College of Community Health Sciences

The College of Community Health Sciences (CCHS) is committed to the education of students in the health sciences.  CCHS offers two Master of Science degree programs.  The masters program in Population Health Sciences trains students on the integration of clinical care and public health practices to prevent, reduce and manage human disease.  The Rural Community Health masters program prepares students to be community health leaders in rural Alabama as health care providers.

CCHS is also the site of the Tuscaloosa Regional Campus of the University of Alabama School of Medicine. The Tuscaloosa Regional Campus offers the Primary Care Track and Rural Track for the School of Medicine. Third and fourth year medical students complete their training in Tuscaloosa and community placements.  In addition, the College operates a three-year family medicine residency program and specialized fellowship training programs.

CCHS welcomes students from disciplines other than medicine.  A variety of graduate-level courses are offered, as are research and training opportunities for students in nursing, health care management, nutrition, psychology, education, social work and other disciplines.

The courses listed below are open to qualified graduate students. Medical school and family practice residency curricula are published separately from this catalog.

CHS
515
Hours
3
Cultural Competency in Healthcare

The increasing cultural diversity in the United States has profound implications for population health science and practice. This course is designed to address a broad range of theoretical, research, ethical, and clinical issues related to cultural competency in healthcare.

CHS
540
Hours
3
Rural Community Interaction I

The purpose of this course is to introduce participants to real life and practical application and topics related to rural medicine, with an emphasis on minority populations. The course is divided into two parts: a shadowing experience with a primary care provider working in a rural or underserved setting, and a seminar series. Additionally the course will include a special service learning project in order to further expose students to practical application of issues and topics in rural or underserved communities.

CHS
541
Hours
3
Rural Community Interaction II

The purpose of this course is a continuation of Rural Community Interaction I and introduces participants to additional real life and practical applications and topics related to rural medicine, with an emphasis on minority populations. The course is composed of two class projects of planning, implementation, and evaluation of a community screening event to be selected by the class. Each student will also complete a final paper (5 double-spaced typed pages) describing their cumulative experiences including lessons learned.

Prerequisite(s): CHS 540
CHS
550
Hours
6
Introduction to Fundamentals of Medicine I

Introduction to Fundamentals of Medicine I is an interdisciplinary course that provides a foundation for understanding the molecular and biochemical basis of cellular processes and whole body physiology, and initiates an appreciation for their impairment during various human diseases. The course will include an overview of the functional roles of various cellular constituents (e.g., protein, carbohydrate, lipid, nucleic acids) and the processes involved in their synthesis and degradation (e.g., thermodynamics, metabolic pathways, transcription/translation). This will involve not only an understanding of the mechanisms and pathways involved, but will also include an appreciation of their regulation/dysregulation during numerous perturbations of physiologic status (e.g., fed versus fasted, sedentary versus exercise) and disease states. IFM-I consists of a variety of instructional strategies (e.g., lectures, labs, small groups, team-based learning, self-study) to help develop critical thinking and problem solving skills, as well as build a knowledge base that is scientifically and clinically relevant to medical research and practice.

Prerequisite(s): Admission to Rural Community Health Program and Approval by the Instructor
CHS
551
Hours
6
Introduction to Fundamentals of Medicine II

Introduction to Fundamentals of Medicine II is an interdisciplinary course that provides a foundation basic pharmacology and cellular physiology. The basic principles of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics will be followed by an introduction to autonomic nervous system pharmacology that will serve as a basis for understanding the pharmacologic treatment of diseases. This course will also cover mechanisms of cellular homeostasis, transport, electrophysiology and communication, and will provide examples of disease states that result from abnormal functioning of these processes. This course consists of a variety of instructional strategies (e.g., lectures, labs, small groups, team-based learning, self-study) to help develop critical thinking and problem solving skills, as well as build a knowledge base that is scientifically and clinically relevant to medical research and practice.

Prerequisite(s): Admission to Rural Community Health Program and Approval by the Instructor
CHS
595
Hours
1-3
Special Topics

Selected topics in Community Health Sciences offered by CCHS faculty members.

CHS
599
Hours
1-6
Thesis Research

A candidate for the Master of Science in Population Health Sciences pursuing the thesis option is required to complete six credit hours dedicated to original research under the direction of a faculty advisory committee. A written thesis is required to be presented, defended orally, and submitted to the faculty advisory committee for approval. Material covered will be of an advanced nature aimed at providing master's students with an understanding of the latest research and current developments within the field. Discussion and advisor guidance will be directed towards readings of research articles and development of research methodology, with the aim of producing an original research contribution that represents a novel development in the field, or a novel perspective on a pre-existing topic in the field.

CHS
620
Hours
1-5
Ind Study In Prev Med

Research or directed reading in community medicine topics, including health care delivery, preventive medicine, and health policy aspects of other related topics.

CHS
622
Hours
3
Directed Research in Community Health

An advanced applied-research course designed to develop skills in the analysis and evaluation of health problems of community interest.

