This page contains a listing of all active courses in The University of Alabama's course inventory by College. Click on any tab above to view the course titles, credit hours, descriptions and prerequisites. 

College of Arts & Sciences Courses

AAST
100
Hours
1
“Call and Response”

This course is designed to generate student interest and excitement in African American Studies by giving students opportunities to explore facets of African American cultural experiences. Following an interdisciplinary approach, this course will allow students to discover the rich diversity of African American cultural practices such as music, visual arts, literature, storytelling, dance, and religious practice. This course allows students at UA and UAB to experience the expertise of faculty from both institutions. It is also web-enhanced and has components on both UA’s and UAB’s BlackBoard systems for which UA and UAB students will access.

AAST
201
SB
Hours
3
Intro African Amer Study

A basic outline of the diversity and complexity of the African-American experience in the United States: the early academic and social concerns of Black Studies advocates; the changes in the field's objectives that arise from its connections to contemporary social movements for Black Power, women's liberation and multiculturalism; and its major theoretical and critical debates.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
AAST
202
Hours
3
African American Lives

A cultural approach to African American lives, exploring the role of the individual, biography, and narrative in African American history and culture.

AAST
221
Hours
3
Contemporary In(queer)ies

In her essay “Queer and Now,” Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick offers a rumination on the political, epistemological and pedagogical imports of “queer” at that moment: “ That’s one of the things that ‘queer’ can refer to: the open mesh of possibilities, gaps, overlaps, dissonances and resonances, lapses and excesses of meaning when the constituent elements of anyone’s gender, of anyone’s sexuality aren’t made (or can’t be made) to signify monolithically.” This 3 credit hour course, takes up Sedgwick’s suggestion of the possibilities of “queer” to consider the development of queer theory, queer studies, and queer politics. Although this course is organized thematically across a number of disciplines, it also resists a kind of stringent categorization or segmentation- mirroring the energy that has characterized this interdisciplinary field. While paying attention to the seemingly endless possibilities associated with queer theory, this course is profoundly committed to as Sedgwick argues to keep “same-sex sexual expression at “the terms definitional center,” as not to “dematerialize any possibility of queerness itself.”.

AAST
222
Hours
3
LGBTQ Histories

During the past decade, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) Americans have achieved various forms of empowerment and visibility in the nation’s political, legal, social, and cultural arenas. However, LGBTQ persons continue to face various barriers to full equality and well-being including employment discrimination, high rates of homelessness among teens, violence, and inadequate access to health care. This 3 credit hour course places will focus on the events emergence of the last decade into a longer history of LGBTQ communities, visibility and politics that begins LGBTQ community in the late nineteenth 20th century and ends in the early twenty-first century. American Culture. During the semester, we will explore the historical development of LGBTQ identities, communities, politics, and cultural production. Together, we will analyze an array of materials including scholarly texts, oral histories, newspapers, films, photographs, art and political ephemera.

AAST
225
Hours
3
Black Women's Experiences in the South

Southern/Black/Woman. This demographic descriptor encompasses notable figures - Ida B. Wells, Bessie Smith, Condoleezza Rice, Beyoncé – and millions whose names and individual stories are often marginal to American memory and public policy. This course examines various aspects of Southern Black Women’s lives and labors, pain and pleasures, adventures and adversities from the nineteenth century to the present day. Students will analyze an array of materials including: memoirs/ autobiographies, oral histories, secondary scholarship, census data, paintings, photographs, film, television and music. Using in-class activities, discussion and writing assignments, this course addresses one central question: What can the academic study of Black Women’s experiences in the South reveal about gender, race, class, and sexuality in the United States (past and present)?.

AAST
226
Hours
3
Themes from Africa to America

An examination of the spread of religious life in the African America's emphasizing present institutions and practices; its African roots, its shape and function during slavery and its development from Emancipation to the present.

AAST
249
HU, L
Hours
3
African American Literature

Survey of African American literature from its earliest expressions to the present. In order to identify the aesthetics of the African American literary tradition, the course material includes spirituals, slave narratives, poetry, drama, autobiography, fiction, and nonfiction.

Prerequisite(s): (Undergraduate level EN 101 with minimum Grade of C- and Undergraduate level EN 102 with minimum Grade of C-) OR (Undergraduate level EN 103 with minimum Grade of C- or Undergraduate level EN 104 with minimum Grade of C-) OR (Undergraduate level EN 120 with minimum Grade of C- and Undergraduate level EN 121 with minimum Grade of C-)
Humanities, Literature
AAST
302
Hours
3
The Black Church

A survey of mainstream Christian expressions of black spirituality as well as other forms of sacred collective consciousness. Study of local churches and theology is encouraged.

AAST
303
Hours
3
Education Of Southern Blacks

A study of the "miseducation" of Africans in America. The course explores education for blacks from West Africa at the middle of the second millennium and early American society to the emergence of the separate school system of the 19th and 20th centuries.

AAST
304
Hours
3
Civil War Still Lives': Race, Memory, and the Politics of Reunion

For over 150 years, the Civil War occupies a prominent place in our national memory and has served to both unite and divide Americans. This course will explore the various ways in which Americans have chosen to remember their civil war through reunions, monuments and memorials, histories, literature, film, museums as well as other forms of popular culture. We will examine how memory of the war changed over time as well as the political implications for Civil War memory, the nation, and identity in understanding both historical and contemporary debates.

Prerequisite(s): None
AAST
319
Hours
3
19th Century Black History

Role of black Americans in American life from the 17th century to the beginning of the 20th century, with emphasis on the institutions and events of the 1800s.

AAST
320
Hours
3
20th Century Black History

The interrelationship of blacks and the industrial-urban environment of the United States.

AAST
321
Hours
3
African American Folk Art

This course will focus on analysis of object, created by African Americans variously classified as folk, self-taught, outsider artists. Material will address African origins. American transformations of traditional arts and crafts.

AAST
340
Hours
3
Women in the South

Examination of the cultural concepts, myths, and experiences of black and white Southern women from a variety of economic and social backgrounds. Special attention is given to the interaction of race, class, and gender in Southern women's lives. Texts include historical studies, autobiographies, biographies, oral histories, and novels written by and about women in the 19th- and 20th-century South.

AAST
341
Hours
3
African American Art

An examination of the work of formally trained 20th century African American painters, sculptors, and photographers in relation to broader currents in the social and cultural history of the United States. Examines ways in which African American art has alternately reflected, shaped, and challenged such important historical events and currents as the Harlem Renaissance, the Great Depression, the Cold War, the Civil Rights and Black Power movements, the women's movement, and contemporary identity politics. Also evaluates the contributions of selected artists in relation to such key art movements as Modernism, Social Realism, and Postmodernism.

AAST
350
Hours
3
Topics African American Lit

A cross-genre survey of African American literature, historical events, and critical movements. Authors may include Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Richard Wright, Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larson, Langston Hughes, and Toni Morrison.

AAST
352
Hours
3
Social Inequality

Analysis of inequities of wealth, power, and prestige; major theories of racial and cultural minorities; behavioral correlates of stratification; social mobility.

AAST
395
Hours
3
Special Topics

An examination of selected African American topics. May be repeated for a maximum of 18 hours.

AAST
401
Hours
3
Black Intellectual Thought

An upper level seminar designed to provide students with an in-depth study of major intellectual debates and mvoements that have shaped the politics, history and identities of the people of African descent in the United States and the African diaspura. The course will combine methodologies and concepts from multiple disciplines including, history, political theory, literature, women's studies, sociology, pyschology and philosophy.

Prerequisite(s): AAST 201 and AMS 201
AAST
402
Hours
3-9
Special Topics

An examination of selected African American topics. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours.

AAST
413
W
Hours
3
Communication & Diversity

Study and analysis of issues of diversity as they relate to groups in society and in communication fields. Emphasis is on the media's treatment of various groups in society. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
AAST
415
W
Hours
3
African American Rhetoric

A historical-critical investigation of African American public discourse from the Revolutionary era to the present, exploring rhetorical strategies for social change and building community. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
AAST
435
Hours
3
Black Feminism

This upper level undergraduate and graduate course exposes students to the key figures, texts and concepts that constitute black feminist thought.

Prerequisite(s): AAST 201 or WS 200
AAST
436
Hours
3
Gender and Black Masculinity

This course will examine the socio-historical perceptions and constructions of Black masculinities in various regions and periods. We will also examine the social, political, and economic conditions of Black male life in the contemporary period and interrogate representations of Black men and boys in U.S. culture and society in relation to the broader politics of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the post-civil rights era. Specific attention will be paid to the history of ideas and approaches that have shaped and defined our understanding of Black males. You will be introduced to historical and socio-cultural circumstances that affect Black males and the diverse nature of Black culture. This course will also attempt to heighten awareness and sensitivity to the contemporary problems affecting Black males and thus help discover and evaluate social policies and programs geared towards Black males.

AAST
488
Hours
3
Adv Study African American Lit

A special topics course that focuses on issues in African American literature.

AAST
490
Hours
1-6
AAST Independent Study

Independent study on any subject pertaining to African-American studies, under the supervision of a professor in the chosen field and/or Director of the program.

AAST
495
Hours
3
Special Topics

An examination of selected African American topics. May be repeated for a maximum of 18 hours.

AFS
101
Hours
1
Leadership Laboratory

Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) is a dynamic and integrated grouping of leadership developmental activities designed to meet the needs and expectations of prospective Air Force second lieutenants and complement the AFROTC academic program. Provides an introduction to the military profession, including applications in leadership, drill and ceremony, customs and courtesies and communication service. This course is for first-year AFROTC cadets.

AFS
102
Hours
1
Leadership Laboratory

Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) is a dynamic and integrated grouping of leadership developmental activities designed to meet the needs and expectations of prospective Air Force second lieutenants and complement the AFROTC academic program. Provides an introduction to the military profession, including applications in leadership, drill and ceremony, customs and courtesies and communication service. This course is for first-year AFROTC students/cadets.

AFS
110
Hours
1
Foundations Of The Usaf

'The Foundations of the United States Air Force,' is a survey course designed to introduce students to the United States Air Force and provides an overview of the basic characteristics, missions, and organization of the Air Force. Featured topics include: overview of ROTC, special programs offered through ROTC, mission and organization of the Air Force, brief history of the Air Force, introduction to leadership and leadership related issues, Air Force Core Values, Air Force officer opportunities, and an introduction to communication studies. AFS 101 Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences.

AFS
120
Hours
1
Foundations Of The Usaf

The Foundations of the United States Air Force is a survey course designed to introduce students to the United States Air Force and provides an overview of the basic characteristics, missions, and organization of the Air Force. Featured topics include: overview of ROTC, special programs offered through ROTC, mission and organization of the Air Force, brief history of the Air Force, introduction to leadership and leadership related issues, Air Force Core Values, Air Force officer opportunities, and an introduction to communication studies. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences.

Prerequisite(s) with concurrency:
AFS
201
Hours
1
Leadership Laboratory

Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) is a dynamic and integrated grouping of leadership developmental activities designed to meet the needs and expectations of prospective Air Force second lieutenants and complement the AFROTC academic program. Provides an introduction to the military profession, including applications in leadership, drill and ceremony, customs and courtesies and communication service. This course is for second-year AFROTC students/cadets.

AFS
202
Hours
1
Leadership Laboratory

Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) is a dynamic and integrated grouping of leadership developmental activities designed to meet the needs and expectations of prospective Air Force second lieutenants and complement the AFROTC academic program. Provides an introduction to the military profession, including applications in leadership, drill and ceremony, customs and courtesies and communication service. This course is for second-year AFROTC students/cadets.

AFS
230
Hours
1
Evolutn Of Us Air Power

A course designed to examine general aspects of air power from a historical perspective. The course covers the period from the first balloons and dirigibles to the space-age systems of the Global War on Terror. Historical examples are provided to show the development of Air Force core functions to demonstrate the evolution of what has become today's USAF. Furthermore, the course examines several fundamental truths associated with war in the third dimension, e.g., principles of war and tenets of air power. As a whole, this course provides the students with a knowledge-level understanding for the general employment of air power, from an institutional, doctrinal, and historical perspective. In addition, what the students learned about the Air Force Core Values in AS100 will be reinforced through the use of operational examples, and they will complete several writing and briefing assignments to meet Air Force communication skills requirements. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences.

AFS
240
Hours
1
Evolutn Of Us Air Power

A course designed to examine general aspects of air power from a historical perspective. The course covers the period from the first balloons and dirigibles to the space-age systems of the Global War on Terror. Historical examples are provided to show the development of Air Force core functions to demonstrate the evolution of what has become today's USAF. Furthermore, the course examines several fundamental truths associated with war in the third dimension, e.g., principles of war and tenets of air power. As a whole, this course provides the students with a knowledge-level understanding for the general employment of air power, from an institutional, doctrinal, and historical perspective. In addition, what the students learned about the Air Force Core Values in AS100 will be reinforced through the use of operational examples, and they will complete several writing and briefing assignments to meet Air Force communication skills requirements. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing cadets with followership experiences.

Prerequisite(s) with concurrency:
AFS
301
Hours
1
Leadership Laboratory

Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) is a dynamic and integrated grouping of leadership developmental activities designed to meet the needs and expectations of prospective Air Force second lieutenants and complement the AFROTC academic program. Provides an introduction to the military profession, including applications in leadership, drill and ceremony, customs and courtesies and communication service. This course is for third-year AFROTC cadets.

AFS
302
Hours
1
Leadership Laboratory

Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) is a dynamic and integrated grouping of leadership developmental activities designed to meet the needs and expectations of prospective Air Force second lieutenants and complement the AFROTC academic program. Provides an introduction to the military profession, including applications in leadership, drill and ceremony, customs and courtesies and communication service. This course is for third-year AFROTC cadets.

AFS
350
Hours
3
USAF Leadership Studies

A study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, leadership ethics, and communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts being studied. A mandatory. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences in officer-type activities, giving students the opportunity to apply leadership and management principles of this course. Students enrolled in AFS 350 and AFS 360 courses are AS 300-level cadets who are in their junior year of AFROTC program, unless approved otherwise.

AFS
360
Hours
3
USAF Leadership Studies

A study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation systems, leadership ethics, and communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of the concepts being studied. A mandatory. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences in officer-type activities, giving students the opportunity to apply leadership and management principles of this course. Students enrolled in AFS 350 and AFS 360 courses are AS 300-level cadets who are in their junior year of AFROTC program, unless approved otherwise.

AFS
401
Hours
1
Leadership Laboratory

Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) is a dynamic and integrated grouping of leadership developmental activities designed to meet the needs and expectations of prospective Air Force second lieutenants and complement the AFROTC academic program. Provides an introduction to the military profession, including applications in leadership, drill and ceremony, customs and courtesies and communication service. This course is for fourth-year AFROTC cadets.

AFS
402
Hours
1
Leadership Laboratory

Leadership Laboratory (LLAB) is a dynamic and integrated grouping of leadership developmental activities designed to meet the needs and expectations of prospective Air Force second lieutenants and complement the AFROTC academic program. Provides an introduction to the military profession, including applications in leadership, drill and ceremony, customs and courtesies and communication service. This course is for fourth-year AFROTC cadets.

AFS
470
Hours
3
National Security Affair

Examines the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on the military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military professionalism. Within this structure, continued emphasis is given to refining communication skills. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences in officer-type activities, giving students the opportunity to apply leadership and management principles of this course. Students enrolled in AFS 470 and AFS 480 courses are AS 400-level cadets who are in their final academic year of AFROTC program, unless approved otherwise.

AFS
480
Hours
3
National Security Affair

Examines the national security process, regional studies, advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special topics of interest focus on the military as a profession, officership, military justice, civilian control of the military, preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military professionalism. Within this structure, continued emphasis is given to refining communication skills. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced leadership experiences in officer-type activities, giving students the opportunity to apply leadership and management principles of this course. Students enrolled in AFS 470 and AFS 480 courses are AS 400-level cadets who are in their final academic year of AFROTC program, unless approved otherwise.

AMS
100
Hours
1
Special Topics

Selected American topics for lower-division undergraduate students offered by American studies faculty members or supervised teaching assistants. Some examples include the following five-week, one-hour courses: African-American Star Athletes, Superbowl Ads, Stand Up Comedy, Disney's America, and Why Eat Local?.

AMS
101
Hours
1
Special Topics

Selected American topics for lower-division undergraduates offered by American Studies faculty members or supervised teaching assistants.

AMS
102
Hours
1
Special Topics

Selected American topics for lower-division undergraduates offered by American Studies faculty members or supervised teaching assistants.

AMS
103
Hours
1
Special Topics

Selected American topics for lower-division undergraduates offered by American Studies faculty members or supervised teaching assistants.

AMS
104
Hours
1
Special Topics

Selected American topics for lower-division undergraduates offered by American Studies faculty members or supervised teaching assistants.

AMS
105
Hours
1
Special Topics

Selected American topics for lower-division undergraduates offered by American Studies faculty members or supervised teaching assistants.

AMS
106
Hours
1
Special Topics

Selected American topics for lower-division undergraduates offered by American Studies faculty members or supervised teaching assistants.

AMS
150
HU
Hours
3
Introduction to American Studies: Arts and Values

Exploration of the relation between the arts - popular, folk, and elite - and American culture in four selected periods: Victorian America, the '20s and '30s, World War II and the Postwar Era, and the '60s. Class presentations and discussions revolve around novels, movies, art, music, artifacts, and readings about the periods. This course is team taught by all the members of the American studies faculty. Offered fall semester.

Humanities
AMS
151
HU
Hours
3
Intro American Studies: World Nation & Region

A broad survey of American culture formed by global, national, and regional influences. The first section, "World," looks at the United States as a product and shaper of international movements, ideas, and cultures from 1500 to the present. The second section, "Nation," examines the creation of a distinctly American identity between 1790 and 1890 that ultimately incorporated and reflected global issues. The third section, "Regions," focuses on the South and other regions as contributors to and consequences of national and global interactions. Team taught by the entire AMS faculty, lectures will include topics on film, music, literature, art, sports, and other cultural artifacts. Offered spring semester.

Humanities
AMS
200
Hours
3
Special Topics Amer Stud

Selected American topics for lower-division undergraduate students offered by AMS faculty members or Americanists from related departments. Recent examples include The Asian-American Experience, The American Road, The Sporting Life, Baseball Since 1945, and Twilight Zone Culture. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours.

AMS
201
SB
Hours
3
Intro African Amer Study

This course provides a basic outline of the diversity and complexity of the African American experience in the United States. It surveys the early academic and social concern of Black Studies advocates; the changes in the field's objectives that arise from its connections to contemporary social movements for Black Power, women's liberation, and multiculturalism; and its major theoretical and critical debates.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
AMS
203
HU
Hours
3
Introduction to Southern Studies

This discussion-based course introduces students to major texts and interdisciplinary methodologies in the field of Southern Studies. Traversing epochs from before the Civil War until after the Civil Rights Movement, we will scrutinize the interplay between course materials (autobiographies, fictional texts, historical accounts, and films) and major political, cultural, and social forces influencing the region and the nation.

Humanities
AMS
204
HU
Hours
3
Introduction to Western American Studies

A lecture/discussion course utilizing a biographical approach to the salient themes, issues, and episodes of the American West. Some of these lives are real, some of them imagined, and others are a little of each. All of them, however, reveal much about both region and nation and how each has changed over time.

Humanities
AMS
205
HU
Hours
3
Dirty Jobs

This course explores jobs that get you "dirty." Work is one of the aspects that most shapes individual lives, and many lines of work are viewed as dangerous, dirty, or somehow unsavory by American society. This course uses films, TV shows, written narratives, and music to explore different types of "dirty" work in the United States.

Humanities
AMS
206
HU
Hours
3
Native American Studies

There’s a lot more to Native Americans than the first Thanksgiving, the Battle of the Little Bighorn, and casinos (although we’ll discuss all those things too). This course will introduce you to the diversity of Native American societies, their histories, and their significant influence on American culture, contemporary U.S. policy, and law. We’ll be examining everything from ancient archaeological artifacts to contemporary film and literature as we investigate the vital role of indigenous people in North America. As much as possible, we’ll be directly engaging Native sources and voices as we explore the struggles over land, sovereignty, and culture that have shaped (and continue to shape) Native American lives.

Humanities
AMS
208
Hours
3
Rock, Hip-Hop, and Country

This course will offer an introduction to popular music that young Americans used for two generations, to root their aesthetics, center their values, and test their ethical allegiances.

AMS
222
Hours
3
Modern Gay America: Introduction to LGBTQ Histories

During the past decade, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) Americans have achieved various forms of empowerment and visibility in the nation’s political, legal, social, and cultural arenas. However, LGBTQ persons continue to face various barriers to full equality and well-being including employment discrimination, high rates of homelessness among teens, violence, and inadequate access to health care. This 3 credit hour course places the events of the last decade into a longer history of LGBTQ communities, visibility and politics that begins in the late nineteenth century and ends in the early twenty-first century. During the semester, we will explore the historical development of LGBTQ identities, communities, politics, and cultural production. Together, we will analyze an array of materials including scholarly texts, oral histories, newspapers, films, photographs, art and political ephemera.

Prerequisite(s): None
AMS
225
Hours
3
Black Women’s Experiences in the South

Southern/Black/Woman. This demographic descriptor encompasses notable figures - Ida B. Wells, Bessie Smith, Condoleezza Rice, Beyoncé – and millions whose names and individual stories are often marginal to American memory and public policy. This course examines various aspects of Southern Black Women’s lives and labors, pain and pleasures, adventures and adversities from the nineteenth century to the present day. Students will analyze an array of materials including: memoirs/ autobiographies, oral histories, secondary scholarship, census data, paintings, photographs, film, television and music. Using in-class activities, discussion and writing assignments, this course addresses one central question: What can the academic study of Black Women’s experiences in the South reveal about gender, race, class, and sexuality in the United States (past and present)?.

Prerequisite(s): None
AMS
231
HU
Hours
3
Contemporary America

This course analyzes the changing nature of American values for the period dating from the 1970s through the 2000s by examining key developments in the everyday life patterns and cultural expressions of Americans in contexts that range from the local to the international. In doing so, we will draw connections between the economic and political contexts of these decades and contemporaneous works of creative expression and popular culture. This course also will serve as an introduction to the types of interdisciplinary research methods used in American Studies. Offered fall and spring semesters.*.

Humanities
AMS
300
Hours
3
Special Topics

Selected American topics for advanced undergraduate students, offered by American Studies faculty members or Americanists from related departments. Recent examples include American Hobo Subculture, World War II and Modern Memory, Women's Liberation Movement, Justice and Civil Society, Southern Sexual Cultures, and Cultures of American Slavery. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours.

Prerequisite(s): Six hours of Humanities and/or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor.
AMS
303
Hours
3
Education Of Southern Blacks

A study of the "miseducation" of Africans in America. The course explores education for blacks from West Africa at the middle of the second millennium and early American society to the emergence of the separate school system of the 19th and 20th centuries.

AMS
304
Hours
3
Civil War Still Lives!: Race, Memory, and Politics of Reunion

For over 150 years, the Civil War occupies a prominent place in our national memory and has served to both unite and divide Americans. This course will explore the various ways in which Americans have chosen to remember their civil war through reunions, monuments and memorials, histories, literature, film, museums as well as other forms of popular culture. We will examine how memory of the war changed over time as well as the political implications for Civil War memory, the nation, and identity in understanding both historical and contemporary debates. We will pay particular attention to the way in which the war has been remembered and commemorated here at the University of Alabama.

Prerequisite(s): 6 SH of humanities or social sciences or permission of the instructor.
AMS
310
W
Hours
3
The Latinx Experience

This course focuses on the history of people of Latin American descent (Latinas/os) living in the United States. Although we will examine communities comprised of people of Central and South American descent, the focus of this course will be on the four largest Latinx groups: those of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban and Dominican descent. Students will become familiar with issues that have affected different Latinx populations in the United States: migration patterns, cultural interaction, community and cultural formation; and racial formations. We will also examine relations among Latinx and European immigrants, and consider the affects of US intervention and imperialism in Latin America on US Latinx communities. Lectures, readings, and films will explore connections between the past and the present and provide students a forum to express their own viewpoints on the legacy of this history.

Prerequisite(s): Six hours of Humanities and/or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor.
Writing
AMS
315
Hours
3
Work and Workers Since 1865

Examines the history of workers - men and women, paid and unpaid, of different racial and ethnic groups, in different regions of the United States - from 1865 to the present.

Prerequisite(s): Six hours of Humanities and/or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor.
AMS
316
Hours
3
Labor on Film

This course examines the ability of film to successfully portray the history of labor in the US and how present events and attitudes shape portrayals of past events.

