religion

Advanced study of such topics in religion as concepts of God and religion, ritual, atheism, the problem of evil, the nature of religious language, traditional proofs of God, the concept of faith, mysticism, the concept of miracle, and the relation between theism and morality. At least two previous philosophy courses required. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of at least 2 PHL courses.
Writing
PHL
386
Hours
3
Philosophy of Science

This course will cover some of the main topics in philosophy of science: the demarcation of science and pseudoscience, scientific methods, the nature of evidence, scientific progress, and values and science.

Prerequisite(s): None.
PHL
387
W
Hours
3
Philosophy and Evolution

The “Darwinian Revolution” – the acceptance and development of evolutionary theory - is one of the most significant intellectual events in recent human history. It is significant partly because it has changed the way we understand the world, and the processes that operate within it. But it is also significant for the philosophical issues it raises about scientific method, conceptions of human nature, biodiversity, knowledge, ethics and the arts. This course will examine these philosophical issues raised by the Darwinian revolution. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
PHL
390
Hours
1-3
Special Topics in Philosophy

This course offers advanced study of a special philosophical topic or movement that is not a part of the Department's regular course offerings.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of at least two PHL courses.
PHL
391
Hours
3
History of Philosophy

Advanced study of a particular philosopher or philosophical movement or problem in the history of philosophy. Must have taken at least two previous philosophy courses or permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of at least 2 PHL courses.
PHL
392
W
Hours
3
Special Topics in Philosophy (Writing Intensive)

With an emphasis on philosophical writing, this seminar offers advanced study of a special philosophical topic that is not a part of the Department's regular course offerings. Prerequisite: successful completion of at least two PHL courses. PHL 392 may be repeated up to 12 hours. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of two PHL courses.
Writing
PHL
393
W
Hours
3
Hist of PHL: Sp Top (Writing)

Advanced study of a particular philosopher or philosophical movement or problem in the history of philosophy. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course. Must have taken at least two previous philosophy courses or permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): Must have taken at least two previous philosophy courses or permission of instructor.
Writing
PHL
409
Hours
1-3
Research in Philosophy

This course is an opportunity to do self-directed study and writing in an approved topic.

PHL
420
Hours
3
Special Studies in Ethics

Advanced study of current topics in ethics, which could include study of a particular moral theory or moral problem. PHL 420 may be repeated up to 6 hours.

Prerequisite(s): At least two previous PHL courses, including PHL 292 or PHL 221.
PHL
423
W
Hours
3
Advanced Seminar in Medical Ethics

This course provides an in-depth examination of some of the central ethical issues encountered by physicians and other medical professionals. Students will acquire breadth in the field of medical ethics as well as engage in an in-depth examination of specific issues. Possible topics include: The physician-patient relationship, the role of physicians and other medical professionals, end-of-life decision-making (advance directives, do not resuscitate orders, palliative care, the definition of death), beginning of life decision-making (genetic counseling and prenatal screening), and the ethics of clinical research, and bias and unequal treatment in healthcare practice. The course is specifically aimed at students who are considering a career in healthcare but will be of interest to anyone who has a special interest in biomedical ethics. This course carries a W designation. Writing proficiency within philosophy is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): None, although previous coursework in ethics will be helpful.
Writing
PHL
428
W
Hours
3
Metaethics

In this seminar we will explore issues in contemporary metaethics. Metaethics is concerned with the nature of moral properties, what moral claims mean, and how moral knowledge can be justified. In our everyday lives, we make a number of moral judgments—for instance, that we should not lie to a friend or that it is wrong to steal. Can these moral judgments be factually true, or are they just a matter of opinion? How do we come to know what is right or wrong? These are some of the key questions that will be explored in this course. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): You are required to have taken at least two philosophy classes prior to this one, including one at the 200-level or above; or instructor's permission.
Writing
PHL
440
W
Hours
3
Seminar on Law

This is a course covering a specialized advanced topic in specific jurisprudence. Specific jurisprudence deals with issues relevant to one area of law or legal system. Example topics are issues in criminal punishment, debates over the proper way to interpret the U.S. Constitution, and the dilemmas of privacy law. The Professor will determine the specific topic each semester the course is offered. It requires writing proficiency in philosophy in order to pass and requires students to draft sustained philosophical arguments.