Prerequisite(s): CHS 520 and CHS 525
CHS
627
Hours
3
Multivar Meth Hlt Stats

Emphasis is on application and interpretation of statistical software that performs techniques such as multivariate analysis of variance, discriminant analysis, logistic regression, log-linear modeling, and factor analysis.

CHS
660
Hours
4
Drug Delivery Beyond the Biological Barriers

This course provides an overview of drug discovery, formulation, and delivery with efforts to reflect on the past and peek into the future drug development. This course requires substantial knowledge of chemistry, mathematics, and physics, and basic courses in biological sciences.

CHS
661
Hours
1
Imaginary Logic of Advanced Drug Delivery Program

This graduate level course presents topics designed to bring together divergent thinking (imaginary) with convergent thinkers (logical) to provide a platform to train the next generation of graduate students to think horizontally to overcome the valley of death in drug discovery and bring new therapies to clinic. As a career preparation course, it aims to provide graduate students the depth and breadth of understanding in drug discovery and development that will be applicable throughout their careers, regardless of their research focus.

CHS
662
Hours
3
Formulations Science Lab

This research-based laboratory course provides training in the developing the next generation of drug delivery systems through a broad spectrum of techniques including synthesis of polyesters and their bioconjugation, characterization of polyesters using the state-of-the-art analytical tools, processing the polyesters into nanoparticulate drug carrier systems encapsulating diverse model drugs, and characterization of the nanoparticles for size, loading, encapsulation, release, and stability. For students who have interest and aspire to research careers in interdisciplinary advanced drug delivery, this course will provide basic training and experience for a smooth start for future laboratory work. This course requires substantial knowledge of chemistry, mathematics, and physics, and basic courses in biological sciences.

Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: CHS 660
CHS
663
Hours
3
Formulations Testing Lab

This research-based laboratory course that focuses on training students in testing the next generation of drug delivery systems. Students will be exposed to a broad spectrum of techniques (e.g., in vitro, ex vivo, in vivo). Students will be exposed to a variety of techniques including tissue processing for tissue mechanics, drugestimation, particle tracking, receptor binding, and histology and immunohistochemical analysis, and in vitro and ex vivo study designs. Students will have hands-on experience in a wide variety of microscopy and histology equipment. For students who have interest and aspire to research careers in interdisciplinary advanced drug delivery, this course will provide basic training and experience for a smooth start for future laboratory work involving pharmacology testing. This course requires substantial knowledge of chemistry, mathematics, and physics, and basic courses in biological sciences.

Prerequisite(s): CHS 662
CHS
699
Hours
1-12
Dissertation Research

This independent research course partially fulfills required doctoral level research dissertation hours toward the Ph.D. in the student’s field. A minimum of 18 dissertation hours are required, at 1-12 hours per semester. The course is conducted under the guidance of the Ph.D. advisor. The student must register for a minimum of 3 hours per semester in this course until reaching the required minimum of 18 credit hours. Thereafter, students must register for a minimum of 1 hour each semester in this course, maintaining continuous enrollment until degree completion.

Prerequisite(s): Admission to Candidacy
CHS
700
Hours
12-18
Clinical Clerkship

This course is designed to allow UASOM students to complete their MS3 clerkships on the Tuscaloosa campus. Material covered is defined by UASOM and the UASOM Primary Care Track curriculum. This is a 12 month curriculum and these courses are to define participants’ status as UA students during this time.

CHS
701
Hours
12-18
Clinical Clerkship

This course is designed to allow UASOM students to complete their MS3 clerkships on the Tuscaloosa campus. Material covered is defined by UASOM and the UASOM Primary Care Track curriculum. This is a 12 month curriculum and these courses are to define participants’ status as UA students during this time.

CHS
702
Hours
12-18
Clinical Clerkship

This course is designed to allow UASOM students to complete their MS3 clerkships on the Tuscaloosa campus. Material covered is defined by UASOM and the UASOM Primary Care Track curriculum. This is a 12 month curriculum and these courses are to define participants’ status as UA students during this time.

CHS
800
Hours
12-18
Clinical Clerkship

This course is designed to allow UASOM students to complete their MS3 clerkships on the Tuscaloosa campus. Material covered is defined by UASOM and the UASOM Primary Care Track curriculum. This is a 12 month curriculum and these courses are to define participants’ status as UA students during this time.

CHS
801
Hours
12-18
Clinical Clerkship

This course is designed to allow UASOM students to complete their MS3 clerkships on the Tuscaloosa campus. Material covered is defined by UASOM and the UASOM Primary Care Track curriculum. This is a 12 month curriculum and these courses are to define participants’ status as UA students during this time.

CHS
802
Hours
12-18
Clinical Clerkship

This course is designed to allow UASOM students to complete their MS3 clerkships on the Tuscaloosa campus. Material covered is defined by UASOM and the UASOM Primary Care Track curriculum. This is a 12 month curriculum and these courses are to define participants’ status as UA students during this time.

CHS
900
Hours
12
Residency

No description available.