Prerequisite(s): Six hours of Humanities and/or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor.
AMS
318
Hours
3
Amusement and Tourism in America

This course explores the centrality of amusement and tourism in defining the American pursuit of happiness. The course examines varied forms of leisure culture that emerged in the 19th century and exploded in popularity throughout the 20th century. By asserting connections between a wide range of amusement and tourist activities, the course provides a framework for understanding how Americans at play participate in a vibrant component of American social, economic, and aesthetic history.

Prerequisite(s): Six hours of Humanities and/or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor.
AMS
320
Hours
3
American Popular Humor

This course explores major writers, performers, works, and themes of American humor that have achieved enduring popularity among mass audiences. It examines the social and historical contexts that reverberate in humor produced in the United States and focuses on three persistently popular mediums: prose and performance; film; and the television situation comedy.

Prerequisite(s): Six hours of Humanities and/or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor.
AMS
321
Hours
3
African American Folk Art

An examination of the objects created by African Americans variously classified as "folk," "self-taught," and "outsider" artists. Course material will address the African origins and American transformations of traditional arts and crafts (architecture, pottery, iron work, and quilting) as well as the work of selected 20th-century artists in such media as painting, sculpture, and assemblage. Key concerns will include not only analysis and cultural/historical contextualization of these artists and their works but also political and theoretical debates with respect to issues of collection, modes of exhibition, and use of the above-listed classifications.

Prerequisite(s): Six hours of Humanities and/or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor.
AMS
323
W
Hours
3
Into the Wild: Nature and American Popular Imagination

This course examines the often contentious and always passionate American relationship with “nature,” an idea as much as a physical reality. Students consider the varying ways that nature has been imagined over a wide range of time periods and through the lenses of various forms of creative expression and cultural practices. The course explores how our complex relationship with “nature” has influenced American culture at large, its history and mainstream values.

Prerequisite(s): Six hours of Humanities and/or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor.
Writing
AMS
325
Hours
3
America West And 19th Century

Few things remained so central to the 19th American century experience as the West, a region to be explored, inhabited, and incorporated into an expanding urban-industrial society. From Lewis and Clark to Buffalo Bill, this lecture/discussion course examines the relationship between America and the West as it developed throughout the 19th century.

Prerequisite(s): Six hours of Humanities and/or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor.
AMS
326
Hours
3
The Modern West

This lecture/discussion course examines the growth of the American West during the 20th century as both the embodiment of modernity and, as mythic imagination, an escape from the very modernity it represents.

Prerequisite(s): Six hours of Humanities and/or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor.
AMS
327
Hours
3
The American Western

Since its creation toward the close of the 19th century, the western has been the most popular genre in American film history. No popular genre has generated anything like the kind of sustained attention, enthusiasm, interest, passion, anger, or debate as the American western. Which is the focus of the course: a chronological treatment of the on-going relationship between the western film and the meaning of modern America.

Prerequisite(s): Six hours of Humanities and/or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor.
AMS
335
W
Hours
3
American Pop Music

Recent scholarship has shifted popular music history from folk roots and rock rebellion to pop: commercial, accomodating, but no less fascinating amalgamations. This class will range from blackface mistrelsy in the 1800s to American Idol today, defining mainstreams rather than undergrounds. Pop music performed capitalism, but it also performed democracy. Sorting out that process will be the task.

Prerequisite(s): Six Semester Hours of Humanities and/or Social Sciences or Instructor's Permission.
Writing
AMS
340
W
Hours
3
Women in the South

What insights into American experience are afforded by reading nineteenth- and twentieth-century texts in which Southern women engage questions of gender, class, race, labor, and region? This class will explore fictional and nonfictional prose by and about Southern women in order to examine how historical, cultural, and sociopolitical factors have shaped the lives and writings of women in the South. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): Six Semester Hours of American Studies or Instructor's Permission.
Writing
AMS
341
Hours
3
African American Art

An examination of the work of formally trained 20th century African American painters, sculptors, and photographers in relation to broader currents in the social and cultural history of the United States. Examines ways in which African American art has alternately reflected, shaped, and challenged such important historical events and currents as the Harlem Renaissance, the Great Depression, the Cold War, the Civil Rights and Black Power movements, the Women's Movement, and contemporary identity politics. Also evaluates the contributions of selected artists in relation to such key art movements as Modernism, Social Realism, and Postmodernism.

Prerequisite(s): Six hours of Humanities and/or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor.
AMS
352
Hours
3
American Folklore

This course offers a survey of such genres of American folk culture expression as ghost stories, urban legends, foodways, music, and folk art—paying special attention to how these diverse forms of expression reflect and shape particular regional, ethnic, class, and gender identities. Course materials include ethnographic writing, sound recordings, film, and folklore scholarship. The course also will devote attention to the competing definitions of “folk” and “folklore” prevalent from the late 19th century to the present. Assignments will emphasize student collection and analysis of original folklore material.

Prerequisite(s): 6 SH Humanities or Social Sciences or permission of instructor.
AMS
364
Hours
3
The Beatles Era

Interdisciplinary investigation of American culture from the Kennedy assassination in 1963 to the Kent State University massacre in 1970 using the popular cultural explosion of the Beatles as a prism that informs the whole.

Prerequisite(s): Six Semester Hours of Humanities and/or Social Science Courses or Instructor's Permission
AMS
367
Hours
3
The American Game

Lecture topics, readings, and classroom discussions will pursue major connections between baseball and American society from 1880 to the present: (1) the modernization of America and the rise of an urban, industrial game; (2) baseball and race; and (3) postwar America and baseball.

Prerequisite(s): Six hours of Humanities and/or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor.
AMS
380
W
Hours
3
Imagining the Indian: Native Americans on Page and Screen

Native American imagery is widespread in American culture, from butter packaging to sports mascots and from children’s picture books to epic films. These depictions have embedded ideas about American Indians—often romanticized, stereotyped, or just inaccurate ideas—in the imaginations of millions of readers and film-goers. In this course, we will examine representations of Native Americans in art, writing, film, music, and more, ranging from early encounters between Natives and newcomers to contemporary pop culture. We’ll consider continuities and changes in how Indians have been imagined by outsiders, while also exploring Native self-representation in the face of cultural appropriation and stereotyping. We’ll explore a variety of methods and sources as we reflect on the pervasiveness of ideas about, and images of, Natives in American culture.

Prerequisite(s): Six hours of Humanities and/or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor.
Writing
AMS
400
Hours
1-3
Internship

An internship opportunity that combines independent study and practical fieldwork experience focusing on a particular problem or topic related to American culture and experience. Examples are internships in archival fieldwork, material culture fieldwork, museum management, and sound recordings. Credits earned in this course are applicable to the major and minor in American studies but are not counted in 400-level requirement. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.

AMS
401
Hours
3
Black Intellectual Thought

An upper level seminar designed to provide students with an in-depth study of major intellectual debates and movements that have shaped the politics, history and identities of the people of African descent in the United States and the African diaspora. The course will combine methodologies and concepts from multiple disciplines including history, political theory, literature, women's studies, sociology, psychology and philosophy.

AMS
402
Hours
3
Special Topics

Selected African American topics for advanced undergraduate students. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours.

AMS
403
UH
Hours
3
Honors Research - Ams

Internship opportunity that combines guided and independent study with on- or off-campus research experience involving a particular methodological approach to American culture and experience. Examples are social science methods, oral history, original manuscript research, and technology.

University Honors
AMS
405
Hours
1-3
Directed Study

May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.

AMS
406
Hours
1-3
Directed Study

Independent study in American Studies.

AMS
407
W
Hours
3
Landscapes of the South

A study of environmental and cultural landscapes of the American South, as altered and used by successive waves of native peoples, explorers, immigrants, laborers, industrialists, and urban builders, addressing historical and contemporary environmental challenges. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
AMS
412
W
Hours
3
On The Road

This course examines the American love affair with the open road. It considers the dramatic influence of car culture on the national imagination and the many ways it permeates and defines the United States. Drawing from an array of literary, historical, and cultural sources, the course encourages students to examine how writers, filmmakers, and artists in all mediums demonstrate the pervasiveness of the road in our historical, literary, and cultural imagination.

Prerequisite(s): 9 SH Humanities/ and or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor
Writing
AMS
415
Hours
3
Service Learning

Course examines immigrant journey and life in American South to gain an understanding of historical and contemporary issues through research and service.

Prerequisite(s): 9 SH Humanities/ and or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor
AMS
416
W
Hours
3
American Environmental Thought in a Global Context

Popular conceptions of nature hold extraordinary power in shaping our responses and policies toward both the geophysical world and built environments. This interdisciplinary course examines key concepts and controversies in American thought about nature since before colonization. Using accounts from various regions, the course explores evolving conceptions of nature and justice, competing claims about race and class, and changing institutional responses and remedies to environmental degradation in the context of global change. The course is highly interactive, inviting critical thinking about the human place in the physical world. We read and discuss ecological views as presented in colonial writings, slave narratives, Transcendentalist thought, Gilded Age preservationist and conservationist debates, and the work of Progressive Era occupational health specialists and ecologists. We give specific attention to twentieth century social movements for environmental public health, examining contemporary approaches, including eco-feminism, environmental justice, and sustainability.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.
Writing
AMS
420
Hours
3
Mark Twain's America: America's Mark Twain

This course employs the life, work, and times of America’s most celebrated author to examine American popular culture from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. In addition to exploring his major works and his times, the course considers his impact on popular culture to this day—from film adaptations of his work, to pop-culture references, to the traditions of American humor and cultural criticism.

Prerequisite(s): 9 SH Humanities/ and or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor
AMS
421
W
Hours
3
Writer & Artist in America

This course offers a comparative examination of responses by 20th century literary and visual artists to perceived social crises and challenges to American cultural values, such as sex in the early 20th century American city, working class struggles during the Great Depression, issues of atomic anxiety during the early years of the Cold War, the ethical dilemmas of the Vietnam War, the perils of the AIDS/HIV crisis, and the flourishing of contemporary consumer culture. The course also introduces several important movements in twentieth century American arts and letters, including Naturalism, Modernism, Social Realism, the Beat movement, Social Surrealism, and Postmodernism.

Prerequisite(s): 9 SH Humanities/ and or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor
Writing
AMS
422
W
Hours
3
Popular Culture in America

A selective survey and analysis of 20th century U.S. popular culture-- particularly, comic books, fan culture, television, music, advertising, and sports. Examines ways in which popular culture has reflected and shaped aspects of American society such as gender ideologies, economics, race, class, and regional identity.

Prerequisite(s): 9 SH Humanities/ and or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor
Writing
AMS
423
W
Hours
3
The Roots of American Music

This class surveys American music from ragtime, blues, and hillbilly to Broadway, Hollywood musicals, and swing jazz. Our focus will be on commercial mainstreams and democratic audiences – how selling sound led to different identities being expressed through taste and style. Race, gender, class, sexuality, age, technology, and the music business will all factor as we move from blackface minstrelsy in the 1800s to World War II. We will listen closely to several songs each week, connecting music to larger themes through primary and secondary sources, regular writing, and in-class discussion.

Prerequisite(s): 9 SH Humanities/ and or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor.
Writing
AMS
429
W
Hours
3
America between the Wars

Explores first two decades of America's "Modern Times" (1919-1941) when Americans redefined themselves and their society embracing and debating (sometimes hotly) old beliefs, new conceptions, and the implications of a machine-driven, modern-mass society. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): 9 SH Humanities/ and or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor
Writing
AMS
430
Hours
3
Special Topics

Selected American topics for advanced undergraduate majors in American studies, offered by American Studies faculty members or Americanists from related departments. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.

Prerequisite(s): Nine Semester Hours of humanities or social science courses or Instructor's Permission
AMS
439
W
Hours
3
Urban Spaces: The Nature of Cities

This interdisciplinary social science course provides an introduction to the cultural and physical ecology of cities, focusing primarily on urbanization in the United States from the late 19th century to the present. Course readings include classical scholars in urbanism and urban design. Contemporary urban environmental histories explore population shifts and land use along the urban gradient from the suburbs to urban centers, with attention to water, sewer, and transportation infrastructure, pollution, and urban sprawl. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
AMS
445
W
Hours
3
The "Good War"

Examination of selected topics from the American experience during the Second World War. Topics include the Homefront, the Holocaust, race relations, the emergence of American air power, and the impact of the war on American memory and postwar American society. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): 9 SH Humanities/ and or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor.
Writing
AMS
446
W
Hours
3
Gender and Environment

This course examines histories of concepts of nature and gender, philosophies of eco-feminism, and accounts of gender-based efforts for environmental reform. Texts include histories of environmental conceps and reform campaigns, broadly conceived, including slave narratives, accounts of experiences in the women's club movement, the conservation movement, and Progressive Era occupational and public health reform, along with more well-known twentieth centruy nature writers, contemporary scholars, and activists. Particular attention is paid to women whose identities are defined in part by their status as immigrants, women of color, or in other marginalized categories. Case studies explore global environmental reform as well as U.S. experiences. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
AMS
460
Hours
3
Race & Ethnicity in US Labor

This course is designed to familiarize students with the important topics, themes, and methodologies in the study of race and ethnicity in U.S. labor. Throughout the semester, the class will examine the lives of working women and men and their roles in the social, political, and economic development of the United States. The class will analyze the roll of gender, race, and ethnicity at home and in the workplace and examine how scholars have studied the people, events and institutions in this field.

Prerequisite(s): Nine Semester Hours of American Studies Courses or Instructor's Permission
AMS
465
W
Hours
3
Fictions of American Identity

An examination of American literature and culture from before the Civil War until after the Civil Rights Movement. Representations of American experience in essays, novels, poems, short stories, social reformist tracts, and the visual arts will be studied in the context of social and political debates over slavey, national identity, women's roles, immigration and assimilation, social mobility, urbanization, sexual mores, consumer culture, and race relations. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): 9 SH Humanities/ and or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor.
Writing
AMS
470
W
Hours
3
Natives and Newcomers: Cross-Cultural Encounters in Early America

The colonization efforts of European empires in the early modern period led to cross-cultural encounters between societies previously unfamiliar with one another, introducing each of them to unfamiliar ideas, cultures, political systems, and landscapes and changing their lives in profound ways. This course explores the complex interactions between Native American, European, and African peoples in North America, with a particular focus on the region that is currently the Southeastern United States. Such cross-cultural contact could result in valuable collaborations, deep misunderstandings, violence, or contests for power. How were interactions with unfamiliar peoples described and understood by Native Americans, Europeans, and African peoples in North America? How did the circulation of peoples and cultures shape ideas about ‘America’ and ‘Americaness’? Is ‘encounter’ a single event, or a long process? This course meets a college core writing requirement; a demonstration of writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): Six hours of Humanities and/or Social Sciences courses or permission of instructor.
Writing
AMS
476
W
Hours
3
Constructing the American Rev.

From the Declaration of Independence to the Civil War, Americans have continually tried to provide narrative shape and cultural significance to their national orgins. Through the analysis of primary and secondary sources (political tracts, art works, histories, biographies, fiction, and other artifacts), this course will explore the relationship between the eighteenth-century revolutionaries' and their ninetheenth-century heirs' cultural construction of the Revolution. Simply put, this course is about how people in the past have thought about their own past. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): Nine Semester Hours of American Studies Courses or Instructor's Permission
Writing
AMS
480
Hours
3
Democracy in America

Throughout the first half of the nineteenth century, Americans prided themselves on their democratic politics, industrial progress, science and technology, religious faiths, capitalist tendencies, and control over nature. No other person captured the essence of American society and manners more than the French aristocrat, Alex de Tocqueville, who traveled to the United States in the 1830s and published his famous work, Democracy in America. Using Tocqueville's observations as well as fiction, autobiography, painting, politics, and more, this course explores how ordinary Americans presented themselves as a democratic people from 1800 to 1865.

Prerequisite(s): Nine Semester Hours of American Studies Courses or Instructor's Permission
AMS
491
Hours
3
American Period Seminar

In-depth study of a particular period or era in American historical experience. Recent examples include the Ragtime Era, the Jazz Age, the Great Depression, the Season of 1954-55, the '60s, Contemporary America, the Romantic Revolutionaries (1905-14), the Postwar Era, American Avant Garde, the South and '30s Expression, the Civil Rights Movement, the American '20s, the '50s, America between the Wars, the Colonial Period, the Aspirin Age, Postmodern America, Contemporary America, and Writing West.

Prerequisite(s): Nine Semester Hours of American Studies Courses or Instructor's Permission
AMS
492
Hours
3
American Topic Seminar

Study of special topics within the American cultural experience. Recent examples include American Thought, Sports in American Life, American Perspectives on the Environment, the Civil Rights Movement, the Picture Press, Music and Ethnicity, the Politics of Culture, Regionalism, Homelessness in America, American Autobiography, American Monuments, Southern Popular Culture, Politics and Culture, Historical Memory, America by Design, Women in America, Race in America, 19th-Century Popular Culture, and Disasters in America.

Prerequisite(s): Nine Semester Hours of American Studies Courses or Instructor's Permission
ANT
100
SB
Hours
3
Intro To Anthropology

This course introduces students to the subfields of anthropology and demonstrates the benefits of a holistic approach to understanding globalization, multiculturalism, and cultural diversity. The concepts of evolution, human prehistory, language, and culture are explored as well as the diversity of human cultural patterns, including variations in marriage, kinship, and religion. SB Credit.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
ANT
102
SB
Hours
3
Intro Cultural Anthropology

An introduction to the discipline of cultural anthropology, the branch of anthropology that examines the rules and behaviors of contemporary human cultures. The course will demonstrate the importance of a holistic approach to understanding human diversity, and compare and contrast the various developments cultures use to tackle the universal problems of human living. SB Credit.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
ANT
103
SB
Hours
3
Discoveries In Archaeology

This course examines the major archaeological discoveries of the last two centuries that have led to significant insight about the nature of human organization. Not only will some of the broader cultural patterns in human prehistory be explored such as the origins of writing, religion, art, calendar systems, agriculture, and cities, but we will also learn about several remarkable archaeological sites and phenomena, including Stonehenge, the pyramids of Egypt, upper Paleolithic cave paintings, Machu Picchu and many other impressive achievements of the past.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
ANT
106
SB
Hours
3
Indians Of North America

Comprehensive overview of the prehistory, history, and modern day cultural diversity of Native Americans throughout North America. Historical and technological developments of different native groups are explored including changes as a result of European contact and the more recent attempts to revitalize Native American culture.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
ANT
107
Hours
3
Intro To Archaeology

Overview of the methods archaeologists use to study prehistoric cultures and an introduction to the study of human culture over the past two million years.

ANT
113
Hours
3
Indians Of Deep South

Introduction to the Native Americans of Alabama and their nearby neighbors. Focuses on describing and explaining lifeways of indigenous peoples using ethnographic, ethnohistoric, and archaeological studies.

ANT
150
Hours
3
Evolution for Everyone

This course is designed to open students minds to what evolution is and how it applies to all life. Toward that end, we will view lectures given by evolutionary scholars from varied institutions and disciplines.

ANT
208
Hours
3
Anthropology of Sex

This course is an introduction to human sexuality from a biocultural perspective with emphases on sexual diversity and pluralism and psychosexual evolution. It traces the evolution of human sociosexual behavior, including human sexual physiology, preproductive strategies; contemporary courtship, mating and marital patterns; gender differences in the brain and behavior; and sexual and social emotions. It compares the sexuality of humans to non-humans, especially to that of other primates. It also discusses human sexuality from the perspective of different cultures throughout the world. Among other topics, the course will address the psychobiocultural dimensions and implications of attraction, fidelity sex techniques, gender, incest, homosexuality and transexuality and sexually transmitted diseases.

ANT
210
SB
Hours
3
Language And Culture

Human activity in its linguistic, cultural, and social contexts; interrelationships between culture and natural language; and the influences of language and culture on thought and behavior.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
ANT
215
Hours
3
Anthropology in Movies and Fiction

Compares portrayals of anthropologists and core anthropological issues in movies and fiction to anthropological perspectives and scholarship.

ANT
216
Hours
3
Ethnographic Cinema

This course is a survey of the history of ethnographic cinema. Students in this class will learn this history by viewing important ethnographic films and by discussing and critiquing the visual representation of culture and society in anthropology.

ANT
250
Hours
3
Issues in Anthropology

This course is a flexible listing designed to cover specific topics in anthropology not already offered through an existing course. It is similar to ANT 450 Problems in Anthropology, but allows students with less exposure to ANT or the particular issues addressed an opportunity to learn more at a more introductory level.

ANT
269
Hours
6-12
Field Archaeology

In this course students and the supervising archaeologists work together as a research team on an archaeological excavation. Students learn basic excavation techniques and skills: how to identify, map, measure, recover, record, and process archaeological data. At the conclusion of the course, students will have excavation experience and insights into the archaeological research process.

ANT
270
Hours
0-3
Introduction to Biological Anthropology

An introduction to human evolution, biological variation, and adaptation, from the deep past to the present, with a special focus on the biocultural foundations of human nature. Students will become familiar with cutting edge evidence from the fossil record and molecular biology about our origins and prehistory, and how humans today respond to our widely varying physical and social environments.

ANT
275
Hours
3
Race, Ethnicity Human, and Variation

Historical and contemporary perspectives on human biological diversity, including the concepts of race, ethnicity, adaptation, and some of the social implications of these views.

ANT
311
Hours
3
Population, Health & Human Origin

Focuses on the relationships among human ecology, population growth, health and disease, and adaptation in modern and prehistoric societies. Explores the origins of infectious diseases, emphasizing the principles of epidemiology and evolution of pathogens.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 270
ANT
312
Hours
3
Non-Human Primates

This course is an introductory survey of the world's living non-human primates. The focus is on the taxonomy, anatomy, behavior, ecology and cognition of our closest living relatives. It is intended both as a starting point for further coursework in primate behavior and as a survey course for non-science students.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 270 or permission of the instructor.
ANT
317
Hours
3
Anth-Modern Life

Application of anthropological theories and findings to selected issues and problems of living in complex industrialized societies. Offered according to demand.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 102
ANT
318
Hours
3
Ancient Cities & Empires

A comparative study of ancient cities and empires with examples from the Old and New Worlds.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 103 or ANT 107
ANT
319
W
Hours
3
Ancient New World Civilization

An introduction to the ancient civilizations of Mesoamerica and South America. Explores the development of economic and political institutions as well as hieroglyphic texts, art styles, and religious rites.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 107 or permission of the instructor.
Writing
ANT
368
Hours
3
Southeastern Archaeology

Origin and development of pre-Columbian and early historic cultures of the Southeast. Offered according to demand.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 107
ANT
401
Hours
3
Theory and Method in Linguistic Anthropology

Scientific study of natural language, phonology, grammar, lexicon, meaning and the role of linguistics in anthropological research.

ANT
402
W
Hours
3
Gender Ethnicity & Health

Explores the gendered, ethnic, cultural, and class dimensions that underlie the patterning of disease and illness worldwide, with attention to the long-term health effects of racism, sexism and poverty. Topics include reproductive and sexual health, obesity, body image, HIV/AIDS, mental illness, homelessness, and more.

Prerequisite(s): Either ANT 100 or ANT 102 & 3 additional hours, or consent of instructor.
Writing
ANT
403
Hours
3
Anthropology is Elemental: Teaching Anthropology in Primary and Secondary Settings

This course is an introduction to teaching anthropology at the primary and secondary levels. It is a service-learning course, which means that all students will serve as instructors in a local anthropology course offered in the Tuscaloosa area. This course will expose students to applied anthropology through teaching the anthropological perspective via an activity-based four-subfield curriculum in conjunction with local elementary schools, after-school programs, or similar community partners. These programs will be taught by teams, and each student will be responsible for attending weekly course meetings, developing curricular material and implementing it in a classroom setting, and co-teaching with other students.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 102, ANT 107, ANT 210 and ANT 270
ANT
405
W
Hours
3
Culture, Mind, and Behavior

An examination of how culture influences individual thought, emotion, and behavior, and how culture is shaped by individual psychology. Topics include: models of culture; culture and visual perception; culture and personality; culture and mental health; as well as other topics.

