College of Community Health Sciences

The College of Community Health Sciences (CCHS) is committed to the education of students in the health sciences. CCHS is the site of the Tuscaloosa Regional Campus of the University of Alabama School of Medicine and provides clinical training to third and fourth year medical students. The College also operates a three-year family medicine residency program.
 
CCHS welcomes students from disciplines other than medicine. A variety of graduate-level courses are offered, as are research opportunities for students in nursing, health care management, nutrition, psychology, education, social work and other disciplines.

The courses listed below are open to qualified graduate students. Medical school and family practice residency curricula are published separately from this catalog.

CHS
500
Hours
3
Rural Envir/Occup Health

The goal of the course is to help the student recognize environmental and occupational health hazards in the rural setting, the effects of exposure to these hazards, and preventive measures that should be taken to avoid them.

CHS
510
Hours
3
Health Economics

A course designed for graduate students interested in understanding the importance of health economics on public policy. Topics include the supply and demand of health care, health insurance, consequences of information asymmetry, health technology assessment, comparison of national health care systems, and behavioral economics.

CHS
511
Hours
3
Introduction to Health Care Quality

This course provides healthcare practitioners and others with an introduction to the knowledge and skills needed to lead patient safety and quality improvement initiatives. Students will learn quality improvement concepts and techniques and will practice the techniques in teams. Students will achieve a familiarity with definitions and measures of quality of health care in a variety of settings in addition to the public policy drivers of quality improvement. Interactive exercises and discussion will engage students in the challenges of behavior change and quality improvement and the role of public policy as a driver of improvement including financial incentives in public reporting. Students will review and create quality measures within their chosen field and develop a quality improvement project to improve a process or outcome. Assigned readings, video talks and lectures, online discussions, individual writing assignments, small group activities, and team projects will be used.

CHS
512
Hours
3
Introduction to Medical Care

Overview of Medicine by organ systems: Cardiovascular, Endocrine, Gastrointestinal, Pulmonary, Central Nervous System, Musculoskeletal, Nephrology, and Reproductive Systems. Selected topics in Dermatology, Hematology/Oncology, Addiction and Alcoholism and Infectious Diseases.

CHS
514
Hours
3
Disease Prevention & Care Management

This course focuses on the development of approaches for use by providing primary care to individuals across the lifespan with special emphasis on health promotion, disease prevention, risk reduction,and disease detection. Students will advance understanding of core concepts related to well-being in diverse populations, and will build on interprofessional collaborative practice principles. Students will also be introduced to public health issues on a global level, such as poverty, inequity, special populations and disease and prevention patterns.

CHS
515
Hours
3
Cultural Competency in Healthcare

The increasing cultural diversity in the United States has profound implications for population health science and practice. This seminar is designed to address a broad range of theoretical, research, and clinical issues related to cultural competency in healthcare. Using readings, class discussions and student presentations, the seminar will emphasize the role of ethnicity, class, culture, gender, sexual orientation, and disability in population health, and the impact of these factors on assessment, diagnosis and treatment. Students will take an assessment at the beginning and the end of class designed to determine the growth in student knowledge, understanding, acceptance, and behavior change in regard to cultural competence.

CHS
520
Hours
3
Basic Epidemiology

A course for students in health-related fields. The basic epidemiologic approach is developed; principles and methods are learned through readings (text and published studies), lectures, discussions, and the preparation of a research design by each student.

CHS
521
Hours
3
Introduction to Clinical Epidemiology

The purpose of this course is to teach the principles and practice of epidemiology as a science discipline. Objectives: 1. Understand the basic principles of epidemiology, 2. Conduct a critical appraisal of epidemiologic studies, 3. Be knowledgeable about the various types of study design, 4. Describe how epidemiology relates to public health and medical practice.

CHS
522
Hours
3
Community Clinical Proc

A combination of scheduled sessions and fieldwork activities. The fieldwork will consist of visiting with an assigned rural advisor, completing a rural community assessment, and assisting with community health screenings and education programs.

CHS
523
Hours
1-6
Indep Stdy Community Med

No description available.

CHS
524
Hours
3
Essentials of Population Health

An introductory graduate level course designed to teach learners to examine health issues from a population health perspective.

CHS
525
Hours
3
Biostatistics

A course in statistical methods and concepts particularly appropriate for biomedical research and health-related subjects. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, parametric and nonparametric procedures for one-group and two-group problems, contingency tables, and computer applications.

