Clothing, Textiles and Interior Design

The area of study in clothing, textiles and interior design provides preparation for careers in higher education, business and industry and government services, and for admission to doctoral programs in clothing, textiles and interior design and related fields. The area of study is designed to stimulate independent thought and develop skills in problem solving, creativity and research methods. Individualized programs of study are planned to develop professional competence in the student's area of interest. Students applying for admission to the area of study in clothing, textiles and interior design refer to the requirements for admission detailed in an earlier section of this catalog. All applicants must submit test scores from either the Graduate Record Examination or the Miller Analogies Test in support of the application. All applicants in interior design must also submit portfolios for review. A grade of B or higher must be earned in all courses taken in the Department of Clothing, Textiles and Interior Design for application toward degree requirements.

Consumer Sciences

The consumer sciences area of study offers preparation for careers in government, consumer protection, financial services and extension and for further study leading to the doctoral degree. Each student's curriculum is determined individually, based on career goals and research interests. Students applying for admission to the area of study in consumer sciences refer to the requirements for admission detailed in an earlier section of this catalog. Applicants who do not have an undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0 or a GPA of at least 3.0 in the last 60 hours of undergraduate coursework will be required to submit an acceptable test score on either the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or Millers Analogies Test (MAT).

Core courses required of all students include:

Hours
CSM 500Personal Insurance Plan & Mgt3
CSM 504Personal Investment Plan & Mgt3
CSM 510Pers Retire Plan Empl Benefits3
CSM 520Personal Estate Planning3
CSM 554Personal Income Tax Mgt Plang3
CSM 559Tech of Counsl in Cons Science3
CSM 560Finan Plan Case Study Capstone3
Electives
Select three of the following:9
Consumer Conflict Mediation, Management & Negotiation in the Workplace
Consumer Quality Mgt Systems
Entrepreneurship In Hes
Practicum
Principled Negotiation
Total Hours30

For those students planning to write a thesis, CSM 599 Thesis Research offers the opportunity to work with faculty. Current research topics in the field include family and personal expenditure patterns; effects of credit use; time use; and individual and family resource management. Students who wish to specialize in family financial planning and counseling should have completed the following courses or equivalents at the undergraduate level:

Hours
EC 110Principles of Microeconomics3
EC 111Principles of Macroeconomics3
ST 260Statistical Data Analysis3
CSM 204Intro Personl Finan Plan3

The program in Consumer Sciences participates in the University Scholars Program. Qualified students begin graduate study in the senior year. This program leads to the completion of requirements for both the bachelor's and master's degrees. A student who wishes to exercise this option will normally apply to Phase I of the program in the sophomore year; however, students may apply directly to Phase II of the program at the end of the junior year. Procedures are detailed in the Admission Criteria section of this catalog.

See the Admission Criteria section of this catalog for more information.

General Studies in Human Environmental Sciences

The area of study in general human environmental sciences is designed to permit students to pursue work in more than one area of human environmental sciences and/or to strengthen professional competence by selecting courses that support or complement an area of human environmental sciences, including: restaurant, hotel, and meetings management, interactive technology, sports management, consumer quality management, rural community health, the certificate in consumer conflict management, negotiation, and mediation; and the certificate in environmental health and safety management. Students interested in this area of study may complete in-depth studies in interactive technology, quality management, sport management, conflict management, environmental health and safety or restaurant and hospitality management. Students should refer to the respective website for each area of study for specific details. Students may work under Plan I or Plan II. Applicants must clearly state the area of study on the Graduate School Application.

Students applying for admission to the area of study in general studies refer to the requirements for admission detailed in an earlier section of this catalog. A student with a cumulative grade point average of 3.0, a GPA of 3.0 in the last 60 hours of coursework, or a GPA of 3.0 in a master's degree program is not required to submit standardized test scores. However, this does not guarantee admission.

Environmental Health & Safety Management

The College of Human Environmental Sciences (HES) offers a curriculum in EH&S Management that allows students to pursue coursework for advancing their current career or preparing them to enter professional practice. Students may pursue a graduate certificate and/or master’s degree in human environmental sciences with a specialization in EH&S Management. The graduate certificate consists of 15-hours of coursework while the master’s degree requires an additional 15-hours.

The graduate certificate in EH&S Management consists of five courses that will empower students with the knowledge and skills required for successfully managing occupational health and safety within organizations. The course credit earned through the Graduate Certificate may also be applied towards earning the Master of Science degree with a specialization in EH&S Management. The completion of the master’s degree will require five additional courses which provide students the opportunity to advance their education to a higher level.

Students who are admitted for the Graduate Certificate as a non-degree seeking student must re-apply to the Graduate School in order to change their status into a degree-seeking student if they decide to pursue the master’s degree at a later time. 