Writing
ANT
408
Hours
3
Ancient Mexican Civilization

Survey of the origins and development of ancient civilizations in Mexico.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 107
ANT
409
Hours
3
Ancient Maya Civilization

Ancient Maya civilizations in Mexico and Central America from the earliest inhabitants until the Spanish Conquest.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 107
ANT
410
Hours
3
Ethnography of Communication

Students in this course will learn to use the concepts and methods of ethnography of communication by developing and carrying out a research project on language and social interaction. You will learn how social interaction is organized, how to document and study it, and how to address such evidence to to anthropological and applied problems. For undergraduates, the goal for the course will be for each student to produce a report based on their research and for the work to be of sufficient substance, quality, and intellectual and/or applied significance, that it would be an ideal submission for the UA Undergraduate Research & Creativity Conference in the following semester. Graduate students will produce a research report worthy of submission to a research conference of their professional scholarly organization. All students will finish the course with a critical and sophisticated understanding of how social interaction works in a variety of contexts.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 401 or ANT 210 or permission from instructor
ANT
411
W
Hours
3
Culture, Health, & Healing

A cross-cultural overview of medical systems, and the health, illness, and healing experiences within them. Patients and healers will be studied through the lens of etiology, help seeking, diagnosis and treatment. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): Either ANT 100 or ANT 102 & 3 additional hours, or consent of instructor.
Writing
ANT
412
W
Hours
3
Peoples Of Europe

A review of selected aspects of the customs, social systems, and cultures of European societies. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
ANT
413
W
Hours
3
Peoples Of Latin Amer

A review of selected aspects of Latin American social systems and cultures. Topics include social structure, ethnicity, economics, material culture, gender roles, religion, sports, and political systems. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): Either ANT 100 or ANT 102 & 3 additional hours, or consent of instructor.
Writing
ANT
417
Hours
3
Peoples Of Asia

A review of selected aspects of the customs, social systems, and cultures of South Asian societies.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 102
ANT
418
Hours
3
Dev Non-West Cultures

Theoretical and descriptive study of social change and development in non-Western societies. Major emphasis is placed on the effects of change on indigenous institutions. Both ethnographic and theoretical literature are examined.

ANT
419
W
Hours
3
Myth, Ritual, And Magic

Survey of the anthropological literature on religion, including such topics as myth, ritual, magic, witchcraft, totemism, shamanism, and trance states. Offered according to demand. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 102 or REL 100
Writing
ANT
421
Hours
3
Ethnography

Students work with University Libraries to develop research to address changes in information technology and the impact of such changes for UA students. Emphasizes the research design process as practiced by professional, applied anthropologists, including communicating roles and expectations with client stakeholders, developing testable hypotheses, operationalizing variables, and determining project scope, timeline, and budget.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hrs of Anthropology or permission from instructor
ANT
424
Hours
3
Cultural Resource Management

This course is an overview of Cultural Resource Management archaeology, including the historical background and development of the field, the legal and regulatory framework to CRM archaeology, the methodologies and techniques employed, and how the legislative requirements are implemented at the federal, state, and local levels. Students will learn how to craft and submit proposals, develop and manage budgets, design and implement fieldwork, conduct and supervise data analysis, and how to author and submit reports. Upon completion of this course, students will be prepared for entering a career in CRM archaeology.

ANT
426
Hours
3
Archaeology of East North America

Examination of the origins and developments of pre-Columbian and early historic cultures of eastern North America.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 107
ANT
428
Hours
3
North American Archaeology

This course is an introduction to the archaeology of North America, from initial colonization of the continent by hunter-gatherers, to the arrival of European explorers. We begin with an examination of the theories and debates concerning the arrival of humans in the New World. The remaining majority of the course will be an in-depth examination of prehistoric archaeological developments in the major culture areas of North America.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 107 and 6 hrs of additional anthropology classes or permission of the instructor.
ANT
431
Hours
1-3
Readings In Anth

Honors readings for seniors and graduate students. Offered with permission of instructor only. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.

ANT
432
Hours
1-3
Readings In Anthropology

Honors readings for seniors and graduate students. Offered with permission of instructor only. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.

ANT
436
Hours
3
Social Structure

Social organization and structure, social life and institutions (especially in non-literate societies), kinship, descent groups, marriage, residence, and local group composition. Offered every third semester.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 or ANT 102
ANT
438
Hours
3
Anthropology of Art

The course views the art that societies past and present produce; it explores culture, creativity, and human beings' distinctive compulsion to make decorative objects.

Prerequisite(s): At least 6 hours of ANT courses, including ANT 102; OR permission of instructor
ANT
439
Hours
3
Topics Anthropology Religion

An examination of contemporary issues and topics in the anthropology of religion.

ANT
440
W
Hours
3
Culture

A selective review of past and contemporary concepts, theories, and methodological approaches adopted by cultural anthropologists. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
ANT
441
Hours
3
Documenting Justice I

Interdisciplinary course in ethnographic filmmaking, focusing particularly on analyzing the many dimensions of culture and social experience. Students produce a short documentary film on a story of justice or injustice in Alabama. Application and permission of instructor required.

ANT
442
Hours
3
Documenting Justice II

Continuation of ANT 441.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 441
ANT
444
W
Hours
3
Anthropology And Cemeteries

Using approaches developed in the discipline of anthropology and, more particularly, in the subfield of archaeology, an exploration of the different ways in which local cemeteries can yield information on cultural, societal, and historical matters. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
ANT
445
Hours
3
Historical Archaeology

This course is a survey of the method and theory of the discipline of historical archaeology. Focusing particularly on the historical archaeology of North America, this course reviews the development of the field, considers the related fields of colonial archaeology and the archaeology of the contemporary, and examines what distinguishes historical archaeology within the broader discipline.

ANT
450
Hours
3
Probs In Anthropology

Devoted to issues not covered in other courses. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.

ANT
451
Hours
1-6
Undergraduate Research

Introduction to independent anthropological research with a focus on constructing testable hypotheses, selecting variables, measuring attributes, recording data, making interpretations and writing and presenting results.

ANT
460
W
Hours
3
Anthropology and Museums

Examines the historical connections between anthropology and natural history museums in the United States. Explores the present operation of such museums and develops exhibits based on collection studies.

Writing
ANT
462
Hours
3
Ancient Andean Civilizations

This course examines the cultures of the Andes in South America. It focuses on the rise of civilizations, cities, and empires in the Andes. The course also investigates the emergence, growth, and conquest of the largest indigenous empire in the Americas through a critical reading of archaeological, ethnohistorical, and popular accounts of the Inkas.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 103 or ANT 107
ANT
465
Hours
3
Lithic Analysis

Introduction to the basics of analysis of stone tools, their manufacture, and their use by means of microscopic and macroscopic approaches.

ANT
466
Hours
3
Laboratory Methods Archaeology

This class is a “hands-on” course in archaeological laboratory methods and most useful for anthropology majors/minors. Students will read about different kinds of analyses, and then put theory into practice by classifying and analyzing prehistoric artifacts. Students will learn how to build interpretations of the past by using artifact assemblages, how to discriminate between reliable and less reliable information, and collaborate in group activities.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 103 or ANT 107
ANT
467
Hours
3
Methods Prehistoric Iconography

An exploration of the concepts and methods used by prehistoric archaeologists to impute meanings in representational art.

ANT
468
Hours
3
Ceramics for the Archaeologist

Ceramics are the most ubiquitous and variable materials on many archaeological sites and, as such, they offer archaeologists a vast amount of information about the past. In this class, we approach ceramics from the perspective of research questions, and investigate how analytical techniques can help address them. The class also has a large practical component. Students will conduct analyses on collections and present their findings at the end of the class. This course is meant to provide a framework for developing hypotheses, methods and skills directly applicable to senior projects, MA theses, and Ph.D. dissertations.

Prerequisite(s): This is a course about archaeological research, therefore, it is restricted to undergraduates that have ceramic collections that they want to study as part of a senior or honor thesis. Undergraduate prerequisites for this course include 1) permission of the instructor, 2)12 hours in anthropology, and 3) ANT 107 "Introduction to Archaeology
ANT
471
Hours
3
Fossil Humans and Evolution

Survey of the discoveries, methods, and theories that provide the background for modern research in macroevolution. Offered according to demand.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 270
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: banner sync
ANT
473
Hours
4
Human Osteology

Detailed introduction to human osteology emphasizing the identification of fragmentary remains and the criteria for determination of age, sex, and race. Two hours- lecture, two hours- laboratory. Offered according to demand.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 270, and a "C" average.
ANT
474
Hours
3
Neuroanthropology

This course provides an introduction to evolutionary and biocultural approaches within anthropology to the central and peripheral nervous systems and their interconnections. Topics include the evolution of the brain; how culture and social structure shape the brain, its development, and its activity; and anthropological perspectives on connections among culture, behavior, brain, mind, and body.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 270 or BSC 300 or PY 413
ANT
475
W
Hours
3
Biology, Culture, & Evolution

An introduction to the biocultural and evolutionary bases of human adaptability. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 270
Writing
ANT
476
W
Hours
3
Nutritional Anthropology

Introduction to anthropological inquiries in nutrition (including food habits, food systems, and dietary variability) from a cross-cultural perspective. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
ANT
478
Hours
3
Anthro of Human Development

Health culturally competent socialized adults and mature physical forms arise from a developmental process with evolutionary, biological, social and cultural dimensions. We survey child/human development from an anthropological perspective, considering interactons across levels of analysis from genes to culture.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 100 OR ANT 270
ANT
479
Hours
3
Human Paleopathology

Course investigates skeletal pathology and trauma. Topics included: 1. Understanding disease processes, 2. Distinguishing accidental and violent trauma on bone, 3. Recognizing the following conditions in skeletal remains: congential anomalies, circulatory disorders, joint diseases, infectious diseases, metabolic diseases, skeletal dysplasias, neoplastic conditions, diseases of the dentition and other conditions. Students will inventory, evaluate and analyze sets of human skeletal remains for pathology and trauma and complete final reports on those remains.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 270
ANT
480
Hours
3
Advanced Evolutionary Studies & Big Questions

This course is the capstone to the Evolutionary Studies minor and should be taken in the final semester of the program. This course meets in conjunction with "Evolution for Everyone," the minor introductory course to the minor, to revisit the basic principles and application of evolutionary theory. These courses are team-taught by faculty from around the University and integrate the Alabama Lectures of Life's Evolution series, so they are likely to be different for you in both iterations. The course will review applications of evolutionary theory in the natural, social, and applied sciences and in the humanities. Additionally, you will conduct or complete a culminating project during the first half of the semester. During the second half of the semester, you will present this to the class and submit an article based on your project for publication in a peer-reviewed science journal.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 150; BSC 220; & ANT 270, PHL 380 OR GEO 102
ARB
101
FL
Hours
4
Elementary Arabic

Students will learn the spoken and written language of Modern Standard Arabic. This course is intended for students with NO PRIOR KNOWLEDGE of Arabic. Native speakers or near native speakers of the language are NOT allowed to enroll. Any students with background knowledge of this language must see the program director BEFORE enrolling.

Foreign Language
ARB
102
FL
Hours
4
Elementary Arabic

Course is a continuation of ARB 101. Students will learn the spoken and written language. Native speakers or near native speakers of the language are NOT allowed to enroll.

Prerequisite(s): ARB 101
Foreign Language
ARB
201
Hours
3
Intermediate Arabic

Continuation of Arabic language on the intermediate level. Students who already have basics of Arabic speaking, writing and reading will develop their skills further. The class meets three hours per week. Native speakers or near native speakers of the language are NOT allowed to enroll.

Prerequisite(s): ARB 102
ARB
202
Hours
3
Intermediate Arabic

Continuation of ARB 201. Emphasis is on the development of reading skills and writing proficiency. Not repeatable without the permission of the CLC director. Native speakers or near native speakers of the language are NOT allowed to enroll.

Prerequisite(s): ARB 201
ARB
260
Hours
3
The Arabian Nights

This course introduces students to the Arabian Nights (One Thousand and One Nights) in translation. The Arabian Nights are a collection of stories framed in one story narrated by Shahrazad. The narratives are a mixed potion of magic, love, fear, and death. This course will discuss the history of the tales as well as the different translations, in addition to the socio-cultural concepts of antagonists and protagonist forces, such as magic spells and the Jinni. The students will cover a variety of tales: Sinbad, Ali Baba, and Aladdin. The course will also examine the Islamic context in the Arabian Nights. Taught in English.

Prerequisite(s): None
ARB
301
Hours
3
Third-year Arabic

Study of contemporary Arabic language and culture. This course is intended for students who have already taken ARB 202. Native speakers or near native speakers of the language are NOT allowed to enroll. This course will emphasize the development of practical communicative ability in Arabic along with cultural knowledge of Arabic speaking countries.

Prerequisite(s): ARB 202
ARH
151
FA
Hours
3
Intro To Visual Arts

Not applicable to the studio or art history majors or minors. Introduction to the appreciation of art through an examination of the nature, themes, and purposes of art, the exploration of visual arts media and methods; and a survey of art history and artistic masterpieces.

Fine Arts
ARH
252
FA
Hours
3
Survey Of Art I

Survey of major examples of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the prehistoric through the medieval periods.

Fine Arts
ARH
253
FA
Hours
3
Survey Of Art II

Survey of major examples of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Renaissance through the modern periods.

Fine Arts
ARH
254
FA
Hours
3
Survey Of Art III

Survey of major examples of painting, sculpture, and the applied arts of India, China, Korea, Japan, and Southeast Asia.

Fine Arts
ARH
291
Hours
3
Special Projects

This number is used for special projects determined by the instructor or for independent research projects proposed by students. In the latter case, the project must be approved by a sponsoring faculty member and the department chairperson. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.

ARH
351
Hours
3
Ancient Art

A survey of the contributions of Egypt, Greece, and Rome to the development of Western architecture, sculpture, and painting.

ARH
352
Hours
3
Early Christian Byzantine Art

This course focuses on major monuments of painting, sculpture, and architecture, as well as wider visual culture, produced in the Early Christian West and the Byzantine Empire 312-1453 CE. Attention will be paid to major styles/developments with reference to relevant social, political, religious, historical and technical issues.

Prerequisite(s): 6 hours of 200 level Art History courses or permission of the instructor.
ARH
355
W
Hours
3
Chinese Painting

Survey of Chinese pictorial art from the Bronze Age to the present day. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
ARH
356
W
Hours
3
Japanese Painting & Prints

Survey of painting and woodblock prints of Japan. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
ARH
358
Hours
3
Islamic Art and Architecture

A survey of the material and artistic products of the Islamic world, from the seventh to seventeenth centuries.

Prerequisite(s): 6 hours of 200 level Art History courses or permission of the instructor.
ARH
360
Hours
3
Early Medieval Art

This course focuses on major monuments of painting, sculpture, and architecture, as well as wider visual culture, produced in Western Europe between 500-1150 CE. Beginning with backward glances at Roman traditions, special attention is focused on works of art representative of major styles/developments during the focus period with reference to relevant social, political, religious, historical and technical issues.

Prerequisite(s): 6 hours of 200 level Art History courses or permission of the instructor.
ARH
361
W
Hours
3
Late Medieval Art

This course examines the wealth of visual and material cultures of Europe and the broader Mediterranean from roughly 1200-1450. Materials considered will include sculpture, architecture, painting and manuscripts, as well as metal work and enamels, ivories, textiles, and portable objects from both European and non-Western cultures. Objects and monuments will be explored within their relevant social, political, religious, cultural and historical contexts.

Prerequisite(s): 6 hours of 200 level Art History courses or permission of the instructor.
Writing
ARH
362
Hours
3
Medieval Art

This course examines the wealth of visual and material cultures of Europe and the broader Mediterranean from roughly 1000-1250. Materials considered will include sculpture, architecture, painting and manuscripts, as well as metal work and enamels, ivories, textiles, and portable objects from both European and non-Western cultures. Various course themes may include the natures of religious and devotional art; the intersections between faith and power; the influence of non-Western societies and artworks on Western medieval culture; and the various roles of art in medieval societies. Objects and monuments will be explored within their relevant social, political, religious, cultural and historical contexts.

Prerequisite(s): 6 hours of 200 level Art History courses or permission of the instructor
ARH
363
Hours
3
Masterpieces Of Spanish Art

Selected monuments of peninsular Spanish art from the prehistoric period to the contemporary period.

ARH
364
Hours
3
Renaissance Art

Survey of 15th- and 16th-century painting, sculpture, and architecture in Europe.

ARH
365
Hours
3
Northern Renaissance Art

This course provides students with a survey of painting, sculpture and architecture produced in Northern Europe (France, Flanders, Germany, England) between 1350 and 1600, concentrating on knowledge of major monuments and artists. Beginning with backward glances at the fourteenth century, attention will be focused on developments and major themes important to study of the period (including relations between North and South, the status of the artist, and the impact of religious change on works of art), thus encouraging students to have a long-range view of the traditions behind the focus works.

Prerequisite(s): 6 hours of 200 level Art History courses or permission of the instructor
ARH
367
Hours
3
Art Patronage Florence

Survey of the art of Florence emphasizing the artists and the patrons, such as the religious orders, guilds, and private families who created the Renaissance style in painting, sculpture, and architecture.

ARH
368
Hours
3
Early Renaissance Art

This course provides students with a survey of painting, sculpture and architecture during the early Italian Renaissance in major city centers, concentrating on knowledge of major monuments and artists. Attention will be focused on fourteenth-century traditions, fifteenth-century developments, and major themes important to study of the period (technical innovations, the inheritance and influence of antiquity, the status of the artist, religious and political symbolism, the requirements of patrons and the market, and the impact of social conditions and historical events).

Prerequisite(s): 6 hours of 200 level Art History courses or permission of the instructor.
ARH
369
Hours
3
Later Italian Renaissance Art

This course provides students with a survey of painting, sculpture and architecture in the later Italian Renaissance (c. 1480-1580) in major city centers, concentrating on knowledge of major monuments and artists. Beginning with backward glances at the fifteenth century, attention will be focused on sixteenth-century developments and major themes important to study of the period (including Mannerism, the status of the artist, and the impact of religious change on works of art), thus encouraging students to have a long-range view of the traditions behind the focus works.

Prerequisite(s): 6 hours of 200 level Art History courses or permission of the instructor.
ARH
371
W
Hours
3
Baroque Art South Europe

This course provides a survey of Southern Baroque painting, architecture, and sculpture, focusing primarily on Italian and Spanish art produced between 1600-1700. A variety of genres are addressed including Christian and mythological works, portraiture, still-life, and landscape. Issues considered include the impact of the Counter Reformation on artistic production; patronage; gender; classicism and naturalism; and the status of artists. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): 6 hours of 200 level Art History courses or permission of the instructor
Writing
ARH
373
Hours
3
Baroque Art North Europe

Survey of the art of 17th-century Belgium, Holland, and France.

Prerequisite(s): 6 Hours of 200 Level Art History Classes
ARH
374
Hours
3
Art of the American South

Painting, sculpture, and decorative arts from the colonial period to the twentieth century.

Prerequisite(s): 6 hours of 200 level Art History courses or permission of the instructor.
ARH
375
Hours
3
Nineteenth Century Art

Painting and sculpture from the Neoclassical through the Post-Impressionist periods.

ARH
376
Hours
3
American Architecture

American architecture from the colonial period to the 20th century.

ARH
377
W
Hours
3
American Art before 1815

A study of American Art and visual and material culture before 1815. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
ARH
378
W
Hours
3
Art of the African Diaspora

This course examines the artistic, material, and visual cultures of the African diaspora. Various geographic regions and historical periods will be covered. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): 6 hours of 200 level Art History courses or permission of the instructor.
Writing
ARH
380
Hours
3
American Art: 1880-1945

A study of American Art and visual and material culture from the 1880 to 1945.

Prerequisite(s): 6 Hours of ARH 200 level courses or by permission of the instructor
ARH
381
Hours
3
Art Since World War II

Modernist and postmodernist art and architecture from the mid-20th century to the present.

Prerequisite(s): 6 hours of 200 level Art History courses.
ARH
385
Hours
3
Early 20th Century Art

Painting and sculpture from Impressionism to World War II.

Prerequisite(s): 6 hours of 200 level Art History courses.
ARH
388
Hours
3
African American Art

African American art from the colonial era to the 20th century.

Prerequisite(s): 6 hours of 200 level Art History courses or permission of the instructor.
ARH
400
W
Hours
3
Photographic Discourse

Study of the history of photography, with a particular emphasis on photographic culture and reproduction. Writing proficiency (within this discipline) is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): 6 hours of 200-level and 3 hours of 300-level Art History courses. Total 9 hours Art History required.
Writing
ARH
402
Hours
3
Paul R. Jones Collection of American Art K-12 Program

This program is designed to offer graduate and undergraduate students the opportunity to conduct interdisciplinary community engagement activities via with the College of Arts and Sciences’s Paul R. Jones Collection of American Art (PRJCAA). Central to this course is student use of the PRJCAA to engage K-12 pupils and their teachers in the Tuscaloosa area. Students will learn about the PRJCAA including its content, mission, and goals. They will also begin investigating foundational readings in community engagement scholarship. To join this class, students must complete an application and interview process. This course does not meet at regularly scheduled class times during the day and much of course itself is conducted off-site at a school within the Tuscaloosa City School system. Students must undergo a mandatory (state required) background check before starting the program.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Instructor
ARH
455
Hours
3
Topics In Asian Art

Selected topics in the art of China and Japan.

ARH
456
Hours
3
The Arts Of Buddhism

Major movements and styles inherent in the artistic products of India, China, Japan, Southeast Asia, Tibet, and Nepal.

Prerequisite(s): 6 hours of 200 level Art History courses or permission of the instructor.
ARH
461
Hours
3
Topics in Medieval Art

Selected topics in the art and architecture of the Middle Ages.

Prerequisite(s): 6 hours of 200 level Art History courses or permission of the instructor.
ARH
467
Hours
3
Topics Renaissance and Baroque Art

Study of selected themes in Renaissance or Baroque art. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours.

Prerequisite(s): 9 hours of 200- or 300-level art history courses or permission of the instructor.
ARH
477
Hours
3
Topics in American Art

Study of a selected theme in American art or architecture. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours.

Prerequisite(s): ARH 376 or 377 AND 9 additional hours of 200- and 300-level art history courses OR permission of the instructor.
ARH
481
Hours
3
Topics 20th Century Art

Study of selected themes in modern and contemporary art. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.

ARH
488
Hours
3
Topics in African American Art

Study of selected topics or themes in African American Art. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours.

Prerequisite(s): 9 hours of 200 and 300 level Art History courses or permission of the instructor.
ARH
490
W
Hours
3
Theories and Methods of Art History

This seminar examines the disciplinary foundations, historiography, and major issues of art history and explores the various methodological approaches used in the field. It investigates the ways in which the methods and theories of art history contribute to our understanding of history, aesthetics, and social practices through art objects. Students will explore the methodologies employed by art historians and evaluate – as scholars, readers, and writers – complex issues and a range of scholarship. Class time will center on verbal communications, including student-led discussions of assigned readings and oral presentations. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): 15 hours of ARH courses or permission of the instructor
Writing
ARH
491
Hours
3
Independent Studies

This number is used for special projects determined by the instructor or for independent research projects proposed by students. In the latter case, the project must be approved by a sponsoring faculty member and the department chairperson. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.

ART
110
Hours
3
Drawing I

Basic studio course concerned with comprehension of visual concepts and development of skills through exposure to drawing media.

ART
130
Hours
3
2D Design

Introductory course that explores two-dimensional concepts in a variety of processes and media.

ART
131
Hours
3
3D Design

Introductory course that explores three-dimensional concepts in a variety of processes and media.

ART
208
Hours
3
Special Projects

Topics not taught in the regular curriculum. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours.

ART
210
Hours
3
Drawing II

Continuation of Drawing I with emphasis on creative development of visual ideas using traditional and experimental techniques and media.

Prerequisite(s): ART 110
ART
212
Hours
3
Ceramics

Completion of ART 110, ART 130, and ART 131 is recommended before taking this course. Exploration of ceramics media and processes with emphasis on the development of individual concepts.

ART
216
Hours
3
Painting

An introductory course designed to strengthen the individual student's awareness of the history and techniques of the craft of painting while exposing the student to contemporary styles and ideas of painting.

Prerequisite(s): ART 110 or ART 130
ART
218
Hours
3
Photography

Study of photography and photographic processes employed as creative media. Basic black-and-white processing and printing.

Prerequisite(s): ART 110 or ART 130
ART
220
Hours
3
Printmaking

Survey of printmaking processes including intaglio, relief, screen print, and lithography.

Prerequisite(s): ART 110 or ART 130
ART
222
Hours
3
Sculpture

Introduction to basic sculptural skills - including plaster, wood, aluminum casting, direct construction, and various mixed materials and techniques - with emphasis on craftsmanship, content, and idea development.

Prerequisite(s): ART 131 OR permission from the instructor
ART
224
Hours
3
Introduction To Digital Art I

An introduction to computer-based art making, digital literacy, image processing, and digital printing.

Prerequisite(s): ART 110 or ART 130
ART
251
FA, HU
Hours
3
Reboot/Remix

This course examines contemporary art through its relationship to three familiar popular culture phenomena: gaming and simulated environments; popular music; graphic novels and comics.

Fine Arts, Humanities
ART
302
Hours
3
Color Theory & Application

Course focuses on both analytical and intuitive understanding and application of color.

Prerequisite(s): ART 110 or ART 130
ART
305
Hours
3
Aqueous Media

Course focuses on contemporary styles, concepts, and ideas regarding the use of wet media.