Prerequisite(s): B or better in a 200-level course from the jurisprudence list* or instructor's approval, or an A- or better in any PHL class with a writing designation. *PHL 292 or PHL 221 or PHL 230 or PHL 234 or PHL 240 or PHL 241 or PHL 242 or PHL 243 or PHL 256 Note from professor: a "B-" in the above courses is not sufficient
Writing
PHL
448
W
Hours
3
Philosophy of Law

This is a course covering a specialized advanced topic in general jurisprudence. General jurisprudence deals with issues relevant to law as a whole. Example topics are issues in legal authority, interpretation and rule following, and legal validity. The Professor will determine the specific topic each semester the course is offered. It requires writing proficiency in philosophy in order to pass and requires students to draft sustained philosophical arguments.

Prerequisite(s): B or better in a 200-level course from the jurisprudence list* or instructor's approval, or an A- or better in any PHL class with a writing designation. *PHL 292 or PHL 221 or PHL 230 or PHL 234 or PHL 240 or PHL 241 or PHL 242 or PHL 243 or PHL 256 Note from professor: a "B-" in the above courses is not sufficient
Writing
PHL
455
Hours
3
Philosophy through Documentary

This course aims to deepen philosophical understanding primarily through watching and discussing documentary films, supplemented with philosophical readings. The topics covered will vary with the films chosen by the instructor.

PHL
462
W
Hours
3
Neural Basis of Consciousness

Consciousness is one of the last great mysteries. Recent years have seen the use of neuroscientific methods to try to understand consciousness, in hopes that this approach succeeds where others failed. This course surveys and analyzes current neuroscientific and philosophical approaches to studying consciousness, the goal being to integrate the two as much as possible. Topics covered include: the relationship between visual consciousness and bodily action; whether higher-order thought is necessary for consciousness; the use of brain lesions in consciousness research; the relationship between attention and consciousness. Because this course carries a W designation, writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): None
Writing
PHL
488
W
Hours
3
Philosophy of Mental Health

In this course we will look at a variety of philosophical questions concerning mental health, mental illness, and how we should think about mental health in the context of medical practice more generally. Topics covered may include: Ontology and classification: What makes an illness mental as opposed to physical? When does a mental problem qualify as pathological (and so, get classified as an “illness”) and what are the implications of classifying something as an illness with respect to how we think about and treat it? Research on mental illness: What special challenges arise in studying mental illness? Agency, autonomy, and identity: When is a mental illness autonomy subverting in the sense of undermining a person’s ability to make informed, voluntary decisions? Moral responsibility: When are people with mental illnesses responsible for symptomatic behavior? Stigma and mental illness: In what ways are mental illnesses stigmatized and why are mental illnesses stigmatized more than physical illnesses?.

Prerequisite(s): None
Writing
PHL
489
W
Hours
3
Philosophy of Medicine

It is difficult to overstate the significance of medicine, in that it affects each of us from birth through death; or the complexity of medicine, in that it involves scientific, conceptual, economic, ethical and philosophical issues. We will here look at three of these issues from a philosophical standpoint: 1) the ways that we conceptualize health and disease; 2) the relation between medicine and science, and the patterns of reasoning associated with medical thinking; 3) the challenge posed by evolution to how we think about medicine, health and disease. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
PHL
490
Hours
1-3
Special Topics in Philosophy

This course offers advanced study of a philosophical topic or movement that is not a part of the Department's regular course offerings. At least two previous philosophy courses or permission from instructor required.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of at least 2 PHL courses.
PHL
492
W
Hours
3
Special Topics in Philosophy (Writing Intensive)

With an emphasis on philosophical writing, this advanced seminar offers study of a special philosophical topic that is not a part of the Department's regular course offerings. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course. Prerequisite: successful completion of at least two PHL courses. PHL 492 may be repeated up to 12 hours.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of at least 2 PHL courses.
Writing