Human Development & Family Studies

The area of study in human development and family studies provides students with the theoretical foundation and research skills necessary to pursue doctoral work and for advanced employment in a wide variety of occupations serving children, adults and families. Students can choose to concentrate in human development and family studies (HDFS) research, marriage and family therapy (MFT) or parent and family life education (PAFLE). HDFS research opportunities include working with faculty members in the following areas: language and cognitive development in young children; personality and social development of children and adolescents; parent-child relationships; risk factors associated with child development outcomes; assessment of early intervention programs; social support and well-being of adults; family strengths; marital interaction; and maternal depression and infant development. Completion of the MFT curriculum enables students to take the licensure examination leading to Clinical Membership in the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy. Research and clinical opportunities are provided in the College's child development laboratories and Capstone Family Therapy Clinic. Completion of the PAFLE curriculum qualifies students to apply for provisional certification as a Family Life Educator through the National Council on Family Relations. The parent and family life education curriculum also culminates in an internship and comprehensive examination.

Students applying for admission to the area of study in human development and family studies should refer to the requirements for admission detailed in an earlier section of this catalog and should visit the Human Development and Family Studies website. All applicants must submit test scores from either the Graduate Record Examination or the Miller Analogies Test in support of the application. To graduate from master's programs in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies, students must maintain a "B" average in the courses related to the area of study.

Human Nutrition

The area of study in human nutrition prepares students to pursue doctoral study and to practice dietetics at an advanced level. The program develops research skills, stimulates independent thought and provides detailed up-to-date knowledge of the subject matter. Students studying human nutrition must complete:

Hours
HES 509Research Methods3
CHS 525Biostatistics3
NHM 561Advanced Vitamins and Minerals Metabolism3
NHM 562Metabolism of Energy Nutrients3
NHM 555 or Maternal and Infant Nutrition3
NHM 567 Nutr Support Criticl Ill

Students must take at least 18 hours of NHM designated courses (including the 9 hours of required NHM core classes). Students must earn a B or higher in each class taken within the nutrition department and all required courses outside the department. Students who do not earn a B on the first attempt of any required course will be allowed to repeat the course for a higher grade once. NHM electives can only be taken once.

The thesis for the human nutrition area of study should focus on current nutritional concerns in which the student has a special interest. Students also have opportunities to participate in research with faculty members. Examples of faculty research include food insecurity, childhood obesity, body composition changes among older adults, clinical nutrition and antioxidant capacity of foods and risk for chronic disease.
 
Students who choose the non-thesis option (Plan II) must complete one of the following culminating experiences: non-thesis research NHM 598 Non-Thesis Research, or a comprehensive examination.

The program in human nutrition participates in the University Scholars Program. Qualified students begin graduate study in the senior year. This program leads to the completion of requirements for both the bachelor's and master's degrees. Procedures are detailed in the Admission Criteria section of this catalog. Students who apply to the University Scholar Program in Human Nutrition must have an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher.

Students applying for admission to the area of study in human nutrition should refer to the requirements for admission detailed in an earlier section of this catalog. A student with a cumulative grade point average of 3.0, a GPA of 3.0 in the last 60 hours of coursework, or a GPA of 3.0 in a master's degree program is not required to submit standardized test scores.  Students with an undergraduate GPA of 3.4 or below may enhance their application and chances of acceptance into the program by taking the GRE.  All students applying for admission to the degree program should have completed undergraduate course work with a B or better grade in the following subject areas: 

Hours
NHM 101Intro Human Nutrition3
NHM 201Nutrition In Life Cycle3
NHM 361Nutritional Biochemistry3
NHM 362Nutrition At Cell Level3
NHM 363Applied Nutrition3
NHM 365Med Nutr Therapy I3
NHM 372Intro Food Service Mgt3
NHM 373Purchsg Design Risk Mgt Food S3
NHM 374Quant Food Prod & Servc3
inorganic and organic chemistry
microbiology
two semesters of anatomy and physiology
Total Hours27
Hours
CSM 500Personal Insurance Plan & Mgt3
CSM 504Personal Investment Plan & Mgt3
CSM 510Pers Retire Plan Empl Benefits3
CSM 520Personal Estate Planning3
CSM 554Personal Income Tax Mgt Plang3
CSM 559Tech of Counsl in Cons Science3
CSM 560Finan Plan Case Study Capstone3
Electives
Select three of the following:9
Consumer Conflict Mediation, Management & Negotiation in the Workplace
Consumer Quality Mgt Systems
Entrepreneurship In Hes
Practicum
Principled Negotiation
Total Hours30

Six semester hours of eligible credit from one master's degree at The University of Alabama may be applied to the requirements for a second master's degree, but only if the department of the second master’s agrees to the courses in the plan of study. Any hours from the previous master’s degree must have been earned during the six years (18 fall, spring, and summer semesters) immediately preceding the date on which the second degree is to be awarded. ***Please note that if a student double counts six hours between two master’s degrees, no hours may double count toward any additional master’s degrees.