Prerequisite(s): ART 210 or ART 216 or ART 220
ART
309
W
Hours
3
Navigating The Art World

The theory and history of the art institutions that shape artists' careers and practical strategies for sustainable creative opportunities beyond the degree. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): ART 110 and ART 210 and ART 130 and ART 131 Plus any two from the following list: ART 212 or ART 216 or ART 218 or ART 220 or ART 222 or ART 224 C- or higher required
Writing
ART
310
Hours
3
Life Drawing

Individual exploration of figurative forms in a variety of drawing media and processes.

Prerequisite(s): ART 110, ART 130, and ART 210 or permission of the instructor.
ART
311
Hours
3
Figurative Modeling

Course offers students a chance to explore figurative ceramic modeling and sculpting as it relates to representing a likeness.

ART
312
Hours
3
Ceramics

Emphasis is on individual approaches to media, methods, and activities.

Prerequisite(s): ART 212
ART
313
Hours
3
Ceramics

Emphasis is on individual approaches to media, methods, and activities.

Prerequisite(s): ART 312
ART
314
Hours
3
Typography

Further development of design methods and processes including typography, image processing, visual communication, and digital design production.

Prerequisite(s): ART 214 or ART 224
ART
315
Hours
3
Digital Layout and Production

Further development of design methods and processes including grids, page layout, visual communication, and digital design production.

Prerequisite(s): ART 214 or ART 224
ART
316
Hours
3
Painting Composition

The applied study of pictorial manipulation through color and design principles.

Prerequisite(s): ART 216
ART
317
Hours
3
Painting Concepts

A course designed to increase understanding of subject, meaning and context with the objective of making the transition between guided assignments and personal pursuits.

Prerequisite(s): ART 305 or 316, or by permission of the instructor.
ART
318
Hours
3
Photography

Emphasis is on individual approaches to media, methods, and activities.

Prerequisite(s): ART 218
ART
319
Hours
3
Photography

Emphasis is on individual approaches to media, methods, and activities.

Prerequisite(s): ART 318
ART
320
Hours
3
Printmaking: Intaglio & Relief

Further exploration of intaglio and relief processes, including a review of basic techniques, grounds, printing in color, printing multiple plates or blocks, and medium/large format printing. Assignments emphasize both technical and conceptual development.

Prerequisite(s): ART 220 or ART 210 or permission of the instructor
ART
321
Hours
3
Printmaking: Lithography

This course explores traditional and experimental approaches to stone and plate lithography. Students will make a series of lithographs using a variety of approaches, matrices, and drawing materials. Assignments emphasize both technical and conceptual development.

Prerequisite(s): ART 220 or ART 210 or permission of the instructor
ART
322
Hours
3
Sculpture

Introduction to advanced sculptural thinking and problem solving with assignments geared toward the development of skills and abilities in working with a range of materials and techniques such as metal casting, fabrication, rubber, leather, wood, and stone fabrication.

Prerequisite(s): ART 222
ART
323
Hours
3
Sculpture

Continued development of 3-D thinking and technical skills through assignments addressing a variety of materials and processes, including physics in three dimensions, the illustration of intangible thoughts with physical objects, the relevance of self to sculpture, and an examination of personal aesthetic.

Prerequisite(s): ART 131 and ART 222 and ART 322
ART
324
Hours
3
Intermediate Digital Art

Projects allow for individual approaches and further development of digital art methods and processes.

Prerequisite(s): ART 224
ART
325
Hours
3
Printmaking: Monoprint/Monotype

This course examines printmaking through the lens of painting, including the vocabulary, materials, and techniques of painting with acrylics or oils. Students will use drawing and brushwork techniques to establish images on a variety of printable matrices, using a variety of printmaking processes. Assignments emphasize experimentation, collaboration, and exploring the creative process.

Prerequisite(s): ART 220 or ART 216 or permission of the instructor
ART
326
Hours
3
Digital Art: The Narrative

Students will explore contemporary structure of narrative (and conversely the non-narrative) by creating, producing, and sharing stories using computer-based tools.

Prerequisite(s): ART 224
ART
328
Hours
3
Digital Phototography

This course will cover all aspects of digital photography from picture-making to output. There will be a survey of contemporary photo / digital artists to stimulate ideas, discussion and practice across numerous conceptual themes. Students will learn best practices for building and managing files that will drive top-quality output. All elements of traditional (scanning) and RAW workflow will be considered from acquisition through editing and output. Aesthetically, these skills will be put into practice in through the creation of refined and realized artworks. There will be critiques to facilitate the creative process. The semester will culminate in the production of a final portfolio.

Prerequisite(s): ART 218 or ART 224
ART
329
Hours
3
Printmaking: Photo-based Processes

This course examines printmaking through the lens of photography, including the vocabulary, materials, and techniques of the analog and digital photograph. Students will create work using a variety of light sensitive printmaking processes. Assignments emphasize both technical and conceptual development.

Prerequisite(s): ART 220 or ART 218 or ART 224 or permission of the instructor
ART
338
Hours
3
Photographic Studio Lighting

The course will present essential skills in photographic studio lighting. Both natural and artificial light sources will be explored for producing aesthetically and conceptually engaging artworks. A wide range of applications will be explored including still life, portraiture, classic lighting problems, and open creative projects. Experimentation and improvisation is highly encouraged. Topics will reference both historical precedents and contemporary practices. The course will culminate with a portfolio of work.

Prerequisite(s): ART 218 or ART 328 or permission of the instructor.
ART
344
Hours
3
Concepts in Drawing

This course covers drawing at the intermediate level, including media, form, content, and theory. This course emphasizes personal direction. This course is designed to encourage student investigation into experimental drawing and contemporary art practices. All topics will be devoted to promoting individual student creativity, mastery of drawing means and techniques, and a further understanding of graphic concerns.

Prerequisite(s): ART 110, and ART 210 OR by permission of the instructor.
ART
380
Hours
3
Art Museum Practices

An overview of art museum practices. Students acquire informed perspectives on the general operations, strategies, policies, and practices inherent in a small art museum.

ART
406
Hours
3
Independent Studies

Students may make proposals for projects not taught in the regular curriculum. Proposals must be approved by a sponsoring faculty member and the department chairperson.

ART
408
Hours
3-6
Special Projects

This course is designed to focus on a variety of topics in Studio Art that are not regularly offered within the Studio Arts curriculum. Topics will vary on media chosen form ceramics, digital media, drawing, painting, photography, printmaking, and sculpture. The course can be taken for a maximum of 6 hours.

ART
410
Hours
3
Drawing Seminar

Self-directed studio practice overseen by the instructor. The student works toward creating a consistent and conceptually sound body of work that investigates contemporary and traditional definitions of drawing.

Prerequisite(s): ART 110, ART 210, ART 310, ART 344, and ART 444 or by permission of the instructor.
ART
412
Hours
3-6
Ceramics

Directed studio practices overseen by the instructor and designed to enhance the student's understanding of advanced ceramics concepts and techniques.

Prerequisite(s): ART 212 and ART 312 and ART 313
ART
414
Hours
3-6
Graphic Design

Preparation of a graphic design portfolio. Enrollment for 4, 5, or 6 hours requires permission of the instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours.

Prerequisite(s): ART 314 or ART 315
ART
415
Hours
3
Graphic Design Practicum

Partnering agencies with design apprentices for hands-on training. Students are required to work no less than 10 hours per week.

Prerequisite(s): ART 414
ART
416
Hours
3-6
Advanced Painting Seminar

Self-directed studio practice overseen by the instructor. The student is expected to work toward creating a consistent and conceptually sound body of work. Enrollment for 4, 5, or 6 hours requires permission of the instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours.

Prerequisite(s): ART 317
ART
418
Hours
3
Advanced Photography

Emphasis on individual approaches to advanced photographic practice (analog or digital) resulting in a cohesive body of work suitable for exhibition. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours.

Prerequisite(s): ART 318 or ART 328 or permission of the instructor.
ART
420
Hours
3-6
Printmaking

Emphasis on individual approaches resulting in a cohesive body of work suitable for exhibition. Enrollment for 4, 5, or 6 hours requires permission of the instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours.

Prerequisite(s): ART 320 and ART 321
ART
422
Hours
3-6
Sculpture

Development of work and thought at an advanced level in preparation for completion of the BA or BFA degree. Graduating semester includes a BA or BFA thesis exhibition accompanied by a written thesis requirement.

Prerequisite(s): ART 222 and ART 322 and ART 323
ART
424
Hours
3
Digital Art Seminar

Special topics in digital media. Enrollment for 4, 5, or 6 hours requires permission of the instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours.

Prerequisite(s): ART 324 or ART 326
ART
428
Hours
3
Advanced Digital Photography

The course will expand upon digital skills for the photographer / digital artist presented in ART 328. This course presents technical, aesthetic and conceptual concerns at an advanced level. Content will be delivered through lecture, demonstrations, workshops, and experiential learning. The primary emphasis is on student-driven production of fully realized artworks. There will be regular critiques to facilitate the creative process. There will be a survey of contemporary photo / digital artists to stimulate ideas, discussion and practices across numerous conceptual themes. The semester will culminate in the production of a final portfolio and works presented for exhibition.

Prerequisite(s): ART 328
ART
444
Hours
3
Advanced Concepts in Drawing

This course covers drawing at the advanced level, including media, form, content, and theory. This course emphasizes personal direction. This course is designed to encourage student investigation into experimental drawing and contemporary art practices. All topics will be devoted to promoting individual student creativity, mastery of drawing means and techniques, and a further understanding of graphic concerns.

Prerequisite(s): ART 110, ART 210, ART 310, ART344 or by permission of the instructor.
ART
499
Hours
3,6
Senior Thesis

This course focuses on the development of an independent thesis project of a body of creative work in the area of the primary concentration and is restricted to BFA studio art majors with senior standing. The thesis must be publicly exhibited. The course can be taken for a maximum of 6 hours.

Prerequisite(s): Students must have permission from the Instructor and have completed a minimum of 60 hours in ART and/or ARH course work. Senior Thesis is designed to be taken during the final semester of study for the B.F.A. degree.
AS
100
Hours
0
EC Continuous Enrollment

Used as a course designation for all students enrolled in Early College.

AS
101
FCMP
Hours
1-2
Freshman Compass Course: Arts & Sciences

An orientation course designed to introduce students to the University and the College of Arts and Sciences and to assist in academic planning. Open to freshmen. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 hours. Pass/fail.

Freshman Compass
AS
102
FCMP
Hours
1
Compass: Arts & Sciences

A continuation of AS 101 for students in living-learning communities. Pass/fail.

Prerequisite(s): AS 101
Freshman Compass
AS
299
Hours
1
Junior Seminar

Seminar for premedical, prelaw, and undecided juniors and seniors.

AY
101
N
Hours
3
Intro To Astronomy

This course surveys the development of our current understanding of the Universe, including our Solar System, exoplanets, stars and stellar evolution (including white dwarfs, neutron stars, black holes, and supernovae), galaxies and cosmology (dark matter, dark energy, the Big Bang, the accelerating universe, supermassive black holes), and life in the Universe. NOTE: If the student plans to apply AY 101 toward satisfaction of the N requirement of the University Core Curriculum, AY 102 must also be taken.

Natural Science
AY
102
N
Hours
1
Intro Astronomy Lab

This laboratory course involves indoor hands-on activities interpreting stellar spectra, stellar luminosity-temperature diagrams, celestial spheres, and astronomical imagery of the Moon, stars (including the Sun), star clusters, nebulae, galaxies, and galaxy clusters. NOTE: If the student plans to apply AY 102 toward satisfaction of the N requirement of the University Core Curriculum, AY 101 must also be taken.

Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: AY 101
Natural Science
AY
155
Hours
3
Life in the Universe

This course is a survey of the new and rapidly-developing interdisciplinary science of astrobiology, accessible to the non-science major. Using the tools of astronomy, biology, geology, and chemistry, we will explore some of the biggest questions ever asked: How did life start on the Earth? Did life start elsewhere in our solar system, and elsewhere in our galaxy? Are we alone in the Universe? If there is life on other planets, how would we recognize it? Using the example of the history of life on Earth, we will explore locations in our solar system to gather evidence of whether life could have started, and could currently thrive in those locations. We will then broaden our scope to explore possibilities of life on planets orbiting other stars in our galaxy (and beyond) by summarizing what has been learned recently from surveys of planets orbiting other stars, in the Search for Extra Terrestrial Intelligence.

AY
203
N
Hours
2
Observational Astronomy

In this course students learn to observe and record images and spectra of planets, stars, nebulae, and galaxies using portable telescopes on campus, the 16-inch telescope of the campus observatory, telescopes located in the darker skies at Moundville, and observatory telescopes in Arizona and Chile by internet control. Both indoor exercises and observing projects are undertaken. Students should normally have completed AY101 or a more advanced astronomy course; people concurrently enrolled in AY101 or AY204 can be admitted with the permission of the instructor NOTE: If the student plans to apply AY 203 toward satisfaction of the N requirement of the University Core Curriculum, AY 204 or AY 206 must also be taken.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 113 or MATH 115 or MATH 125 or MATH 145
Natural Science
AY
204
N
Hours
3
Solar System Astronomy

This course provides (1) a discussion of orbital mechanics and of the interior structure, surface features, atmosphere, and origin of the sun, planets, and solar system; (2) an understanding of the detection techniques and current census of extrasolar planets; and (3) a discourse on the possibility of life on other planets. NOTE: If the student plans to apply AY 204 toward satisfaction of the N requirement of the University Core Curriculum, AY 203 must also be taken.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 113 or MATH 115 or MATH 125 or MATH 145
Natural Science
AY
206
N
Hours
3
Astron Beyond Solar Syst

This course: (1) connects the observed properties of stars (including our Sun) to their physical structure and evolution, up to their final endpoints as white dwarfs, neutron stars, or black holes; (2) surveys the properties of galaxies (including our Milky Way), their baryonic and dark matter content, their dynamics and evolution (star formation history, feedback, secular processes, mergers, growth of central supermassive black holes) and galaxy clustering; and (3) presents modern cosmology, including the Big Bang, the Cosmic Microwave Background, the accelerating expansion of the Universe, dark energy, inflation, and the formation of the lightest elements. NOTE: If the student plans to apply AY 206 toward satisfaction of the N requirement of the University Core Curriculum, AY 203 must also be taken.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 113 or MATH 115 or MATH 125 or MATH 145
Natural Science
AY
421
Hours
3
Theoretical Astrophysics

This course provides a broad introduction to the theoretical foundations of astrophysical phenomena, demonstrating how fundamental phenomenology arises from physical laws. Several broad domains of astrophysics are covered, including planetary and stellar orbits, radiation, radiative transfer, ionization, star and planet formation, stellar evolution, binary stars, special and general relativity (including black holes), galactic structure and dynamics (including dark matter), active galaxies, spacetime structure, formation of large scale matter structure, and cosmology (including the accelerating expansion of the Universe, dark energy, and Grand Unification of forces in the early Universe).

Prerequisite(s): PH 253
AY
433
W
Hours
3
Techniques of Observational Astronomy

Students will learn to perform astronomical observations with eye, telescope, and modern detectors, using techniques of digital imaging, photometry, and spectroscopy. Wavelength ranges from radio to gamma-ray will be addressed. Students will gain familiarity with current software tools for data analysis, model fitting, and error analysis. Students will carry out and report on all components of observational research, from concept and data collection to analysis and presentation of conclusions. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): AY 204 or AY 206 PH 253 or permission of instructor
Writing
AY
450
Hours
3
Stars & Stellar Evolution

This course is intended to facilitate a fairly complete understanding of stars, including their structure, evolution (formation, stages of burning, end states), synthesis of elements, and the physical processes involved in each of these, as well as introduce the modern computational modeling techniques used to apply stellar physics to stars. For astronomy students, this course will provide the background necessary to understand the underlying principles of stellar processes and modelling as they are used both in ongoing research into stellar physics and phenomena and in support of other areas of astronomical research where stellar populations, products and processes are important. In a broader context, relevant for any physics student, this course will discuss how understanding the physical principles in fluid dynamics, high-density materials, heat transfer, plasma physics, nuclear structure, and nuclear processes are assembled into our modern understanding of how stellar objects behave, and how the study of stars pushes the frontier of understanding in these areas of physics.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 238
AY
482
Hours
1-3
Selected Topics in Astronomy

This course may deal with any astronomy topic not covered by existing courses. The course title is added at the time the course is taught. Repeat credit is allowed for different course titles.

AY
491
Hours
1-3
Independent Study I

No description available.

AY
492
Hours
1-3
Independent Study II

(refer to AY 491 Independent Study I).

BSC
108
N
Hours
4
Intro Biology Non Maj I

Lecture and laboratory. Not open to biology majors or minors, pre-health professions students, or students with credit for BSC 114:115 and BSC 116:117 (or the honors equivalents, BSC 118 and BSC 120). Survey of the basic principles of cellular biology, genetics, plant and animal diversity, and evolution. Usually offered fall, spring, and summer. BSC 108 and BSC 109 may be taken in either order.

Natural Science
BSC
109
N
Hours
4
Intro Biology Non Maj II

Lecture and laboratory. Not open to biology majors or minors, or to pre-health professions students. Study of the physiology of living organisms with emphasis on the physiology of humans. Includes an overview of general ecology and animal behavior. Usually offered fall, spring and summer. BSC 108 and BSC 109 may be taken in either order.

Natural Science
BSC
114
N
Hours
3
Principles Of Biology I

For biology majors, biology minors and pre-health professions students. Study of general biological principles, including the chemical basis of life; cellular biology, including cell structure and metabolism, genetics evolution; and a survey of simple organisms, including viruses, bacteria, protista and fungi. Offered fall, spring and summer. NOTE: A student must take both BSC 114 and BSC 115 in order to use either one of the courses to satisfy a portion of the natural science (N) requirement of the University Core Curriculum.

Natural Science
BSC
115
N
Hours
1
Laboratory Biology I

No description available.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: BSC 114
Natural Science
BSC
116
N
Hours
3
Principles Biology II

For biology majors, biology minors, and pre-health professions students. Study of the structure, function, and ecology of organisms, including bryophytes, vascular plants, invertebrate animals, and vertebrate animals. Offered fall, spring, and summer. NOTE: A student must take both BSC 116 and BSC 117 in order to use either one of the courses to satisfy a portion of the natural science (N) requirement of the University Core Curriculum.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114 and BSC 115 or BSC 118
Natural Science
BSC
117
N
Hours
1
Biology II Laboratory

No description available.

Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: BSC 116
Natural Science
BSC
118
N, UH
Hours
4
Honors General Biology I

Lecture, discussion period, and laboratory. Thorough study of general biological principles, including the chemical basis of life, cellular biology, genetics, evolution, and a survey of prokaryotic organisms.

Prerequisite(s): Honors attribute or ACT score of 28 or above
Natural Science, University Honors
BSC
120
N, UH
Hours
4
Honors Gen Biology II

Lecture, discussion period, and laboratory. Thorough study of the structure, function, physiology, and ecology of organisms, including higher and lower plants and vertebrates and invertebrate animals.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114 and BSC 115 or BSC 118
Natural Science, University Honors
BSC
215
Hours
4
Human Anatomy & Physiology I

Lecture, laboratory, and laboratory lecture. Integrated survey of human anatomy and physiology that includes cellular aspects; tissues and skin; the skeletal, muscular, nervous and endocrine systems; and the special senses of sight, hearing, taste, and smell.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 108 or BSC 109 or BSC 118 or BSC 120 or BSC 114 and BSC 115; or BSC 116 and BSC 117; or CH 102 or CH 105 or CH 118
BSC
216
Hours
4
Human Anatomy & Physiology II

Lecture, laboratory, and laboratory lecture. Integrated survey of human anatomy and physiology that includes the respiratory, circulatory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 215
BSC
220
Hours
3
Biol Evol

An introductory course on the evidence for evolution, mechanisms of evolutionary change, natural and sexual speciation, and common misconceptions about evolution.

BSC
242
Hours
4
Microbiology And Man

For students majoring in nursing, education, and human environmental sciences. Lecture and laboratory. Introduction to microbiology with an emphasis on the relationships between man and protozoa, bacteria, viruses, and fungi. NOTE: Credit will not be granted for both BSC 242 and BSC 310.

Prerequisite(s): CH 101 or CH 104 or CH 117; and CH 102 or CH 105 or CH 118; and BSC 108 or BSC 109 or BSC 114 or BSC 118 or BSC 215 or BSC 216
BSC
300
Hours
3
Cell Biology

The course is designed to provide an understanding of the molecular basis of cell function. Topics include metabolism, gene control, cell membranes, and cell-to-cell signaling.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114 or BSC 118; and CH 102 or CH 118
BSC
303
Hours
3
Field Zoology

A field-based course with lecture and lab combined. A survey of the taxonomy, ecology, and identification of local biota. Offered irregularly.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114; and BSC 115 or BSC 118; and BSC 116; and BSC 117 or BSC 120
BSC
310
Hours
3
Microbiology

Lecture. Survey course on microorganisms, including protozoa, bacteria, viruses, fungi, and algae. Credit will not be granted for both BSC 310 and BSC 242.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114; and BSC 115 or BSC 118; and BSC 116; and BSC 117 or BSC 120
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: CH 231
BSC
311
Hours
3
Gen Bacteriol & Physiol

Fundamental course in bacteriology with emphasis on bacterial morphology, physiology, nutrition, and genetics.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 310 and CH 232
BSC
312
Hours
2
Microbiology Lab

General microbiology laboratory to accompany BSC 310.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 310
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: BSC 310
BSC
313
W
Hours
3
Gen Bacteriology Lab

Lecture and laboratory. Course presents methods for the isolation, microscopic observation, enumeration, and determination of the biochemical characteristics of bacteria. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 312
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: BSC 311
Writing
BSC
314
Hours
3
Dendrology

This class will be a combination of lectures, field trips, and some inside laboratory plant identification exercises. The majority of the class will be conducted in natural areas surrounding Tuscaloosa. Most class time is dedicated to lab- and field-based activities.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114 and BSC 115 or BSC 118 and BSC 116 and BSC 117 or BSC 120 or permission of the instructor.
BSC
315
Hours
3
Genetics

Study of transmission and function of genes, gene organization, regulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genes, and applications of genetics.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114 or BSC 118; and CH 101 or CH 117; and CH 102 or CH 118
BSC
320
W
Hours
4
Freshwater Studies

Lecture and laboratory. Introduction to freshwater natural history and ecology with specific emphasis on the common freshwater habitats of Alabama.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114; and BSC 115 or BSC 118; and BSC 116; and BSC 117 or BSC 120
Writing
BSC
325
Hours
4
Tropical Plant Diversity

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the relevant aspects of tropical ecosystems and tropical plants.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114 or BSC 118; and BSC 115; and BSC 116 or BSC 120; and BSC 117
BSC
340
Hours
3
Principles of Natural Resources Conservation

Introduces students to basic principles of natural resources conservation, including fundamental concepts in natural resource conservation and management. Examines humanity’s past and present impacts on world environments; the influence of culture and the wants, needs, and desires of human beings will be integrated into the material. Discusses conservation of natural resources, including soil, water, air, forests, rangelands, energy, wildlife and fisheries, based on scientific principles.