CHS
526
Hours
3
Health Informatics & Population Health Analytics

Students will become familiar with how electronic health record (EHR) data that can used to participate in quality improvement and research. Class will involve exploring the structure of data generated by EHRs and understanding how to manipulate the data and operationalize it for quality reporting and research. The goal of the class will be for clinicians and mangers to be able to produce data for MACRA, PCMH, and other common quality initiatives. In addition those with a research focus will get a hands on view of EHR data and how to use it to answer research questions.

CHS
527
Hours
3
Health Policy & Planning

Designed to assist the student in understanding the planning process and factors that influence and determine policy decisions.

CHS
528
Hours
3
Introduction to Qualitative Methods in Population Health

This course will provide an introduction to qualitative research methodologies as they are applied to the field of population health.

CHS
530
Hours
3
Principles of Stress Management

The purpose of this course is to help Rural Community Health and Agricultural Safety & Health graduate students, learn to identify, understand, and manage the stressors that most affect their lives. Students will be exposed to the latest research findings on the physical, psychological, sociological, and spiritual aspects of stress. In addition, students will be presented with an in-depth array of coping skills, including relaxation techniques, behavior change interventions, and strategies for defusing physiological arousal. Students will be introduced to the tools they need to cope with stress in an increasingly stressful world. Special emphasis will be placed on clinical concerns (e.g., methods for alleviating stress) for rural populations.

CHS
532
Hours
3
Comm Clinical Process II

A continuation of studies from CHS 522 that will include an introduction to basic physical assessment techniques and continuation of a community project.

CHS
534
Hours
3
Interprofessional Health Communication

This interprofessional course focuses on understanding roles, how to work in a team using a common language; presenting information that other team members can understand, contributing to safe and effective systems. Identify basic concepts of effective teamwork among professions with an emphasis on communication and teamwork.

Prerequisite(s): •3.0 undergraduate GPA (minimum) for undergraduate degree or last 60 hours •Bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited college or university •Acceptance into the certificate program
CHS
540
Hours
3
Rural Community Interaction I

The purpose of this course is to introduce participants to real life and practical application and topics related to rural medicine, with an emphasis on minority populations. The course is divided into two parts: a shadowing experience with a primary care provider working in a rural or underserved setting, and a seminar series. Additionally the course will include a special service learning project in order to further expose students to practical application of issues and topics in rural or underserved communities.

CHS
541
Hours
3
Rural Community Interaction II

The purpose of this course is a continuation of Rural Community Interaction I and introduces participants to additional real life and practical applications and topics related to rural medicine, with an emphasis on minority populations. The course is composed of two class projects of planning, implementation, and evaluation of a community screening event to be selected by the class. Each student will also complete a final paper (5 double-spaced typed pages) describing their cumulative experiences including lessons learned.

Prerequisite(s): CHS 540
CHS
550
Hours
6
Introduction to Fundamentals of Medicine I

Introduction to Fundamentals of Medicine I is an interdisciplinary course that provides a foundation for understanding the molecular and biochemical basis of cellular processes and whole body physiology, and initiates an appreciation for their impairment during various human diseases. The course will include an overview of the functional roles of various cellular constituents (e.g., protein, carbohydrate, lipid, nucleic acids) and the processes involved in their synthesis and degradation (e.g., thermodynamics, metabolic pathways, transcription/translation). This will involve not only an understanding of the mechanisms and pathways involved, but will also include an appreciation of their regulation/dysregulation during numerous perturbations of physiologic status (e.g., fed versus fasted, sedentary versus exercise) and disease states. IFM-I consists of a variety of instructional strategies (e.g., lectures, labs, small groups, team-based learning, self-study) to help develop critical thinking and problem solving skills, as well as build a knowledge base that is scientifically and clinically relevant to medical research and practice.

Prerequisite(s): Admission to Rural Community Health Program and Approval by the Instructor
CHS
551
Hours
6
Introduction to Fundamentals of Medicine II

Introduction to Fundamentals of Medicine II is an interdisciplinary course that provides a foundation basic pharmacology and cellular physiology. The basic principles of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics will be followed by an introduction to autonomic nervous system pharmacology that will serve as a basis for understanding the pharmacologic treatment of diseases. This course will also cover mechanisms of cellular homeostasis, transport, electrophysiology and communication, and will provide examples of disease states that result from abnormal functioning of these processes. This course consists of a variety of instructional strategies (e.g., lectures, labs, small groups, team-based learning, self-study) to help develop critical thinking and problem solving skills, as well as build a knowledge base that is scientifically and clinically relevant to medical research and practice.