Prerequisite(s): (BSC 114 and BSC 115 or BSC 118) OR (BSC 116 and BSC 117 or BSC 120)
BSC
360
W
Hours
4
Plant Biology

Lecture and laboratory. This course is designed to provide you with comprehensive exposure to the subject of plant biology. You will learn about the structure, function, systematics, evolution and ecological roles of plants including algae, mosses, liverworts, ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms. If you are a person who has over-specialized in zoology or human biology, this course will expand your horizons significantly. As a study of producers (plants!), this course will examine these organisms that are essential to life because of their position at the energy and elemental intake portion of the energy pyramid and the food web! Human survival is dependent on plants. At the end of this course students should take away an appreciation for the extensive role plants play in our ecosystem as well as our everyday life. The course will consist of lectures, laboratory experiments, group discussions and other activities relating to course material. Registration is required for both lecture and laboratory. WRITING PROFICIENCY WITHIN THIS DISCIPLINE IS REQUIRED FOR A PASSING GRADE IN THIS COURSE.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114; and BSC 115 or BSC 118; and BSC 116; and BSC 117 or BSC 120
Writing
BSC
371
W
Hours
4
Biology of Lower Plants

4 Cr Hours. Lecture and Laboratory. This course is designed to provide you with comprehensive exposure to the subject of biology of lower plants. You will learn about the morphology, systematics, evolution, economic significance and ecological roles of the lower plants including cyanobacteria, algae, mosses, liverworts, fern allies and ferns with emphasis in their diversity in the southeastern USA. If you are a person who has over-specialized in zoology or human biology, this course will expand your horizons significantly. This course will examine these organisms that are essential to life because of their position at the energy pyramid and the food web, the negative effect on the environment and human health, and their commercial importance. At the end of this course students should take away an appreciation for the extensive diversity and roles the lower plants play in our ecosystem as well as our everyday life. The course will consist of lectures, laboratory experiments, group discussions and other activities relating to course material. Registration is required for both lecture and laboratory. WRITING PROFICIENCY WITHIN THIS DISCIPLINE IS REQUIRED FOR A PASSING GRADE IN THIS COURSE.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114/115 and BSC 116/117, or BSC 118 and BSC 120
Writing
BSC
373
Hours
4
Vertebrate Zoology

Lecture and laboratory. Introductory course in the study of vertebrate zoology. Subjects included are principles of systematics and nomenclature, a survey of vertebrate taxa, the species concept, analysis of taxonomic characters, and an introduction to zoogeography and behavior.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114; and BSC 115 or BSC 118; and BSC 116; and BSC 117 or BSC 120
BSC
376
W
Hours
4
Invertebrate Zoology

Lecture and laboratory. The classification, morphology, evolution, and ecology of invertebrate animals.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114; and BSC 115 or BSC 118; and BSC 116; and BSC 117 or BSC 120
Writing
BSC
380
C
Hours
3
Introduction to probability and statistics for biologists

This course will provide an introduction to probability and statistical methods that are commonly used in the biological sciences. Practical, real-world examples from biology, ecology, and natural resources management will be used throughout the course. This course is aimed at 300-level students who intend to work with biological data, or anyone interested in statistics. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 112 or MATH 115 or MATH 125 or MATH 145 and CS 102
Computer Science
BSC
385
Hours
3
Ecology and Evolution

This course introduces the student to two fundamental disciplines in biology – ecology and evolution. We introduce the student to the processes common to both disciplines and show how these have shaped the diversity and organization of life on this planet.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 112 or MATH 115 or MATH 121 or MATH 125 or MATH 145; and BSC 114; and BSC 115 or BSC 118; and BSC 116; and BSC 117 or BSC 120
BSC
386
Hours
2
General Ecology Lab

Offered irregularly.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 385
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: BSC 385
BSC
390
UH
Hours
1-8
Honors Thesis Research

Individual research conducted under the direction of an advisor and reported in an acceptable thesis. May be repeated over two to four semesters for a maximum 8 hours.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 315 and BSC 300 and BSC 385
University Honors
BSC
391
Hours
1-2
Tutorial In Biol Science

Survey of the literature relating to a topic approved by the supervising faculty member; not to include laboratory or field research. A formal paper and/or examination is required. May be taken for one credit hour in each of two consecutive semesters, or for one or two credit hours in any one semester. Offered according to demand.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114; and BSC 115 or BSC 118; and BSC 116; and BSC 117 or BSC 120
BSC
393
W
Hours
2
Biology Outreach

Service learning. Survey of literature, design of active learning projects and teaching science concepts to elementary students to encourage and enrich young children’s interest in science. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course. A maximum of 4 hours credit may be applied to the requirements for the biology or microbiology major.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114; and BSC 115 or BSC 116 or BSC 118; and BSC 117 or BSC 120
Writing
BSC
396
Hours
1-6
Resident Study

Prerequisite: Written approval from the department office prior to registration. Credit awarded is determined by the extent of the student's participation but may not exceed 6 hours.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114; and BSC 115 or BSC 118; and BSC 116; and BSC 117 or BSC 120
BSC
398
Hours
1-4
Undergraduate Research

Independent research or research participation. A maximum of 4 hours credit for BSC 398 may be applied to the requirements of the biology and microbiology majors; an additional 4 hours may be taken as elective credit and applied to the 120-hour requirement.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114; and BSC 115 or BSC 118; and BSC 116; and BSC 117 or BSC 120
BSC
399
W
Hours
2
Presentation of UG Research

Exploration of the process of presenting research results in different written formats including: abstract, poster, and full journal article. How the needs for clear presentation and response to peer review can inform the experimental process will also be covered.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 398
Writing
BSC
400
Hours
4
Vertebrate Funct Morphol

Recommended for pre-health professions students. Lecture and laboratory. The comparative anatomy of the vertebrates with emphasis on functional features of several vertebrate species. Laboratory work deals mainly with identifying anatomical features of several vertebrate species.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114 and BSC 115; or BSC 118; and BSC 116 and BSC 117; or BSC 120; and BSC 300
BSC
403
Hours
2
Intro To Bsc Instruction

Prerequisites: BSC 114:115 or BSC 118, BSC 116:117 or BSC 120, and junior or senior standing, formal application, and a satisfactory interview.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114 and BSC 115; or BSC 118; BSC 116 and BSC 117; or BSC 120
BSC
404
UH
Hours
2
Honors Intro To Bsc Instruction

Prerequisites: BSC 114:115 or BSC 118, BSC 116:117 or BSC 120, and junior or senior standing, Honors attribute, formal application, and a satisfactory interview.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114 and BSC 115; or BSC 118; and BSC 116 and BSC 117; or BSC 120
University Honors
BSC
407
UH
Hours
1
Honors Seminar In Bsc

Seminar and discussion. In the first semester, students present seminars based on the current literature. In the second semester, students present seminars derived from their honors theses. A maximum of 2 hours of credit for BSC 407 may be applied to the requirements of the biology or microbiology major. Offered according to demand.

University Honors
BSC
409
Hours
2
Pre-Health Apprenticeship I

This course provides a one semester apprenticeship at a local health care facility and is intended for all pre-health professional students. This course also has a service learning component. It does not count as applicable hours for the biology major or minor.

BSC
410
Hours
2
Pre-Health Apprenticeship II

This course provides a one semester apprenticeship at a local health care facility and is intended for all pre-health professional students. This course also has a service learning component. It does not count as applicable hours for the biology major or minor.

BSC
412
Hours
3
Limnology

Study of freshwater environments and the organisms that live in lakes, ponds, and streams. May be taken with BSC 413 or separately.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114; and BSC 115 or BSC 118; and BSC 116; and BSC 117 or BSC 120
BSC
415
Hours
3
Wetland Ecology

An in-depth analysis of wetland ecology emphasizing the biology and ecology of vascular plants, including plant adaptations to anaerobic soils, reproductive adaptations, habitat and plant zonation, and the role of plants in ecosystem function. Offered in alternate years.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 385
BSC
417
Hours
3
Environmental Modeling

An integrated study of quantitative principles and computer-based solution techniques important for understanding environmental systems and for environmental problem solving.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 125 and CH 101 or CH 117; and CH 102 or CH 118 and BSC 385
BSC
420
Hours
4
Principles Of Systematics

Introduction to the principles, methods, and applications of systematics to analysis of morphological and molecular data. Includes introduction to biological classifications and nomenclature.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 360 or BSC 373 or BSC 376 or BSC 483
BSC
421
Hours
3
Personalized and Genetic Medicine

This course will examine biological techniques that are advancing medical research and care. Topics include personalized medicine, direct-to-consumer genetic testing, predictive medicine, pharmacogenomics, and preimplantation genetic diagnosis. It will also explore concomitant ethical, legal, and societal ramifications related to many of these discoveries, such as ownership of biological material, informed consent for human experimentation, the burden of knowledge regarding genetic information, eugenics, and the Genetic Information Non-Discrimination Act.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 300 and BSC 315
BSC
422
Hours
3
Biology of Cancer

This course is an introduction to the biological principals that explain the origins, development, pathology, and treatment of cancer. Students will work in teams assigned to particular types of cancer and will investigate what is known on various topics as related to that type of cancer.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 300 minimum grade of C- and BSC 315 minimum grade of C-
BSC
424
Hours
3
Human Physiology

Topics covered are the digestive, nervous, reproductive, immune, muscular, blood, cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, and body-fluid systems. May be taken with BSC 425 or separately.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 300
BSC
425
Hours
2
Human Physiology Lab

Hands-on experience for understanding the principles and mechanisms of physiological processes of the human body. Major emphases on organ system performance, whole-body metabolism, and energetics.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 424
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: BSC 424
BSC
428
W
Hours
4
Biology Of Fishes

Lecture and laboratory. Survey of the structure, function, ecology, and classification of fishes. Offered in alternate years.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 385
Writing
BSC
431
Hours
3
Pathogenic Microbiology

Study of microorganisms related to health and disease with emphasis on molecular mechanism of pathogenesis. Offered in alternate years.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 310
BSC
432
Hours
3
Pathogenic Mibrobiol Lab

Practical experience in the isolation, characterization, and identification of pathogenic microorganisms. Offered in alternate years.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 312 and BSC 431
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: BSC 431
BSC
434
Hours
4
Plant Systematics

Lecture and laboratory. Characteristics and distribution of the major families of vascular plants as well as practice in the collection and identification of flowering plants. One weekend field trip required. Offered in alternate years.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 360
BSC
435
Hours
4
Immunology

Thorough exploration of various aspects of modern immunology at the molecular and cellular levels.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 310
BSC
436
W
Hours
3
Immunology Laboratory

Practical experience in modern immunological techniques. Offered in alternate years.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 435
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: BSC 435
Writing
BSC
439
Hours
3
Bch/Molecular Biology Lab

Students participate in the generation of new knowledge, thus the experiments vary. Techniques taught include agarose gel electrophoresis, cycle sequencing, sequence analysis, plasmid purification, restriction endonuclease digestion, gel purification of DNA, ligation, transformation, primer design, PCR, gene knockouts, protein fusions, and enzyme assays.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 450
BSC
441
Hours
3
Developmental Biology

The course provides basic information about events in developing animal systems, emphasizing cellular, molecular, and genetic research approaches to the study of development.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 300 and BSC 315
BSC
442
Hours
4
Integrated Genomics

An advanced discovery-based laboratory course designed to introduce the process of gene discovery and integrate modern genomics techniques and bioinformatic database usage.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 300 and BSC 315
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: BSC 315
BSC
444
Hours
3
General Virology

A survey of viruses, viral replication, and viral pathogenesis, including bacterial, animal, and plant viruses. The role of viruses in molecular biology is emphasized.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 300 or BSC 310
BSC
448
W
Hours
3
Animal Behavior

This course is designed to provide modern perspectives on the study of animal behavior, pulling from fields as diverse as evolutionary biology, ecology, neurobiology and economics. However there will be a historical undercurrent which will illustrate the roots of this truly interdisciplinary field.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114; and BSC 115 or BSC 116 or BSC 118; and BSC 117 or BSC 120; and BSC 385
Writing
BSC
449
W
Hours
3
Endocrinology

A detailed examination of the vertebrate endocrine system that uses a comparative approach to explore intricate relationships between the brain, endocrine glands, hormones and target organs.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114; and BSC 115 or BSC 118; and BSC 116; and BSC 117 or BSC 120; and BSC 300
Writing
BSC
450
Hours
3
Fundamentals of Biochemistry

A one-semester survey of protein structure, enzymes, bioenergetics, metabolism and its regulation. Designed for advanced undergraduate students.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 300 minimum grade of C- and CH 232 minimum grade of C-
BSC
451
Hours
3
Molecular Biology

A one-semester survey of molecular biology that emphasizes gene structure, function, and regulation of expression. Offered spring semester.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 311 or BSC 315; and BSC 450; and CH 462 or
BSC
456
Hours
3
Microbial Ecology

Study of microorganisms in the environment, with emphasis on their roles in energy transformations, biogeochemical cycles, and biotic interactions.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 310 or BSC 385
BSC
460
W
Hours
4
Human Developmental Biology

Lecture and laboratory. Development of the human embryo and fetus, including molecular, physiological, and structural aspects of morphogenesis, and functional development. Offered in alternate years.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114; and BSC 115 or BSC 118; and BSC 116; and BSC 117 or BSC 120; and BSC 300
Writing
BSC
464
W
Hours
4
Biology Of Algae

Lecture and laboratory. Freshwater and marine algae: their structure, development, taxonomy, and distribution.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 360 or BSC 310
Writing
BSC
465
Hours
3
Prin Of Toxicology

The study of adverse effects of chemicals on living organisms and methods for predicting the likelihood of such effects, including descriptive, mechanistic, and regulatory aspects.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 300 and BSC 315
BSC
469
Hours
4
Histology Of Vertebrates

Lecture and laboratory. Identification of tissue types and components, histogenesis and function of tissues.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114; and BSC 115 or BSC 118; and BSC 116; and BSC 117 or BSC 120; and BSC 300
BSC
470
Hours
3
Principles of Population Genetics

Population genetics is the study of how evolutionary forces (genetic drift, natural selection, mutation, and gene flow) affect allele and genotype frequencies in populations. Population genetics is a field with a rich theoretical history that has allowed scientists to make predictions about these evolutionary processes. With the advent of massive amounts of genetic data in many species, it is now possible to test these predictions, and a solid foundation in theory, its expectations, and assumptions is crucial for interpreting results from genetic analyses. Students should expect to learn how evolutionary forces acting on individuals affect patterns of inheritance and ultimately drive the changes we see between species.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 315 minimum grade of C- and BSC 385 minimum grade of C- or permission of the instructor.
BSC
471
W
Hours
3
Plant Physiology

A general survey for upper-level undergraduate students covering all aspects of plant physiology including plant transport, translocation of sugars in plants, plant biochemistry, plant metabolism, plant growth and development, photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation, flowering and plant hormones. The course will consist of lectures, in-class experiments, group discussions, presentations and other activities relating to course material.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 300 and BSC 360
Writing
BSC
472
W
Hours
4
Mycology

Lecture and laboratory. Introduction to the fungi and their biology, including aspects of their structure and function, taxonomy, genetics, and ecology. Offered in alternate years.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 310
Writing
BSC
473
W
Hours
3
Bioinformatics

Bioinformatics BSC 473/573 covers the tools and approaches necessary to perform computational analysis of large datasets. We will focus on analyzing high-throughput sequencing data although the tools we will learn are applicable to a wide range of modern biological questions. Specific topics include operating in a UNIX/bash shell environment, scripting, genome assembly, alignment, and algorithms. BSC 473/573 is a writing course and writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): Grade of C- or higher in BSC 315 Genetics.
Writing
BSC
475
W
Hours
4
General Entomology

Lecture and laboratory. Survey of the structure, function, classification, and habits of insects.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 385
Writing
BSC
476
Hours
4
Aquatic Insects

Lecture and laboratory. Survey of aquatic insects with emphasis on their identification, life histories, and ecology. Offered in alternate years.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 385
BSC
480
W
Hours
3
Plant Ecology

This course will examine the ecology of plants at different levels: individual, population and community.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 385 and BSC 360
Writing
BSC
481
Hours
3
Foundations in Advanced Biostatistics with Applications to R

This course provides an overview to common statistical methods used in biological research, using case studies from biology, ecology, and natural resources management. The overarching objective of this course is to give students the ability to use and effectively evaluate biological data. We will demonstrate and conduct statistical analyses with an emphasis on utilizing the statistical computing language, R, to apply statistical concepts to biological and ecological data.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 380
BSC
482
Hours
3
Conservation Biology

A thorough examination of the principles of conservation biology.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 385
BSC
483
W
Hours
3
Evolution

Thorough investigation of evolution, including population genetics, molecular evolution, adaptation, and speciation. Offered in the spring semester.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 385 and BSC 315
Writing
BSC
484
Hours
1
Aquatic Biology Seminar

Review and discussion of current topics in aquatic biology.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 320 and BSC 385; and BSC 412 or BSC 490
BSC
485
Hours
3
Foundations in Forest Resources and Conservation

This course provides an introduction to the foundational ideas of forest resources and conservation. The course includes a history of the forestry profession and a variety of perspectives to develop students' knowledge of forestry field and research methods. This course also helps students develop an understanding and appreciation of the diversity of forest resources both here in Alabama and globally.

Prerequisite(s): (BSC 114 minimum grade of C- or BSC 118 minimum grade of C-) and (BSC 116 minimum grade of C- or BSC 120 minimum grade of C-) and BSC 340 minimum grade of C- or BSC 385 minimum grade of C-.
BSC
487
Hours
3
Biogeography

Examination of the ecological and historical factors influencing the geographic distribution of plants and animals. Offered alternate years.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 385
BSC
488
Hours
1
Research Seminars in Biology

This course is a one-hour weekly seminar where students will be exposed to current research being performed in the UA Department of Biological Sciences and at other institutions. Students will gain exposure and familiarity with research and current methodology being used in the fields of Ecology, Evolution and Systematics, Animal Behavior and Physiology, Microbiology and Cell and Molecular Biology.

Prerequisite(s): 6 hours or more of BSC or MS courses at the 300-400 levels.
BSC
490
Hours
4
Stream Ecology

Lecture and laboratory. Thorough study of the structural (physical and biological) and functional attributes (energy flow, nutrient cycling, community structure) characteristic of stream and river ecosystems. Offered in alternate years.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 385
BSC
493
W
Hours
3
Cell Cycle Regulation

In-depth review and discussion of recent scientific research literature dealing with mechanisms of eukaryotic cell cycle regulation and their significance in human cancers. Provides a foundation for further studies in the cell cycle field, which impacts many areas of cell, molecular, and developmental biology.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 300 minimum grade of C- and BSC 315 minimum grade of C-and BSC 450 minimum grade of C-.
Writing
BSC
496
W
Hours
3
Bioremediation

This course will explore how diverse organisms transform contaminants in soils and groundwater and how microbes/plants interact with environmental conditions present at bioremediation sites. There will be an emphasis on modern molecular methods developed to detect impacted sites, to monitor the effectiveness of bioremediation and/or the presence of contaminant degrading organisms, and the development and potential use of genetically modified organisms to remediate contaminants.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 310 minimum grade of C-
Writing
BSC
497
Hours
1-4
Special Topics

A biological sciences topic not covered in other courses. The credit hours and format are determined as appropriate to the topic, and a course title is added to the schedule of classes. Offered according to demand.

Prerequisite(s): BSC 114; and BSC 115 or BSC 118; and BSC 116; and BSC 117 or BSC 120
BUI
100
Hours
1
Convocation

Experiences to extend and complement the Blount Undergraduate Initiative foundation courses. May be repeated once for credit.

BUI
101
HU
Hours
3
Foundation: Origins

A text-centered exploration of major questions that integrate liberal arts education and form the basis of the Blount Undergraduate Initiative. Emphasis is on origins of the natural world, human culture, and human understanding.

Humanities
BUI
102
SB
Hours
3
Foundation: Possibilities

A text-centered exploration of major questions that integrate liberal arts education and form the basis of the Blount Undergraduate Initiative. Emphasis is on significant issues in the discourse on human possibilities.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
BUI
301
Hours
3
Thematic Seminar

A text-centered study of one of the core problems that define the history of ideas in the liberal arts. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours.

BUI
401
Hours
3
Blount Capstone Worldviews

An examination of the "worldviews" of various epochs and the completion of a senior project. Students learn how individual beliefs about what is actual, what is possible, and what is desirable can be combined into a single unified understanding of the world, and how such a worldview has implications for what we should do and how we should live.

CC
201
Hours
3
Introduction to Cyber Criminology

This course will introduce students to the traditional and contemporary forms of cyber crime, including hacking, insider threat, Internet child pornography use, cyber bullying, and cyber terrorism. Not only will students learn how computers can be either the target or tool in cyber crimes, this course will examine such crimes from both social and behavioral science perspectives, such as the personality traits associated with computer deviance. Finally, this course will provide a general overview of the digital forensic investigation as well as the analysis of digital evidence. No prior knowledge in any of these areas is required.

CC
290
Hours
3
Special Topics in Cyber Crime

Examination of selected issues in cyber security in the United States and throughout the world.

CC
301
Hours
3
Cyber Law and Policy

This course examines cyber criminology from a law and policy perspective, including its impact on Fourth and Fifth Amendment jurisprudence and the changing conceptions of privacy and identity. Topics will focus on the effects of cyber criminology on how criminal laws are conceptualized, enforced, and prosecuted. A central part of the course is a Moot Court component in which students will write a legal brief and argue their side of a cyber-related legal case in front of a panel of lawyers and law students acting as judges.

Prerequisite(s): CC 201
CC
395
Hours
1-9
Internship

An opportunity for students to conduct career exploration and build a record of experience in the field of cyber criminology and digital forensics. To take this course students must obtain permission from the instructor for a specific number of hours and pass a background check.

Prerequisite(s): CC 201 A maximum of 3 hours can be used toward the minor. Instructor must approve the number of hours and the student cannot deviate from those hours without permission of instructor.
CC
401
Hours
3
Law Enforcement in the Digital Age

This course examines the role that technology plays in modern-day policing, and provides students with a detailed overview of how the cyber, digital, and technological worlds have impacted policing historically. In the technology component of the course, students will comprehend computer basics, understanding computer and human networks, and identify the broad range of technologies used by police departments (e.g., less-than-lethal weapons, databases).

Prerequisite(s): CC 201
CC
402
Hours
3
Digital Forensic Investigation

This course is a non-technical overview of the digital crime scene. This course aims to answer the question, “How do law enforcement officers investigate the digital crime scene?” This course will cover how digital forensic investigators identify, preserve, and extract digital evidence using different forensic tools and software. This course will also cover the various legal challenges in digital forensic investigations, including admissibility of evidence in courts, right to privacy, and the right to avoid self-incrimination.

Prerequisite(s): CC 201
CC
490
Hours
3
Special Topics in Cyber Criminology

Examination of selected issues in cyber security in the United States and throughout the world. A maximum of six hours may be used toward the minor.

Prerequisite(s): CC 201
CD
225
Hours
3
Intro Comm Disorders

Study of the types of speech, language, and hearing disorders; an introduction to the principles of rehabilitation of communicative disorders; and consideration of employment settings.

CD
226
Hours
3
Lang & Speech Develop

Theory and practice of normal speech and language processes and sequences.

CD
244
Hours
3
Phonetics

Study of the principles of phonetics and their application to speech. The International Phonetic Alphabet is used for study and transcription.

CD
275
Hours
3
Anat Physio Sech Hear Mechansm

Detailed study of the bases of speech and hearing, including anatomy, physiology, and neurology.

CD
277
Hours
1
Preprofess Lab Experienc

Structured observational activities for students prior to their enrollment in a practicum course in speech-language pathology. Open to CD majors only.

CD
308
Hours
3
Speech Disorders I

An introduction to articulation, phonology, & language disorders in children & adults as well as literacy & aural rehabilitation.

Prerequisite(s): CD 225 CD 226 CD 244 CD 275
CD
309
Hours
3
Speech Disorders II

An introduction to aphasia, traumatic brain injury, dementia, dysarthria, and apraxia.

Prerequisite(s): CD 225 CD 226 CD 244 CD 275
CD
350
Hours
1-3
Independent Study

Directed readings in an area of communicative disorders. Open to CD majors only.

Prerequisite(s): Minimum of 18 hours in CD courses and permission of the instructor.
CD
351
Hours
3
Hearing Science

This course will provide the student with an understanding of the physical aspects of sound and how it is processed physiologically through the human auditory system. In addition, the student will become familiar with the anatomy of the hearing mechanism.

Prerequisite(s): CD 225 CD 226 CD 244 CD 275
CD
377
W
Hours
3
Clin Practicum I Speech

Supervised clinical practice in speech therapy with children. Open to CD majors only. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): CD 225 CD 226 CD 244 CD 275 CD 277 CD 308 By application only.
Writing
CD
378
Hours
1-3
Clinic Pract II Speech

Supervised clinical practice in speech therapy with children.

Prerequisite(s): CD 225 CD 226 CD 244 CD 275 CD 277 CD 308 CD 377 By application only.
CD
402
Hours
3
Psychology of Language

Language is a system of symbols that we use to communicate. The power of this system enables us to share the contents of our minds with other people who share that language. The evolution of language has profoundly shaped the lives of human beings, enabling our species to transmit knowledge from one generation to the next. This accumulated knowledge over time and space has allowed humans to proliferate as a species. New words are added to a language as new ideas emerge. The psychology of language is the study of the processes by which we as human beings generate grammatical sequences of linguistic symbols for comprehension by the listener.

Prerequisite(s): CD 225 CD 226 CD 244 CD 275
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: CD 277
CD
411
Hours
3
Speech Science

A study of speech physiology, basic electronics, basic acoustics, speech acoustics, auditory perception, and neuroanatomy. Class work and laboratory sessions cover speech spectrographic analysis, basic sound measurement, and selected other instrumentation used in the speech and hearing science laboratory.

Prerequisite(s): CD 225 CD 226 CD 244 CD 275
CD
416
Hours
3
Multicultural Issues

A framework for systematically analyzing cultural similarities and differences will be provided and will serve as a model to examine cultural differences in the clinical setting.

Prerequisite(s): CD 225 and CD 226 and CD 244
CD
443
Hours
3
Basic Audiology

Introduction to hearing evaluation, conservation, and impairment. Also considers the auditory system: anatomy, physiology, and pathology. Includes three laboratory sessions.

Prerequisite(s): CD 225 CD 226 CD 244 CD 275
CD
444
Hours
3
Aural Rehabilitation

The rehabilitation of hearing-impaired people primarily through auditory and visual training is addressed. Other sensory training, language development, speech production, and guidance are also considered. Open to CD majors only.

Prerequisite(s): Minimum overall GPA of 2.5 CD 225 CD 226 CD 244 CD 275
CD
445
Hours
1-3
Audiology Lab Experience

Supervised laboratory or clinical experience in hearing evaluation and rehabilitation.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of the 200-and 300-level undergraduate CD classes as well as CD 443. By application only.
CD
454
Hours
3
Fluency Disorders

The study of the nature, assessment, and treatment of stuttering. Emphasis on understanding the different onset and developmental theories and different approaches to treatment.

CD
455
Hours
3
Voice Disorders

This course is designed to provide basic knowledge and skills needed for the evaluation and treatment of voiced language disorders.

CD
462
Hours
3
Neuroscience for the Study of Communicative Disorders

An introductory course in neuroscience as it relates to the field of speech-language pathology. Students will be able to explain the anatomy and physiology of the brain, explain functions associated with structures in both the central and peripheral nervous systems, appreciate the nature and scope of neurogenic impairments, and understand brain abnormalities and neurological illnesses.

Prerequisite(s): CD 225, CD 226, CD 244, and CD 275
CH
100
N
Hours
5
General Chemistry I - Plus

This course is designed for students with lower level math backgrounds to successfully complete the freshman level entry course in general chemistry, a foundational and core science survey course. This is a proposed 5 credit hr course for students who are taking, or meet the requirements to take, MATH 112 or 113 and who do not have placement into at least MATH 115. Analysis shows such students to be at high risk (~ 50%) for a DFW outcome in the traditional CH101 general chemistry course. Chemistry topic coverage for CH100 is identical to that of CH101 (ch 1-11, Tro textbook), but the course content is expanded to include additional development of basic science, chemistry, math, and problem solving skills. Additional lecture time is included for instruction in these areas, including added supervised problem solving and mentoring of these students to better prepare and train them for successful completion of the first semester of general chemistry. Student who receive credit for CH100 will qualify to subsequently take CH102. Students cannot receive credit for both CH 100 and CH 101.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 100 or MATH 112 or higher
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: MATH 112 or MATH 113 or higher
Natural Science
CH
101
N
Hours
4
General Chemistry

Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Degree credit is not awarded for both CH 101 and CH 107 or for both CH 101 and CH 117. A survey of the fundamental facts, principles, and theories of general chemistry. Usually offered in the fall, spring, and summer semesters.

Prerequisite(s): MAPL of 467 or higher or ACT of 24 or higher or SAT of 560 or higher or MATH 100 or MATH 112 or MATH 113 or MATH 115 or MATH 121 or MATH 125 or MATH 126 or MATH 145 or MATH 146 or MATH 100 or MATH 112 or MATH 113 or MATH 115 or MATH 121 or MATH 125 or MATH 126 or MATH 145 or MATH 146
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: MATH 112 or MATH 113 or MATH 115 or MATH 121 or MATH 125 or MATH 126 or MATH 145 or MATH 146
Natural Science
CH
102
N
Hours
4
General Chemistry

Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Degree credit is not awarded for both CH 102 and CH 105 or both CH 102 and CH 108. Continuation of CH 101, with basic inorganic chemistry. Includes a systematic study of the elements and the structures, properties, and reactions of their compounds. Usually offered in the fall, spring, and summer semesters.

Prerequisite(s): CH 101 or CH 117
Natural Science
CH
104
N
Hours
4
Introductory Chemistry

Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. The course is primarily for students in the Capstone College of Nursing and the College of Human Environmental Sciences; it may not be substituted for CH 101 except with departmental permission. Degree credit is not awarded for both CH 104 and CH 107. An introductory survey of the facts, principles, and theories of chemistry. Usually offered in the fall and summer semesters.

Natural Science
CH
105
N
Hours
4
Introductory Org Chem

Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Not open to chemistry majors or minors or to students who have earned credit for CH 102. Degree credit is not awarded for both CH 105 and CH 102 or both CH 105 and CH 108. The course may not be substituted for CH 101 or CH 102. Brief survey of organic and biochemistry. Usually offered in the spring and summer semesters.

Prerequisite(s): CH 104 or CH 101 or CH 117
Natural Science
CH
117
N, UH
Hours
4
Honors General Chemistry

Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Not open to students who have earned credit for CH 101. Degree credit is not awarded for both CH 117 and CH 101 or both CH 117 and CH 107. A comprehensive study of the fundamental facts, principles, and theories of general chemistry. Usually offered in the fall semester.

Natural Science, University Honors
CH
118
N, UH
Hours
4
Honors General Chemistry

Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Not open to students who have earned credit for CH 102. Degree credit is not awarded for both CH 118 and CH 102, both CH 118 and CH 105, or both CH 118 and CH 108. Continuation of CH 117 with basic inorganic chemistry. Includes a systematic study of the elements and of the structures, properties, and reactions of their compounds. Usually offered in the spring semester.

Prerequisite(s): CH 117
Natural Science, University Honors
CH
155
Hours
3
Forensic Science

This course will present an overview of forensic science. The course will focus on processing a crime scene as well as other topics used to connect a suspect to a given crime.

CH
223
Hours
4
Quantitative Analysis

Three lectures and one three hour laboratory. Comprehensive course covering classical methods of quantitative analysis as well as an introduction to electrochemical, spectroscopic and chromotographic methods. Usually offered in the fall, spring and summer semesters.

Prerequisite(s): CH 102 or CH 118
CH
231
Hours
3
Elem Organic Chemistry I

Three lectures. The course is an introduction to the theory and principles of organic chemistry. Topics include organic structure, syntheses, and analyses. Usually offered in the fall, spring, and summer semesters.

Prerequisite(s): CH 102 or CH 118
CH
232
Hours
3
Elem Organic Chem II

Three lectures. This course is a continuation of CH 231. Usually offered in the fall, spring, and summer semesters.

Prerequisite(s): CH 231
CH
237
Hours
2
Elem Organic Chem Lab

A one-hour lecture and five-hour laboratory. Designed for chemistry majors and chemistry minors to take concurrently with CH 232. Usually offered in the fall, spring, and summer sessions.

Prerequisite(s): CH 231
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: CH 232
CH
331
UH
Hours
3
Honors Organic Chemistry 1

Honors Organic Chemistry will combine a modern in-depth insight into our chemical world with an evolutionary understanding of how the science of chemistry came to be what it is now, and how and where it influences our everyday lives. This course may better serve the interests of students majoring in Chemistry, Chemical Biology, Biological Sciences, Pharmacy, and Material and Engineering Sciences by the inclusion of traditional chemistry topics along with careful examination of the impact of chemistry on the world around us.

Prerequisite(s): CH 102 or 118
University Honors
CH
332
UH
Hours
3
Honors Organic Chemistry 2

Honors Organic Chemistry will combine a modern in-depth insight into our chemical world with an evolutionary understanding of how the science of chemistry came to be what it is now, and how and where it influences our everyday lives. This course may better serve the interests of students majoring in Chemistry, Chemical Biology, Biological Sciences, Pharmacy, and Material and Engineering Sciences by the inclusion of traditional chemistry topics along with careful examination of the impact of chemistry on the world around us.

Prerequisite(s): CH 231 or CH 331
University Honors
CH
338
W
Hours
2
Elem Organic Chem Lab II

A one-hour lecture and five-hour laboratory. The course is designed for chemistry majors. Usually offered in the fall semester. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): CH 232 and CH 237
Writing
CH
340
Hours
3
Elem Physical Chem

Three lectures. This course is designed for students in the pre-health professional degree or pursuing the chemistry minor and is a study of the application of physical chemical concepts in biological systems. It is a.

Prerequisite(s): CH 223 and PH 102 or PH 106 or PH 126
CH
341
Hours
3
Physical Chemistry

Three lectures. The course is designed for chemistry majors and is a study of the structure and properties of matter with emphasis on theoretical principles and their mathematical interpretation. Usually offered in the fall semester.

Prerequisite(s): CH 223 and MATH 227 or MATH 247
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: PH 106 or PH 126
CH
342
Hours
3
Physical Chemistry

Three lectures. The course is designed for chemistry majors. Continuation of CH 341. Usually offered in the spring semester.

Prerequisite(s): CH 341
CH
343
Hours
1
Elem Phy Chem Lab

One three-hour laboratory. The course is designed to be taken concurrently with CH 340. Usually offered in the fall semester.

Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: CH 340
CH
348
W
Hours
2
Physical Chemistry Lab

6 hours of laboratory. The course is designed to be taken concurrently with CH 342. Usually offered in the spring semester. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): CH 341
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: CH 342
Writing
CH
396
Hours
1-3
Undergrad Research

3 hours laboratory per credit hour. The student works on a research project under the direction of a chemistry faculty member. CH 396 is offered in the fall, CH 398 is offered in the spring, and CH 399 is offered in the summer.

CH
398
Hours
1-3
Undergrad Research

No description available.

CH
399
Hours
1-3
Undergrad Research

3 hours laboratory per credit hour. The student works on a research project under the direction of a chemistry faculty member. CH 396 is offered in the fall, CH 398 is offered in the spring, and CH 399 is offered in the summer.

CH
405
Hours
3
Medicinal Chemistry

Fundamental considerations in drug design. Includes lead discovery, target identification and validation, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and metabolism, and formulations/drug delivery systems. Chemical modifications to improve efficacy and pharmacokinetics will be emphasized.

Prerequisite(s): CH 232 and either CH 461, BSC 300, or BSC 450
CH
409
Hours
3
Organometallic Chemistry

Survey of the typical reactions of organotransition metal complexes with a focus on the fundamental mechanisms of these reactions and the application of organometallic catalysts.

Prerequisite(s): CH 341 or CH 401 or CH 413
CH
410
Hours
3
Scientific Glassblowing

The course introduces students to the fundamentals of scientific glassblowing through hands-on training. Usually offered during Interim.

CH
413
Hours
4
Inorganic Chemistry

Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory. Survey in areas of coordination, main-group, and organometallic chemistry. Laboratory experiments involve the preparation, purification, and identification of inorganic compounds. Usually offered in the fall semester.

Prerequisite(s): CH 338 and CH 341
CH
424
W
Hours
4
Instrumental Analysis

Two lectures and one five-hour laboratory. The course covers the general operating principles of the commonly used analytical instruments with an emphasis on theory. Wherever possible, mathematical interpretations and derivations are given. Usually offered in the spring semester. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): CH 223 and CH 341
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: CH 348
Writing
CH
432
Hours
3
Advanced Synthetic Organic Chemistry

This course will serve as a co-listed course with CH 532. The main goal of this course is to instruct advanced organic chemistry to undergraduates.

Prerequisite(s): CH 232
CH
435
Hours
3
Inter Organic Chem

Three lectures. The course is designed to familiarize the student with mechanistic and synthetic organic chemistry. Usually offered in the fall semester.

Prerequisite(s): CH 232 and CH 342
CH
437
Hours
3
Spectroscopic Techniques

This course is an introduction to the theory, application, and interpretation of four major types of structural analysis used by synthetic chemists: absorption, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, as well as mass spectrometry. We will focus heavily on interpretation of spectra and application of these tools to address questions of structure and reactivity. While this is an organic chemistry class, examples of applications to organometallic and inorganic materials will also be presented.

Prerequisite(s): CH 232, 338, 342, and 348
CH
461
Hours
3
Biochemistry I

Three lectures. Survey of the physical and chemical properties of the molecular components and methods of isolating and analyzing them. Usually offered in the fall semester.

Prerequisite(s): CH 223 and CH 232 and CH 237
CH
462
Hours
3
Biochemistry II

Three lectures. Survey of the principal pathways of carbon, nitrogen, and energy metabolism and clinical and forensic chemistry. Usually offered in the spring semester.

Prerequisite(s): CH 461 or BSC 300
CH
463
W
Hours
3
Biochem-Clin/Foren/Chem

One lecture and one six-hour laboratory. Biochemical techniques within the structure of a semester-long research project. Topics include protein purification and chromatography, spectroscopy, electrophoresis, kinetics, and DNA manipulation. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): CH 461
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: CH 462
Writing
CH
466
Hours
3
Bioorganic Chemistry

This course will be divided into two main areas. We will begin with methods for studying enzyme reaction mechanisms. This section will include steady-state enzyme kinetics, derivation of rate equations, enzyme inhibition, isotope exchange methods, pH and viscosity effects, kinetic isotope effects, and site-directed mutagenesis. We will then utilize these methods in order to investigate the chemical mechanisms enzymes use to catalyze specific reactions (hydrolysis; group transfer; 1,1 hydrogen shift; 1,2 hydrogen shift; C-C bond formations; and redox chemistry). We will also cover the chemistry associated with several cofactors required by enzymes (flavins, thiamin pyrophosphate, tetrahydrofolate, etc).

Prerequisite(s): CH 461
CH
473
Hours
3
The Study of Oenology

The course will focus on the complex chemical substances and chemical transformations responsible for the flavor, aroma, texture, & color variations in wine. Oenology exposes students to the process of making wine from growing grapes used in wine-making to fermentation of fruit sugars through yeast growth and accompanying chemical transformations.

Prerequisite(s): CH 232 and CH 338
CH
474
Hours
3
Chemistry of Beer & Brewing

The instruction will comprise approximately 35 45-minute lecture periods and include visits to breweries in the Rheingau along with historical points of interest. Beyond a historical and cultural introduction, the course will focus on the complex chemical substances and chemical transformations responsible for the flavor, aroma, texture, & color variations beer. The Science and Chemistry of Beer & Brewing exposes students to the process of making beer from fermentation and flavoring of sweet mashes through yeast growth and accompanying chemical transformations. Participants will learn about the different types of grains and mashes used to make beer and will learn to evaluate beer, choose beer to compliment the chemistry and taste of foods and differentiate between many locally and internationally produced ales. There is a significant Biochemistry and Organic Chemistry involved in the malting, mashing and fermentation process and understanding the chemistry behind the flavor, aroma, and color of beer. Participants will lern to correlate the scientific underpinnings with the resultant beers and ales.

Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: CH 232 or CH 332 and CH 237 and CH 338
CH
475
Hours
3
Chemistry of Cooking

Chemistry as a discipline has its roots very early among the natural sciences. The ability to understand, manipulate and control substances in the environment is the central key to humankind's flexible adaptation to surroundings otherwise hostile to human life. Cooking is a subset of that science which facilitates utilization of nutrients in foods and allows for preservation for food for longer periods. Additionally, cooking is a fun, and social activity. When you're cooking, you're a chemist! Every time you follow or modify a recipe you are experimenting with acids and bases, emulsions and suspensions, gels and foams. In your kitchen you denature proteins, crystallize compounds, react enzymes with substrates, and nurture desired microbial life while suppressing harmful microbes. And unlike in a laboratory, you can eat your experiments to verify your hypotheses.

Prerequisite(s): CH 332 or CH 232
CH
491
UH
Hours
1
Honors Research Sem

The course is designed for students in the Chemistry Department Honors Program. CH 491 and CH 493 are offered in the fall semester; CH 492 and CH 494 are offered in the spring semester.

University Honors
CH
492
UH
Hours
1
Honors Research Sem

The course is designed for students in the Chemistry Department Honors Program. CH 491 and CH 493 are offered in the fall semester; CH 492 and CH 494 are offered in the spring semester.

University Honors
CH
493
UH
Hours
1
Honors Research Sem

The course is designed for students in the Chemistry Department Honors Program. CH 491 and CH 493 are offered in the fall semester; CH 492 and CH 494 are offered in the spring semester.

University Honors
CH
494
UH
Hours
1
Honors Research Sem

The course is designed for students in the Chemistry Department Honors Program. CH 491 and CH 493 are offered in the fall semester; CH 492 and CH 494 are offered in the spring semester.

University Honors
CH
497
Hours
1-3
Intro To Research

Three hours laboratory per credit hour. The student works on a research project under the direction of a chemistry faculty member. A final research report is required. CH 497 is offered in the fall; CH 498 is offered in the spring; and CH 499 is offered in the summer.

Prerequisite(s): CH 232 and CH 338 and CH 348 and CH 342
CH
498
Hours
1-3
Intro To Research

Three hours laboratory per credit hour. The student works on a research project under the direction of a chemistry faculty member. A final research report is required. CH 497 is offered in the fall; CH 498 is offered in the spring; and CH 499 is offered in the summer.

Prerequisite(s): CH 232 and CH 338 and CH 342 and CH 348
CH
499
Hours
1-3
Intro To Research

Three hours laboratory per credit hour. The student works on a research project under the direction of a chemistry faculty member. A final research report is required. CH 497 is offered in the fall; CH 498 is offered in the spring; and CH 499 is offered in the summer.

Prerequisite(s): CH 232 and CH 338 and CH 342 and CH 348
CHI
101
FL, HU
Hours
4
Elementary Chinese

Contemporary Chinese Language (Mandarin): speaking, listening, reading and writing of simplified Chinese characters. The class meets five hours per week with an instructor. This course is intended for students with NO PRIOR KNOWLEDGE of Chinese. Native speakers or near native speakers of the language are NOT allowed to enroll. Any students with background knowledge of this language must see the program director before enrolling.

Foreign Language, Humanities
CHI
102
FL, HU
Hours
4
Elementary Chinese

This is a continuation of Chinese language (Mandarin) on the elementary level. Course goals include stress on authentic reading and writing Chinese and a continuation of speaking with listening comprehension. The class meets five hours per week with an instructor. Native speakers or near native speakers of the language are NOT allowed to enroll.

Prerequisite(s): CHI 101
Foreign Language, Humanities
CHI
201
HU
Hours
3
Intermediate Chinese

This is a continuation of Chinese language on the intermediate level. Course goals include stress on reading and writing Chinese and a continuation of speaking with listening comprehension. Native speakers or near native speakers of the language are NOT allowed to enroll.

Prerequisite(s): CHI 101 and CHI 102
Humanities
CHI
202
HU
Hours
3
Intermediate Chinese

This is continuation of CHI 201. Emphasis on authentic Chinese reading and writing as well as culture. Native speakers or near native speakers of the language are NOT allowed to enroll.

Prerequisite(s): CHI 201
Humanities
CHI
301
Hours
3
Third-year Chinese

Study of contemporary Chinese language and culture. Emphasis is on the development of reading and writing skills in cultural context. Native speakers or near native speakers of the language are NOT allowed to enroll.

Prerequisite(s): CHI 202
CHI
302
Hours
3
Third-year Chinese

Continuation of CHI301. Study of contemporary Chinese language and culture. Native speakers or near native speakers of the language are NOT allowed to enroll.

Prerequisite(s): CHI 301
CHI
350
Hours
3
Traditional Chinese Lit Trans

Introduction to Chinese literature from the earliest times to the 20th century. No knowledge of Chinese is required.

CHI
351
Hours
3
Modern Chinese Lit Trans

Introduction to 20th-century Chinese literature. No knowledge of Chinese is required.

CHI
353
Hours
1-4
Conversation/Composition

This course is intended for students of the intermediate level Chinese. Classes emphasize communicative aspects of socially correct conversational skill as well as reading and writing of authentic contemporary Chinese (Mandarin).

Prerequisite(s): CHI 202
CHI
354
Hours
1-4
Conversation/Composition

Continuation of CHI353 with more emphasis on reading and writing of Chinese.

Prerequisite(s): CHI 353
CHI
401
Hours
3
Advanced Reading and Writing Chinese I

Advanced level Chinese. Emphasis on reading and writing of modern Chinese (Mandarin). Native speakers or near native speakers of the language are NOT allowed to enroll.

Prerequisite(s): CHI 302
CHI
402
Hours
3
Advanced Reading and Writing Chinese II

Continuation of CHI 401 for advanced students. Offered according to demand.

Prerequisite(s): CHI 401
CIP
101
Hours
2
International Student Success: WIN at UA

This course is designed for new and transfer international students. It will help them WIN at UA – through welcoming, integrating, and navigating a new academic and cultural experience. The course covers topics such as academic resources, honor code, academic misconduct, an overview of the U.S. higher education system and UA in particular, U.S. classroom culture, the cultural adjustment cycle and culture shock, strategies for successful integration into U.S. campus life, and student services resources.

Prerequisite(s): None.
CIP
200
HU
Hours
3
Introduction To Global Studies

Designed as the first course to be taken in the Global Studies Certificate Program (15 hours) to introduce the undergraduate student to the cultural, economic, physical and political aspects of being a world citizen in the 21st century. The emphasis of this course is the contemporary rather than the historical and will set the philosophy for the students' approach to the entire Global Studies Certificate curriculum, both core and emphasis-area courses.

Humanities
CIP
202
HU
Hours
3
Introduction to Global Studies: Experiential Learning

The increasing interconnectedness among people around the world is indisputable. As a society, we are increasingly aware of the way trends and processes reach beyond the confines of local, regional, and national boundaries. At UA’s Capstone International Center, we know that a 21st century citizen is certain to live a life that includes a variety of encounters with other cultures. It is our hope that you will take advantage of the many opportunities UA offers for intercultural engagement. And, this course has been designed to be one of those opportunities.

Prerequisite(s): None
Humanities
CIP
401
Hours
12
Out-Going Internation Exchange

No description available.

CIP
402
Hours
0
Abroad Experience

Non-credit Abroad Experience.

CIP
403
Hours
12
Out-Going Internation Exchange

No description available.

CIP
405
Hours
12
Out-Going Internation Exchange

No description available.

CIP
413
Hours
3-18
Cip Out-Going Enrollment

CIP out-going independent/direct enrollment, Study abroad student, graduate or undergraduate, in-state or out-of-state student.

CIP
420
Hours
12-16
UA Semester in London

UA semester in London program run through New College and Capstone International Academic Programs. Students live on the University of Roehampton campus and earn 12-16 credit hours.

CJ
100
SB
Hours
3
Intro Criminal Justice

An overview of the criminal justice system with emphasis on the roles and problems of law enforcement, courts, and correctional components. CJ 100 is a prerequisite for all 300- and 400-level criminal justice courses.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
CJ
220
Hours
3
Law Enforcement

Development of law enforcement; organization and jurisdiction of local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies; and functions of police officers.

CJ
221
Hours
3
Private Security

Organization and management of the security function in industry, business, and government. Exploration of methods to protect personnel, facilities, and other major assets: loss prevention, control, and risk management.

CJ
223
Hours
3
Homeland Security

The course will offer an overview of the United States Department of Homeland Security from its initiation to present day, and the wide range of issues that the department influences, both policy and operational. Additionally, how the United States Department of Homeland Security interacts with state, local, and tribal governments, or law enforcement agencies.

CJ
225
Hours
3
Community Based Corrections

A general overview and introduction to the complex world of Community Based Corrections offering a history and development of punishment and implementation of alternative sanctions.

CJ
230
Hours
3
Social Inequality in the Criminal Justice System

This course examines issues related to the oppression of people on the basis of their class, race, sex, gender, gender expression, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and physical or mental ability within the criminal justice system. It is designed to introduce the student to a range of issues of oppression and social and economic injustice pertinent to the field of criminology and how that affects offenders and others who interact with the criminal justice system.

CJ
240
Hours
3
Juvenile Delinquency

Extent and patterns of delinquency; its development in individuals and gangs; group therapy with delinquents; and juvenile courts, training schools, probation, and aftercare supervision.

CJ
250
Hours
3
Judicial Process

A general overview of U.S. judicial systems, including recent innovations and future trends.

CJ
270
Hours
3
Corrections

A general overview of U.S. corrections, jails and prisons, institutional procedures, recent innovations, and the future of corrections.

CJ
280
Hours
3
Research Methods

Theoretical and specific instruction in both the conduct and application of research methods in criminal justice settings. Includes problem of research and policy dimensions of both direct and applied approaches.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
290
Hours
3
Special Topics in Criminal Justice

Examination of selected problems and issues in Criminal Justice. A maximum of six hours may be use toward the major.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
300
Hours
3
Survey Criminal Theories

Study of traditional and modern explanations of crime and criminality.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
303
W
Hours
3
Race, Ethnicity, and Crime

Study of the role played by racial minorities at each stage of the criminal justice system. Special attention is devoted to theories and measurement of minority crimes and race relations and to the treatment of minorities by law enforcement officers, courts, and corrections.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
Writing
CJ
304
W
Hours
3
Gender and Crime

This course discusses and analyzes the differential experiences of women in the criminal justice system, focusing mostly on women offenders and victims, but also on hegemonic masculinity’s effect on crime. Special attention is given to feminist theoretical explanations of women’s experiences in the criminal justice system. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
Writing
CJ
306
W
Hours
3
History of Crime and Justice

Examination in historical sequence of the perspectives on and methods of crime control, from the traditional to the modern. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
Writing
CJ
330
Hours
3
Organization and Management Concepts in Criminal Justice

Formal organization theory and personnel administration, with emphasis on law enforcement agencies.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
381
Hours
3
Statistics

Statistical methods in criminal justice, including central tendency and dispersion, tests of significance, and measures of association.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100 and MATH 110 or MATH 112 or MATH 115 or MATH 125
CJ
395
Hours
1-12
Internship

An opportunity for students to conduct career exploration and build a record of experience in the field.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100 ***A maximum of 6 hours can be used toward the major.
CJ
408
Hours
3
Gendered Justice and the Death Penalty

This course is designed to introduce the student to gender and justice issues related to women sentenced to death. Using a series of field trips, guest speakers, videos, and case study analyses will explore the historical, social, political, and legal issues of serving time in female prisons. Special emphasis will be placed on female offenders who have been sentenced to death and those sentenced to life without parole. Also, gendered-related issues comparing the incarceration experiences of female death row inmates to the incarceration experiences of male death row inmates will be examined.