Prerequisite(s): Admission to Rural Community Health Program and Approval by the Instructor
CHS
561
Hours
3
Healthcare Finance and Reimbursement

This course covers health insurance operations, principles, payment methods and contracts, and revenue cycle management. Key topics include private and public sector insurance, insurance contracts,underwriting principles, and inpatient and outpatient payment processes. This course presents an overview of financial systems in health care so that students will be able to understand the broad financial context within which organizational decision-making occurs. Additionally, selected financial management topics will be covered with an emphasis on providing future managers with the tools required to carry out their fiscal responsibilities.

CHS
563
Hours
3
Data Management

This course educate students on the basic tenets of relational databases, the components a database, and introductory-level querying through programming. These concepts will be taught through the lens of population health, and will show how many departments of health, health agencies, and large scale research studies store and retrieve data. The goal of this course is to introduce database management concepts to future analysts, thereby empowering their ability to effectively work with database administrators in their pursuits to generate tables for big data analytics. This course will use Microsoft SQL Server © to achieve its purpose and goals.

CHS
591
Hours
2
Clinical Correlations and Study Strategies in Biomedical Science I

Application of biomedical principles in a clinical context. Introduction to clinical reasoning and study skills.

CHS
599
Hours
1-6
Thesis Research

A candidate for the Master of Science in Population Health Sciences pursuing the thesis option is required complete six credit hours dedicated to original research under the direction of a faculty advisory committee. A written thesis is required to be presented, defended orally, and submitted to the faculty advisory committee for approval.

CHS
620
Hours
1-5
Ind Study In Prev Med

Research or directed reading in community medicine topics, including health care delivery, preventive medicine, and health policy aspects of other related topics.

CHS
622
Hours
3
Directed Research in Community Health

An advanced applied-research course designed to develop skills in the analysis and evaluation of health problems of community interest.

Prerequisite(s): CHS 520 and CHS 525
CHS
625
Hours
3
Advanced Epidemiology

This course will take an in-depth look at epidemiologic methods particularly as they relate to cardiovascular disease, cancer, and behavioral epidemiology. This is a second-level course on the conduct of epidemiologic research. It will focus on both the conceptual problems of applying the scientific/epidemiologic method and on the practical issues in carrying out of work.

Prerequisite(s): CHS 520
CHS
627
Hours
3
Multivar Meth Hlt Stats

Emphasis is on application and interpretation of statistical software that performs techniques such as multivariate analysis of variance, discriminant analysis, logistic regression, log-linear modeling, and factor analysis.

CHS
637
Hours
3
Adv Multivariate Meth Biostat

Topics will include exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, path analysis, structural equation models and other topics of interest to students.

Prerequisite(s): CHS 627
CHS
650
Hours
3
Outcomes Research in Population Health

This course examines the methods utilized in the design, implementation, and evaluation of research studies implemented in a healthcare setting. In this course, you will explore various research designs that can be used to evaluate studies with outcomes at the individual and organizational level. Both naturalistic (or observational) and experimental designed will be covered throughout the course. Various analytic approaches that are appropriate to examine the design, implementation, and evaluation of studies in the medical setting will be applied. Furthermore, students will be expected to develop a research protocol that demonstrates the mastery of core competencies obtained throughout the semester.

CHS
655
Hours
3
Population Health Applications (Non-Thesis)

The practicum is a planned, supervised, and evaluated work experience that compliments the student’s classroom education, and allows them the opportunity to apply the lessons learned in their course work. The practicum experience is designed to enhance student’s professional experience in the field of population health, and is key to a comprehensive understanding of population health in clinical settings. Success is defined by the exposure to valuable work experience, improvements in subject matter knowledge, mastery of specific competencies, and the development of relationships between the student, preceptor, and the site. The student is responsible for connecting with their peers, academic and professional networks to identifying and contact a suitable preceptor. The student is responsible for completing 120 hours under the guidance of their preceptor, and is required to document their completed hours on a regular basis. Only hours directly relating to the practicum learning objectives should be logged.

CHS
701
Hours
18
Clinical Clerkship

No description available.

CHS
702
Hours
18
Clinical Clerkship

Clinical clerkship.

CHS
801
Hours
18
Clinical Clerkship

No description available.

CHS
802
Hours
18
Clinical Clerkship

Clinical clerkship.

CHS
900
Hours
12
Residency

No description available.