CJ
409
Hours
3
Women, Law, and Incarceration

The course examines the various issues that confront women who are incarcerated in state correctional institutions. Additionally, legal issues surrounding women's pathways to crime and their incarceration experiences will be explored.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
420
Hours
3
Seminar In Law Enforcement

Examines the philosophical basis of law enforcement and traces the development of the law enforcement function.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 220
CJ
421
Hours
3
Forensic Science

This course provides student with instruction in the fundamentals of criminal investigation from a forensic science perspective.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
422
Hours
3
Terrorism

An analysis of selected areas of terrorism and counter-terrorism, with an emphasis on parallels between terrorism and crime.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100 - Introduction to Criminal Justice
CJ
424
Hours
3
Hate Crimes

Adopting a multidisciplinary perspective, this course is designed to survey and critically evaluate various roots and consequences of, as well as contemporary issues involving, hate crimes. Topics are designed to expose the learner to various domains, facilitating a holistic perspective of hate crimes, as reflected by an integration of social science theory, empirical research, and criminal justice and legal practice.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
425
Hours
3
Domestic Violence

The course examines violence in the context of domestic situations. The types and causes of acts of domestic violence are explored in historical and contemporary context. Various intervention strategies and preventive measures are examined.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
426
Hours
3
White Collar Crime

This course provides a discussion of white-collar crime for the standpoint of criminological theory as well as criminal justice system policies, laws, and procedures.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
430
Hours
3
Drugs, Crime, and Policy

This course examines the current state of drug use, abuse, and trafficking in the United States and throughout the world. It critically examines drug-related topics, such as the history of drug use, patterns associated with drug trafficking organizations and drug-related markets, and both domestic and international drug-related policies.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
435
Hours
3
Global Perspectives on Crime and Justice

This course examines the variety of ways that criminal justice systems are organized and implemented around the world. Many times practitioners fail to recognize other approaches or points of focus that could improve the decision making process in particular and benefit the academic field in general. The social, cultural, and political background of different systems of justice will be introduced and discussed for an in-depth understanding.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
440
Hours
3
Seminar in Juvenile Delinquency

This course examines the problem of juvenile delinquency, exploring the kinds of criminal and delinquent behavior that young people engage in, the various ways academics and professionals have understood and explained such delinquent behavior, and the key institutional responses to the problem. To do this, we will draw on array of sources, including archival materials, historical accounts, case law, quantitative studies, ethnographic accounts, journalistic accounts, sociological, psychological, and criminological theories of delinquent behavior, and more. We will pay particular attention to some of the controversies in the fields concerned with juvenile delinquency, as well as some of the central dilemmas faced by professionals who work with delinquents.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100 CJ 240
CJ
450
Hours
3
Seminar In Judicial Process

Examines the philosophical basis of the American legal system and traces the development of the judicial process.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 250
CJ
460
Hours
3
Criminal Law I

Classification and analysis of selected areas of the substantive law of crimes, including basic principles of criminal law and crimes against the person and property.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
461
Hours
3
Criminal Law II

General principles and theories of criminal procedure, including concepts of due process, arrest, search and seizure, wiretapping, lineups, and other recent developments.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
470
Hours
3
Seminar In Corrections

History, analysis, and evaluation of American correctional institutions, including the sociology of confinement and reform movements within the system.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100 CJ 270
CJ
483
W
Hours
3
Law And Society

Law as an instrument of social control, the functions and limitations of law, and the machinery of law as a part of the larger society. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
Writing
CJ
490
Hours
3
Special Topics in Criminal Justice

Examination of selected problems and issues in criminal justice. A maximum of twelve hours may be used toward the major.

Prerequisite(s): CJ 100
CJ
499
Hours
1-6
Independent Study In CJ

Research under faculty supervision in any area of interest to the student.

Prerequisite(s): A maximum of 3 hours may be used toward the major or minor.
CL
222
HU
Hours
3
Greek Roman Mythology

Introduction to classical mythology itself and the principal Greek and Roman myths. Offered each semester.

Humanities
CL
234
HU
Hours
3
Medical Terminology

This course studies the Greek and Latin roots of medical terms, though knowing Greek or Latin is not a necessity. Students learn the meaning of a number of roots and, subsequently, become able to break down any medical term into its essential components (prefixes, suffixes and combining forms) and understand its meaning. Students also become able to relate any term to the body systems and understand how the biological nomenclature works. This course does not teach the medical practices described by the medical terms, but focuses on expanding student vocabulary not only in the medical field but also in related areas, as we learn derivatives used in other circumstances as well; an educated person is expected to be able to understand the medical language and communicate with his or her health providers. What makes this course invaluable is that the vocabulary students learn is often encountered on standardized tests such as GRE and MCAT.

Prerequisite(s): None
Humanities
CL
300
Hours
3
History of the Early Church

This course covers the main events, processes, figures and texts in the history of Christianity in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages The course begins with the introduction in which we will discuss the historical, social, and intellectual factors that influenced the development of early Christianity, its cultural connections with Judaism and Hellenism, and the appearance of the formative texts of Christianity. The subsequent lectures will be organized chronologically. The course also pays its due attention to the Byzantine Church and Eastern Christian traditions (Syriac, Coptic, Georgian, Armenian, Slavic, Arabic).

Prerequisite(s): None
CL
323
Hours
3
Alexander the Great, Then & Now

We will study the journey and conquests of Alexander the Great as a historical and cultural event. His expedition took him from Greece, through the countries of the Middle and Near East, all the way to India. Many Western leaders (including Americans) have tried to repeat Alexander's achievement with limited success. Our exploration will look at the reasons of subsequent failures, among other issues.

CL
333
HU
Hours
3-6
Greek Civilization: Myth, History, Culture

Greece is in a particularly strategic spot, at the crossroads between East and West, North and South, controlling the passages from Europe to Asia and from the Black Sea to the Mediterranean. A variety of cultures have crossed paths in Greece throughout its long history– from Egyptian, Minoan, and Roman to Byzantine, Christian, Muslim, Ottoman, and Jewish, have all left there their cultural marks. On the other hand, a variety of conquerors have attempted to control, subdue or obliterate the Greeks and Greek culture, yet have come and gone, while Greece and the Greeks are still there, having inhabited their land continuously for the past 4.5 millennia. In the course of time, the Greeks have developed a civilization with tremendous inventions, discoveries and advancements that changed the world and gave the West its identity. The Greeks do not claim to have invented the wheel, but to have used it in order to give the world theater, history, medicine, philosophy, the Golden Mean, geometry, levers and pulley systems, the first analog computers and, above all, democracy. This course, therefore, taught in Greece, takes place at the most significant historical sites throughout the country. Instruction includes various three elements: (i) Students learn about the myths and legends associated with each site and study the geographical features of the area that gave rise to them; (ii) visit the archeological site and are introduced to the history of the area from the Archaic Period to the Modern Era, following the trail of material remains both at the site and the museum; and (iii) study the elements of the modern culture that derive from antiquity, uncovering the continuity of Greek civilization. In this way, students get an overview of Greek history and culture from prehistory to modernity, which brings to life not only myths and legends but also historic events that shaped Western civilization.

Prerequisite(s): None
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: Students must enroll in CL 380-800 for 6 credit hours.
Humanities
CL
350
W
Hours
3
Roman Religion

Survey of the rites and structure of ancient Roman cult with special emphasis on the Roman religious calendar and the clash between paganism and Christianity. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
CL
365
Hours
3
Greece & Rome in Film

This course integrates literature, history, and film. Many of the films we watch attempt to reconstruct the ancient world to some degree of accuracy, while others are inspired by themes of ancient literature, but without regard to historic authenticity. Students read several primary sources to help them discern inauthentic elements or appreciate good interpretations in film.

CL
380
Hours
3-6
Special Topics

Detailed investigations of specific aspects of Greco-Roman civilization such as ancient drama, women's lives, ancient religion, and technological achievements.

CL
384
Hours
3
Ancient Egypt Near East

Introduction to Egypt's ancient history (from the pyramids to the Ptolemies), with emphasis on the civilization's contributions to Western heritage.

CL
385
Hours
3
History Of Greece

Survey of the history of Greece from earliest times to the death of Alexander the Great, with emphasis on the Golden Age.

CL
386
Hours
3
History Of Rome

Introduction to the ancient history of Rome, with emphasis on the Republic from its Etruscan beginnings to the Second Punic War, and on the golden age of Caesar Augustus at the beginning of the Roman Empire.

CRL
101
Hours
1-6
Elementary Critical Language I

This course is for students studying any beginning level of less commonly taught languages offered by the Critical Languages Center or abroad, and repeatable for credit with different languages. Supervised self-study system applied.

CRL
102
Hours
1-6
Elem. Critical Language II

This course is equivalent to the second semester level of less commonly taught languages at the Critical Language Center or abroad, and repeatable with different languages. Supervised self-study system applied.

CRL
201
Hours
1-6
Int. Critical Language I

This course is equivalent to the third semester level of a less commonly taught language at the Critical Languages Center or abroad, and repeatable for credit with different less commonly taught languages. Supervised self-study system applied.

CRL
202
Hours
1-6
Int. Critical Languages II

This course is equivalent to the fourth semester level of less commonly taught languages at the Critical Languages Center or abroad, and repeatable for credit with different less commonly taught languages.

CRL
301
Hours
1-6
3rd Year Critical Lang. I

This course is for students who have completed four semesters of a less commonly taught language and wish to pursue a higher level of language proficiency. Language proficiency must be evaluated as adequate for this level by the Critical Languages Center, and the consent of the CLC director is required.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor Required
CRL
302
Hours
1-6
3rd Year Critical Lang. II

This course is a continuation of CRL 301, and for students wish to pursue a higher level of language proficiency. Language proficiency must be evaluated as adequate for this level by the Critical Languages Center before enrolling, and the consent of the CLC director is required.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor Required
CROA
101
Hours
3
Elem Croatian Language

Contemporary Croatian: speaking, reading, and writing. Course involves directed-self-instructional approach in the Critical Languages Center. Students are required to study the textbook and practice with assigned audio visual materials (CDs, DVDs, or computer files). Students have practice sessions three hours per week with a “language trainer” who is a native/near native (or superior level) speaker of the language. Native speakers of this language cannot take this course. Any students with background knowledge of this language must see the CLC director before registering for permission. Not repeatable without permission of the CLC director. Offered each semester.

CROA
102
Hours
3
Elem Croatian Language

Contemporary Croatian: speaking, reading, and writing. Course involves directed-self-instructional approach in the Critical Languages Center. Students are required to study the textbook and practice with assigned audio visual materials (CDs, DVDs, or computer files). Students have practice sessions three hours per week with a “language trainer” who is a native/near native speaker of the language. Not repeatable without permission of the CLC director. Offered each semester.

DN
110
Hours
2
Intro To Dance Styles

Introduction to ballet, modern, and jazz dance through theory and practice at the beginning level.

DN
111
Hours
3
Modern Dance Technique I

This course will introduce the basics of modern dance techniques.

DN
121
Hours
3
Ballet Technique I-A

A studio course in classical ballet for first year dance majors or musical theatre majors.

DN
122
Hours
3
Ballet Technique I-B

The development of theory and practice of classical ballet for first year dance majors or students with some previous experience in ballet.

DN
142
Hours
2
World Dance

An introduction to dance movement as influenced by various cultures.

DN
151
Hours
3
Jazz Technique I

Introduction to jazz dance technique and style through dance studio work.

DN
200
Hours
3
Special Topics

Investigation of dance theories and principles.

DN
210
Hours
3
Dance Styles II

This course will include study of various dance styles at the intermediate level in order to prepare the musical theatre student for more advanced study. Students will be taught dance combinations from musical theatre repertoire in order to enhance technical skills while preparing for performance. The history and development of musical theatre dance will also be explored. Musical Theatre majors only or permission of the instructor.

DN
211
Hours
3
Modern Dance II-A

A studio course in modern dance techniques at the intermediate level. Dance majors only.

DN
212
Hours
3
Modern Dance II-B

A studio course in modern dance technique at the advanced intermediate level. Dance majors only.

DN
221
Hours
3
Ballet Technique II-A

Development of classical ballet technique, and performance quality at the intermediate level for dance majors. Dance majors only.

DN
222
Hours
3
Ballet Technique II-B

Development of the classical theory and practice of ballet, at the advanced intermediate level. Dance majors only.

DN
251
Hours
3
Jazz Technique II-A

A studio course in jazz dance technique at the intermediate level. Dance majors only.

DN
252
Hours
3
Jazz Technique II-B

A studio course in jazz dance technique at a more advanced intermediate level. Dance majors only.

DN
290
Hours
1
Dance Practicum

This course provides for participation in departmental dance productions in the form of working on dance shows in a capacity other than performing.

DN
300
Hours
1-3
Special Topics

Study of dance theories and principles for performance,choreography or pedagogy. Permission of instructor.

DN
301
Hours
1-3
Special Topics II

This course will focus on one area of dance such as technique, repertoire, composition or pedagogy in order to facilitate a more advanced analysis of that specific area.

DN
310
Hours
3
Dance Styles III

Continued exploration of musical theatre dance technique and style at a more advanced level. Students will learn movement covering a wide range of musical theatre eras and styles, with a focus on learning material quickly. For Musical Theatre majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.

Prerequisite(s): DN 210
DN
311
Hours
3
Modern Dance Technique III-A

Development of modern dance technique at the advanced level. Dance Majors or permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): DN 211 or DN 212
DN
312
Hours
3
Modern Dance Technique III-B

Continued development of advanced modern dance technique. Dance Majors or permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): DN 211 or DN 212
DN
321
Hours
3
Ballet Technique III-A

Development of ballet technique at the advanced level. Includes ladies' pointe work and men's technique.

Prerequisite(s): DN221 or DN222
DN
322
Hours
3
Ballet Technique III-B

Continued development of ballet technique at the advanced level. Includes ladies' pointe work and men's technique.

Prerequisite(s): DN221 or DN222
DN
351
Hours
3
Jazz Technique III-A

Development of jazz dance technique at the advanced level. Dance Majors or permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): DN 251 or DN 252
DN
352
Hours
3
Jazz Technique III-B

Continued development of jazz dance technique at the advanced level. Dance Majors or permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): DN 251 or DN 252
DN
380
Hours
3
Independent Study In Dance

No description available.

DN
381
Hours
3
Indep Study In Dance

No description available.

DN
400
Hours
3
Special Topics

Prepare dancers for a professional career in dance performance through the rehearsal process of learning and performing, ballet, modern and jazz dance repertoire.

DN
410
Hours
3
Advanced Tap Technique

An advanced course focusing on tap dance language and the execution of advanced tap technique.

Prerequisite(s): DN 210 and DN 310
DN
411
Hours
3
Modern Dance Technique IV-A

Development of modern dance technique at the advanced level, preparing the student for professional work.

Prerequisite(s): DN 311 or DN 312
DN
412
Hours
3
Modern Dance Technique IV-B

Continued development of advanced modern dance technique, preparing the student for professional work.

Prerequisite(s): DN 311 or DN 312
DN
421
Hours
3
Ballet Technique IV-A

Advanced ballet technique including study of ballet repertoire in preparation for professional work. For dance majors.

Prerequisite(s): DN 321 or DN 322
DN
422
Hours
3
Ballet Technique IV-B

Continued development of advanced ballet technique and repertoire in preparation for professional work. For dance majors.

Prerequisite(s): DN 321 or DN 322
DN
451
Hours
3
Jazz Technique IV-A

Development of jazz dance technique at the advanced/pre-professional level. Will focus on elements of technique and style for concert, commercial, and musical theatre jazz.

Prerequisite(s): DN 351 or DN 352
DN
452
Hours
3
Jazz Technique IV-B

Continued development of jazz dance technique at the advanced/pre-professional level. Special attention will be given to developing performance qualities.

Prerequisite(s): DN 351 or DN 352
DNCA
240
Hours
3
Choreography I

Basic exploration of the rhythmic and spatial elements in the development of movement phrases and choreographic dance studies. Dance Majors only or permission of instructor.

DNCA
265
Hours
3
Introduction to Anatomy and Kinesiology For Dance

Lecture/studio course covering the basics of the musculoskeletal system and kinesiology with an emphasis on dance. Dance majors only.

DNCA
302
Hours
1-3
Special Topics in Dance

This course will investigate the possibilities for synthesizing elements of dance technique and dance academics to facilitate success in the professional dance industry.

DNCA
320
Hours
3
Composition, Movement, and the Camera

This is a composition course for the camera with an emphasis on capturing human movement. The class begins with instruction in basic camera and digital editing skills. In a series of studies for the camera that culminate in a final project, students develop a compositional vocabulary, taking into consideration, choreography, sound, and visual composition. Students’ compositional understanding will be expanded by video-viewing, reading, and discussion. Students with an interest in dance, visual art, theatre, experimental filmmaking, and music are encouraged to enroll.

DNCA
340
Hours
3
Choreography II

Exploration in more complex choreographic forms and compositions. Dance majors only.

Prerequisite(s): DNCA 240 or DN 240
DNCA
350
Hours
1-3
Creative Processes in Dance

This course explores creative processes in various dance styles. Students will research their chosen subject matter with a public presentation as the culmination of the class. Dance Majors or permission of the instructor only.

Prerequisite(s): DNCA240
DNCA
403
Hours
3
Approach Dance Instructn

This course is a service-learning course developing techniques for teaching movement concepts. This course includes a practicum component teaching dance to elementary students in the public schools. Dance Majors or permission of the instructor.

Prerequisite(s): DNCA 265 or DN 265
DNCA
420
Hours
3
Dance and the Camera

Dance and the Camera will introduce students to the videographic, choreographic, and editing skills involved in making dances for the screen. Students will work both in front of and behind the camera to create studies and final projects. Through lecture, reading, video-viewing and discussions, the class will also explore the history of screendance and its current trends. Dance majors or permission of instructor.

Prerequisite(s): DNCA 240 Choreography I
DNCA
440
Hours
3
Choreography III

A study and practice of choreographic composition at the advanced level including all aspects of production. Offered on demand.

Prerequisite(s): DNCA 340 or DN 340; and TH 324
DNCA
470
W
Hours
3
History Of Dance I

The history of dance from pre-classic, romantic, classical and early modern ballet. Dance majors only. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
DNCA
471
W
Hours
3
History of Dance II

The history of dance with an emphasis on 20th century and contemporary dance styles. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course. Dance Majors only.

Prerequisite(s): DNCA 470
Writing
DUT
102
Hours
3
Elementary Dutch

Contemporary Dutch: speaking, reading, and writing. Course involves directed-self-instructional approach in the Critical Languages Center. Students are required to study the textbook and practice with assigned audio visual materials (CDs, DVDs, or computer files). Students have practice sessions three hours per week with a “language trainer” who is a native/near native/superior-level speaker of the language. Not repeatable without permission of the CLC director.

Prerequisite(s): DUT 101
EN
101
FC
Hours
3
English Composition

Introduction to college-level expository writing, critical reading, basic citation, and the rhetorical tools needed to participate successfully in the University of Alabama discourse community. Grades are reported as A, B, C, or NC (No Credit). A grade of C- or higher is required as a prerequisite for advancing to another English course at The University of Alabama. Offered each semester and in summer school. EN 101 does not apply as credit to the English major or minor.

Freshmen Composition
EN
102
FC
Hours
3
English Composition

Intermediate college-level writing covering the principles of argumentation, advanced critical thinking and analysis, university-level research techniques, and research-paper writing. Grades are reported as A, B, C, or NC (No Credit). A grade of C- or higher is required as a prerequisite for advancing to another English course at The University of Alabama. Offered each semester and in summer school. EN 102 does not apply as credit to the English major or minor. Prerequisite(s): EN 101.

Prerequisite(s): EN 101
Freshmen Composition
EN
103
FC, UH
Hours
3
Advanced English Composition

This is an accelerated freshman composition course that is open to students with minimum scores of 28 ACT Composite or 1350 SAT, or minimum ACT English scores of 30 or SAT verbal scores of 730. With the appropriate qualifying scores and the completion of EN 103 with a grade of C- or higher, placement credit is awarded for EN 101 and the general education requirement for freshman composition is completed. Covers argumentation, advanced critical thinking and analysis, university-level research techniques, and research-paper writing. Course themes are determined by each instructor. Grades are reported as A, B, C, or NC (No Credit). A grade of C- is required as a prerequisite for advancing to another English course at The University of Alabama. EN 103 does not apply as credit to the English major or minor.

Prerequisite(s): 28 ACT composite or 1350 SAT OR ACT English score of 30 or SAT verbal score of 730
Freshmen Composition, University Honors
EN
104
FC, UH
Hours
3
English Composition BUI

For students in Blount Undergraduate Initiative. Covers argumentation, advanced critical thinking and analysis, university-level research techniques, and research-paper writing. Grades are reported as “A,” “B,” “C,” or “NC” (“No Credit”). This course substitutes for either EN 103 Advanced Composition or EN 101 Freshman Composition I. Students who qualify for EN 103 (see EN 103 description above) are awarded an additional 3 hours of composition placement credit with a grade of “pass” upon successful completion of EN 104. Other students receive the same credit if they earn a grade of “A-” or higher. Students who earn a grade lower than “A-” are required to take three additional hours of freshman composition, generally EN 102. Students who have credit for EN 101 and EN 102 either from another institution or through AP or IB placement do not take EN 104. EN 104 does not apply as credit to the English major or minor.

Freshmen Composition, University Honors
EN
120
FC
Hours
3
English Comp I Non-Native Spkr

The first in a two-course sequence, EN 120 introduces non-native English speakers to college-level expository writing, critical reading, basic citation, and the rhetorical tools needed to participate successfully in the University of Alabama discourse community. Special attention will be paid to the unique linguistic and cultural needs of students whose native language is not English. Offered every semester.

Freshmen Composition
EN
121
FC
Hours
3
English Comp II Non-Native Spk

The second course in UA's first-year sequence in composition, EN 121 introduces non-native English speakers to the principles of formal argumentation, advanced critical thinking and analysis, university-level research techniques, and research-paper writing. Special attention will be paid to the unique linguistic and cultural needs of students whose native language is not English. Offered each semester.

Prerequisite(s): EN 120
Freshmen Composition
EN
200
FA
Hours
3
The Living Writer: Introduction to Creative Writing

Introduction to the craft of imaginative writing, the landscape of contemporary literature, and the writer as artist. Students will engage UA’s literary arts culture and regularly attend readings and author events.

Prerequisite(s): EN 101 or EN 120
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: EN 102 or EN 103 or EN 104 or EN 121
Fine Arts
EN
201
HU
Hours
3
How English Works

This course will introduce students to the wide-ranging discipline of linguistics that incorporates aspects of both the humanities and the social sciences. Students will explore the elements from which languages are composed, examine differences across languages, and see how linguistic data and methods are brought to bear on real-world issues in the realms of psychology, literary studies, sociology, education, and the judicial system. Language will be presented as a constantly changing phenomenon that is embedded in culture and steeped in ideology.

Prerequisite(s): EN 101 and EN 102, or EN 103
Humanities
EN
205
HU, L
Hours
3
English Literature I

Survey of English literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to 1800, including, Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Milton.

Prerequisite(s): EN 101 and EN 102; or EN 103; or EN 104; or EN 120 and EN 121
Humanities, Literature
EN
206
HU, L
Hours
3
English Literature II

Survey of English literature from 1800 to the present, including, works from the Romantic, Victorian, and Modern eras.

Prerequisite(s): EN 101 and EN 102; or EN 103; or EN 104; or EN 120 and EN 121
Humanities, Literature
EN
207
HU, L
Hours
3
World Literature I

Survey of world literature from the Classical period to the Renaissance.

Prerequisite(s): EN 101 and EN 102; or EN 103; or EN 104; or EN 120 and EN 121
Humanities, Literature
EN
208
HU, L
Hours
3
World Literature II

Survey of world literature from the Enlightenment to the Modern period.

Prerequisite(s): EN 101 and EN 102; or EN 103; or EN 104; or EN 120 and EN 121
Humanities, Literature
EN
209
HU, L
Hours
3
American Literature

Survey of American literature from its beginnings to 1865, including, work by Poe, Thoreau, Emerson, Melville, and Whitman, among others.

Prerequisite(s): EN 101 and EN 102; or EN 103; or EN 104; or EN 120 and EN 121
Humanities, Literature
EN
210
HU, L
Hours
3
American Literature II

Survey of American literature from 1865 to the present, including, work by Dickinson, Twain, Hemingway, Faulkner, and Morrison.

Prerequisite(s): EN 101 and EN 102; or EN 103; or EN 104; or EN 120 and EN 121
Humanities, Literature
EN
215
HU, L, UH
Hours
3
Honors English Literature I

Honors section of EN 205.

Prerequisite(s): EN 101 and EN 102; or EN 103; or EN 104; or EN 120 and EN 121
Humanities, Literature, University Honors
EN
216
HU, L, UH
Hours
3
Honors English Literature II

Honors section of EN 206.

Prerequisite(s): EN 101 and EN 102; or EN 103; or EN 104; or EN 120 and EN 121
Humanities, Literature, University Honors
EN
219
HU, L, UH
Hours
3
Honors American Literature

Honors section of EN 209.

Prerequisite(s): EN 101 and EN 102; or EN 103; or EN 104; or EN 120 and EN 121
Humanities, Literature, University Honors
EN
220
HU, L, UH
Hours
3
Honors American Literature II

Honors section of EN 210.

Prerequisite(s): EN 101 and EN 102; or EN 103; or EN 104; or EN 120 and EN 121
Humanities, Literature, University Honors
EN
249
HU, L
Hours
3
African American Literature I

Survey of African American literature from its earliest expressions to 1935. The course material includes spirituals, slave narratives, poetry, drama, autobiography, fiction, and nonfiction.

Prerequisite(s): EN 101 and EN 102; or EN 103; or EN 104; or EN 120 and EN 121
Humanities, Literature
EN
250
HU, L
Hours
3
African American Literature II

Survey of African American literature from 1935 to the present. The course material includes poetry, drama, autobiography, fiction, and nonfiction.

Prerequisite(s): EN 101 and EN 102; or EN 103; or EN 104; or EN 120 and EN 121
Humanities, Literature
EN
300
Hours
3
Intro To English Studies

An introduction for English majors to the methods employed in the discipline of English. Students will be exposed to the fundamental issues of critical reading, interpretation, and writing, especiall to the use of critical methods in the study of primary texts. Readings will include a selection of texts in the traditional categories of poetry, drama, and prose, as well as the genre of the critical essay. There may also be investigations into other genres and media.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
301
Hours
3
Prose Tour

Study of basic principles of composing creative prose. Reading and assigned writing experiments in a broad range of prose forms. Required of all creative writing minors.

Prerequisite(s): EN 200
EN
303
Hours
3
Poetry Tour

Study of basic principles of composing poetry. Reading and assigned writing experiments in a broad range of poetic forms. Required of all creative writing minors.

Prerequisite(s): EN 200
EN
309
W
Hours
3
Advanced Expository Writing

Study and practice in methods of exposition, explanation and explication, logic and persuasion, definition and analogy, analysis and evaluation. Enrollment is limited to 15. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
Writing
EN
310
Hours
3
Special Topics Writing

Topics vary from semester to semester; examples are legal writing, writing about the social sciences and reading and writing in cyberspace. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
311
Hours
3
Special Topics In Literature

Topics vary from semester to semester and may include courses offered by other departments. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
317
Hours
3
Writing Center Practicum

An introduction to the history, theory and practice of Writing Centers. Students completing the course can apply for positions on the Writing Center staff.

Prerequisite(s): None.
EN
319
W
Hours
3
Technical Writing

Focuses on principles and practices of technical writing, including audience analysis, organization and planning, information design and style, usability testing, and collaborative writing. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): EN 101 and EN 102; or EN 103; or EN 104; or EN 120 and EN 121
Writing
EN
320
Hours
3
Intro To Linguistics

Introduction to the study of language, including subjects such as language acquisition, variation, and origins. The system of sounds, syntax, and meaning are illustrated in English and other languages. Prerequisite for EN 423, EN 424, EN 425, EN 466.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
321
Hours
3
Linguis Approach English Gramr

A study of English grammar integrating principles from linguistic theory with structural approaches to grammar. The course includes a focus on the expectations of grammatical usage in different contexts and an understanding of how to apply this knowledge in a pedagogical setting. This course is a prerequisite for EN 423, EN 424, EN 425, EN 466.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
329
Hours
1-3
Directed Studies

Prerequisite: Enrollment only by previous arrangement with a specific instructor and with the permission of the director of undergraduate English studies. A reading list and a draft syllabus are required. Please see the departmental website for more information. EN 329 may be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
330
Hours
3
Chaucer And Medieval Literatur

Examines works of the Old and Middle English Periods, the formative years of British literature. Works from pre-conquest England may include Beowulf, Bede's History of the English Church, and poems from the Exeter and Vercelli manuscripts. The major works from the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries may include Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, William Langland's Piers Plowman, John Gower's Confessio Amantis, and Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde and the Canterbury Tales.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
331
Hours
3
Chaucer

Introduction to the works of Chaucer. This course includes a study of Chaucer's language as well as the 14th-century milieu.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
332
Hours
3
Sixteenth Century Literature

A cross-genre survey of the literature of the Elizabethan period. Authors may include Sir Thomas More, Sir Thomas Wyatt, Sir Philip Sidney, Sir Walter Raleigh, Edmund Spenser, Aemilia Lanyer, Christopher Marlowe, and William Shakespeare.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
333
Hours
3
Shakespeare

An introduction to Shakespeare's plays and poems. Elizabethan customs, politics, history, and philosophies are examined in relation to his works.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
334
Hours
3
Seventeenth Century Literature

A cross-genre survey of literature in English from 1603 to 1660. Authors may include John Donne, Ben Jonson, Francis Bacon, John Webster, Lady Mary Wroth, William Bradford, Anne Bradstreet, and Andrew Marvell.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
335
Hours
3
Milton

An introduction to Milton's English poetry along with the history, politics, aesthetics, philosophy, and theology of seventeenth-century England. Typically devotes approximately half the semester to a close reading of Paradise Lost.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
340
Hours
3
American Literature To 1900

A cross-genre survey of American literature from its beginnings to 1900. Authors may include Mary Rowlandson, Cotton Mather, Phillis Wheatley, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Frederick Douglass, Henry James, and Mark Twain.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
341
Hours
3
American Poetry To 1900

A survey of American poetry from its beginnings to 1900. Authors may include Anne Bradstreet, Edward Taylor, Edgar Allan Poe, Walt Whitman, and Emily Dickinson.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
342
Hours
3
American Fiction To 1900

A survey of the development of American fiction from its beginnings to 1900, with attention to both the novel and the short story. Authors may include James Fenimore Cooper, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Herman Melville, Mark Twain, and Kate Chopin.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
343
Hours
3
British Fiction To 1900

A survey of developments in British fiction from its beginnings to 1900. Authors may include Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, and George Eliot.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
344
Hours
3
Major Authors 1660-1900

Limited to a maximum of three authors. Attention to the national literatures of Britain and America, and to different genres of prose, drama, and poetry, will vary from semester to semester. Authors may include John Milton, Alexander Pope, Jane Austen, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Herman Melville, Frederick Douglass, and Emily Dickinson.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
347
Hours
3
English Lit During Enlightenmt

A cross-genre survey of English literature during the period 1660-1800. Authors may include John Locke, John Bunyan, Mary Astell, Jonathan Swift, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, Samuel Johnson, Hester Thrale, and James Boswell.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
348
Hours
3
Romantic Literature

A cross-genre survey of British Romantic writers such as William Blake, Jane Austen, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Lord Byron, John Keats, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and Mary Shelley.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
349
Hours
3
Victorian Literature

A survey of the genres, authors, and issues in British literature, 1832-1900. Authors may include Thomas Carlyle, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Matthew Arnold, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Christina Rossetti, and Oscar Wilde.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
350
Hours
3
Topics in African American Lit

A cross-genre survey of African American literature, historical events, and critical movements. Authors may include Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Richard Wright, Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larson, Langston Hughes, and Toni Morrison.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
360
Hours
3
Topics American Lit 1900-1945

A cross-genre survey of major literary figures, critical movements, historical events, and significant texts within the first half of the twentieth century in America. Authors may include Henry James, Mark Twain, Edith Wharton, W.E.B. Du Bois, Gertrude Stein, Countee Cullen, Eugene O'Neill, and Wallace Stevens.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
361
Hours
3
Top American Lit 1945-Present

A cross-genre survey of major literary figures, critical movements, historical events, and significant texts since the Second World War in America. Authors may include Langston Hughes, Arthur Miller, James Baldwin, Norman Mailer, Toni Morrison, Sam Shepherd, Adrienne Rich, and John Ashbery.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
362
Hours
3
Topics British Lit 1900-1945

A cross-genre survey of major literary figures, critical movements, historical events, and significant texts within the first half of the twentieth century in Britain. Authors may include Joseph Conrad, George Bernard Shaw, W. B. Yeats, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, Katherine Mansfield, and T. S. Eliot.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
363
Hours
3
Top British Lit 1945-Present

A cross-genre survey of major literary figures, critical movements, historical events, and significant texts since the Second World War in England. Authors may include Samuel Beckett, W. H. Auden, Doris Lessing, Seamus Heaney, Harold Pinter, and Jeanette Winterson.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
364
Hours
3
Modern Drama

A survey of the major American, British, European and African plays from the 19th and 20th centuries. Authors may include Eugene O'Neill, Tennessee Williams, Ntozake Shange, Oscar Wilde, Harold Pinter, Tom Stoppard, August Strindberg, Anton Chekhov, Wole Soyinka and Athol Fugard.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
365
Hours
3
Modern American Fiction

A survey of American fiction (novels and short stories) written in the 20th century. Authors may include F. Scott Fitzgerald, Willa Cather, William Faulkner, Toni Morrison, N. Scott Momaday and Leslie Marmon Silko.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
366
Hours
3
Twentieth Century Poetry

A survey of major authors and trends in modern poetry in America, Britain, and the larger Anglophone world, as poetry in English became an international phenomenon. Attention will be paid to modernist and post-modernist poetry movements, American regionalisms, war poetry, and the poetry of neocolonial experiences.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
367
Hours
3
Postcolonial and Global Anglophone Literature

A cross-genre survey of the literature of Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean. Authors may include Olaudah Equiano, Rabindranath Tagore, Chinua Achebe, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Aminatta Forna, Derek Walcott, V.S. Naipaul, Amitav Ghosh, J.M Coetzee, Bessie Head, Anita Desai, and Arundhati Roy.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
368
Hours
3
Modern British Fiction

A survey of the twentieth-century novels and short stories produced by leading British and Irish writers. Authors may include James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, George Orwell, Iris Murdoch, A. S. Byatt, Martin Amis, V.S. Naipaul, Edna O'Brien, and J.M. Coetzee.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
370
Hours
3
Comedy

A cross-genre survey of comic literature that may begin with the classical ideas of comedy and proceed through the present. This course, like comedy itself, will focus on individuals as they come to accept the idea that life can truly be a feast (Greek, Comos). This course considers changing conceptions of comedy whether in fiction, poetry, or drama.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
371
Hours
3
Tragedy

A cross-genre survey of tragic literature that may begin with the classical tragedians and proceed through the present. This course, like tragedy itself, will focus on the individual confronting the larger forces of society, god, or fate. This course considers changing conceptions of the tragic whether in fiction, poetry, or drama.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
373
Hours
3
Women In Literature

A survey of British and American literature written by and/or about women. Authors may include a cross-genre range from Anne Bradstreet and Fanny Burney to Toni Morrison and Louise Erdrich.

Prerequisite(s): 12 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level.
EN
399
UH
Hours
3
Honors Seminar in English

Covers selected topics in English that vary from year to year. Topics are most likely to be thematic and to cut across conventional divisions of literary period and literary form. Required for departmental honors.

Prerequisite(s): EN 215 or EN 216 or EN 219 or EN 220
University Honors
EN
400
Hours
3
Senior Seminar

Senior Seminar.

Prerequisite(s): 18 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level, and 6 hours at the 300-level.
EN
408
Hours
3
Advanced Creative Writing

Special topics in imaginative writing. Focus may be on poetry, fiction, non fiction or a combination. Students produce imaginative writing and read related texts. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours.

Prerequisite(s): EN 200 and EN 301 and EN 303
EN
411
W
Hours
3
Adv Stdy Comptv Multi-Cutl Lit

Designed for advanced English majors, a special topics course that focuses on issues involving comparative literatures and/or cultural studies. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course. EN 411 may be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours.

Prerequisite(s): 18 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level, and 6 hours at the 300-level.
Writing
EN
422
W
Hours
3
Adv Studies Americ Literature

Designed for advanced English majors, a special topics course that focuses on issues in American literature. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course. EN 422 may be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours.

Prerequisite(s): 18 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level, and 6 hours at the 300-level.
Writing
EN
423
Hours
3
History of the English Language

An introduction to the external history of the English language along with the study of the accompanying internal changes in structure.

Prerequisite(s): EN 320 OR EN 321 OR ANT 210 OR ANT 401 OR ANT 450 OR FR 361 OR IT 361 OR SP 361
EN
424
Hours
3
Structure Of English

Advanced study of the structure and usage of the English language, focusing on issues of morphology, syntax, and discourse context. Offered each fall semester.

Prerequisite(s): EN 320 OR EN 321 OR ANT 210 OR ANT 401 OR ANT 450 OR FR 361 OR IT 361 OR SP 361
EN
425
Hours
3
Variation in American English

The study of the experience of the English language in America with particular emphasis on its development and dialects.

Prerequisite(s): EN 320 OR EN 321 OR ANT 210 OR ANT 401 OR ANT 450 OR FR 361 OR IT 361 OR SP 361
EN
429
Hours
3
Directed Readings

Prerequisite: Enrollment only by previous arrangement with a specific instructor and with the permission of the director of undergraduate English studies. EN 429 may be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.

Prerequisite(s): 18 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level, and 6 hours at the 300-level.
EN
430
Hours
3-6
English Internship

An on- or off-campus training position in which students use the skills they have gained as English majors and enhance their employment opportunities after graduation. Interns work approximately 10 hours a week, holding responsible positions with, among others, Alabama Heritage, Alabama Alumni Magazine, and the Tuscaloosa Public Defender's Office. Apply to the director of undergraduate studies in the Department of English. Please see the departmental website for the application form and further details. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours.

Prerequisite(s): 18 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level, and 6 hours at the 300-level.
EN
433
W
Hours
3
Advanced Studies British Lit

Designed for advanced English majors, a special topics course that focuses on issues in British literature. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course. EN 433 can be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours.

Prerequisite(s): 18 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level, and 6 hours at the 300-level.
Writing
EN
444
W
Hours
3
Adv Stdy Literary Crit/Theory

Designed for advanced English majors, a special topics course that focuses on issues involving literary criticism and critical theory. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course. This course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours.

Prerequisite(s): 18 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level, and 6 hours at the 300-level.
Writing
EN
455
W
Hours
3
Advanced Studies In Writing

Designed for advanced English majors, a special topics course that focuses on the process of writing. The forms this writing may take include, but are not limited to, film, creative non-fiction, autobiography, and local color. May be repeated a maximum of 9 hours. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
EN
456
Hours
3
Writing Center Theory and Research

This course augments the professional practice of Writing Center staff with assigned readings, writing assignments, and discussions. Theory and research intensive.

Prerequisite(s): None.
EN
466
W
Hours
3
Advanced Studies In Linguistics

Designed for English majors, a special topics course that focuses on issues in linguistics. A frequent topic is language and culture. This course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours.

Prerequisite(s): EN 320 OR EN 321 OR ANT 210 OR ANT 401 OR ANT 450 OR FR 361 OR IT 361 OR SP 361
Writing
EN
477
W
Hours
3
Adv Studies Literary Genres

Designed for advanced English majors, a special topics course that focuses on issues in genre criticism. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course. This course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours.

Prerequisite(s): 18 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level, and 6 hours at the 300-level.
Writing
EN
488
W
Hours
3
Adv Stdy African American Lit

Designed for the advanced English major, a special topics course that focuses on issues in African American literature. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): 18 hours in English, including 6 hours at the 200-level, and 6 hours at the 300-level.
Writing
EN
499
UH, W
Hours
3
Honors Thesis

The Honors Thesis in English course is an individualized, directed readings class that culminates in a 30-50 pp. thesis. It is the final required course for the Honors in English program. Each student enrolled will work individually with a faculty mentor.

Prerequisite(s): EN 399
University Honors, Writing
EXD
100
Hours
0
Continuous Enrollment

This is a place holder in the system so that distance students can use library and tech services throughout the academic year.

EXD
101
Hours
3
Foundatns Adult Learning

Orientation to the EXD Program and introduction to the theories and principles of adult learning, learning styles, college degree planning, college writing, and selected issues relating to adult education. Mandatory for admission to the EXD Program.

EXD
200
Hours
0
Prior Learning Portfolio Devel

Prior Learning Portfolio Dev.

EXD
205
Hours
0
Prior Learning Assessment

Prior Learning Assessment.

EXD
300
Hours
1-12
Directed Study

Out-of-class learning contracts designed by students in selected topics. Advisor approval required.

EXD
320
Hours
1-15
Contract Learning

No description available.

EXD
330
Hours
1-15
Contract Learning

No description available.

EXD
345
Hours
1-15
Contract Learning

No description available.

EXD
350
Hours
1-15
Contract Learning

No description available.

EXD
355
Hours
1-15
Contract Learning

No description available.

EXD
360
Hours
1-15
Contract Learning

No description available.

EXD
395
Hours
1-6
Seminar

Campus-based seminar on varying topics in natural sciences, humanities, social sciences, or other selected areas.

EXD
400
Hours
1-4
Seminar Leadership Studies

Seminar weekend course in Leadership Studies.

EXD
498
Hours
1-12
Senior Project

Student-designed major project or research in approved area. Required of all EXD students before graduation.

FA
200
FA
Hours
3
Introductn To Fine Arts

An introduction to the fine arts, drawing especially on campus and community cultural events. This course is usually open to incoming freshmen.

Fine Arts
FIN
101
Hours
3
Elementary Finnish I

Contemporary Finnish: speaking, reading, and writing. Course involves directed-self-instructional approach in the Critical Languages Center. Students are required to study the textbook and practice with assigned audio visual materials (CDs, DVDs, or computer files). Students have practice sessions three hours per week with a “language trainer” who is a native/near native (or superior level) speaker of the language. Native speakers of this language cannot take this course. Any students with background knowledge of this language must see the CLC director before registering for permission. Not repeatable without permission of the CLC director.

FR
101
FL, HU
Hours
4
Elementary French I

For students who have never studied French; or with one year of high school French; or with one or more years of elementary or middle school French. This course focuses on fundamental spoken and written communication in French while developing knowledge of cultural topics relating to contemporary French and French-speaking countries. Offered each semester.

Foreign Language, Humanities
FR
102
FL, HU
Hours
4
Elementary French II

Continuation of FR 101. This course focuses on further enhancing communicative abilities, cultural practices and perspectives in French. Offered each semester.

Prerequisite(s): Must have a minimum grade of a C- in FR 101, or 2 years or less of high school French.
Foreign Language, Humanities
FR
201
HU
Hours
3
Intermediate French

For students with previous study of elementary-level French. Further development of oral and written communication skills in French through the exploration of various themes in French and Francophone culture.

Prerequisite(s): Minimum grade of a C- in FR 102 or minimum grade of a C- in FR 103
Humanities
FR
202
HU
Hours
3
Intermediate French

Continuation of FR 201. Preparation for advanced literature, linguistics, and culture courses.

Prerequisite(s): Minimum grade of a C- in FR 201
Humanities
FR
205
Hours
1-2
Living In French House

Students live in the French House with a native (or near native) speaker and agree to dedicate two hours per week to full language immersion with a view to increasing oral proficiency.

Prerequisite(s): FR 201, or 202, or 206, or 321, or 322, or 323, or 324, or 328, or 329
FR
206
Hours
1-2
Living In French House

Students live in the French House with a native (or near native) speaker and agree to dedicate two hours per week to full language immersion with a view to increasing oral proficiency.

Prerequisite(s): FR 201, or 202, or 205, or 321, or 322, or 323, or 324, or 328, or 329
FR
321
W
Hours
3
Voices In French

Introduction to literary and cultural analysis through selected works of French cultural expression. Emphasis on expanding vocabulary and improving grammar in order to develop speaking, reading, and writing proficiency beyond the second year. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course. Usually offered in the fall semester. Study abroad equivalent: FR 328.

Prerequisite(s): FR 202
Writing
FR
322
Hours
3
Advanced French Grammar

Review of French grammar with emphasis on written exercises. Study abroad equivalent: FR 329. Usually offered in the fall semester.

Prerequisite(s): FR 202
FR
323
W
Hours
3
Text, Image, And Word

Contemporary French and Francophone society and culture. Continued work in literary and cultural analysis through selected works of recent cultural media (journalism, literature, music, film). Emphasis on written exposition, oral proficiency, critical thinking, grammar review. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course. Usually offered in the spring semester. Study abroad equivalent: FR 328.

Prerequisite(s): FR 202
Writing
FR
324
Hours
3
Commercial French

Introduction to basic business language and vocabulary, business protocol and culture in French-speaking countries.

Prerequisite(s): FR 321 or FR 322 or FR 323 or by permission of the instructor or by placement exam
FR
325
FL
Hours
3
Cultures and Conversations

This course is designed to advance students’ proficiency in spoken and conversational French while exploring French and Francophone cultures. As they engage in various individual and collaborative projects, students will improve their ability to function in the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication. Through critical exploration and analysis of a variety of materials (short texts and newspaper articles, television clips, films, songs, and images), students will review and expand their vocabulary and grammatical knowledge, refine their pronunciation and listening comprehension skills to develop their oral fluency. The specific topics explored will be at the discretion of the instructor teaching the course. One option is to explore the culture of food and fashion (including, food as culture and fashion as culture) in France. The course will consider the importance of food and fashion as a form of cultural and personal expression, specifically how food and fashion have served to indicate social status, gender identity, national identity, religious identity, and political engagement.

Prerequisite(s): French 202; or equivalent from another institution; or a 5 on the AP French Exam
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: FR 202; or equivalent from another institution; or a 5 on the AP French Exam
Foreign Language
FR
328
Hours
3
French Conversation-Abroad

Contemporary French society and culture. Direct on-site cultural exposure. Analysis of recent cultural media (e.g., journalism, literature, song, film) in context. Emphasis is on written exposition, oral proficiency, grammar review, and critical appraisal in relation to an immersion experience in French culture. Offered in France. For purposes of satisfying the requirements of the French major or minor, this course can be used in lieu of either FR 321 or FR 323.

FR
329
Hours
3
Adv Fr Grammar-Abroad

No description available.

FR
331
Hours
3
French Civilization

The course is also taught abroad as FR 339. Study of French artistic heritage and development of social and political institutions. Offered alternate fall semesters.

Prerequisite(s): FR 321 or FR 322 or FR 323
FR
339
Hours
3
French Civilizatn-Abroad

No description available.

FR
341
L, W
Hours
3
Survey Fr Literature I

French literature from its origins through the 18th century. Readings from major authors, lectures, and reports. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course. Offered fall semesters.

Prerequisite(s): FR 321 or FR 322 or FR 323
Literature, Writing
FR
351
W
Hours
3
Survey Fr Literature II

French literature of the 19th and 20th centuries. Readings from major authors, lectures, and reports. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course. Offered spring semesters.

Prerequisite(s): FR 321 OR FR 322 OR FR 323
Writing
FR
361
Hours
3
Intro Romance Linguistic (Same as IT 361 and SP 361)

Introduction to linguistic science and its use in describing language in general and the Romance languages in particular.

FR
380
Hours
1-3
Special Topics

Directed reading, research, or French Immersion Retreat. Also offered within the curriculum for the Alabama-in-France summer program. Topic to be determined in consultation with the instructor or program director.

FR
421
Hours
3
Pronunciation & Phonetics

Introduction to phonetic theory and corrective phonetics through auditory discrimination exercises and contrastive analysis; emphasis on mastery of oral skills. Offered each semester.

Prerequisite(s): FR 321 or FR 322 or FR 323
FR
424
FL, HU
Hours
3
Globalization, Business and Marketing

This course, entirely conducted in French, is articulated around a global simulation, alternating individual and collaborative projects. Pairs of students create their own fictitious company and a product sold by the company. Students collaborate to conceive and design develop marketing and advertising tools that culminate with the development of their company website. Through the study of written communications, advertising, and business material, readings (newspaper articles, best practices on web construction websites, marketing strategies articles in trade publications), audio documents (radio newscasts and marketing strategies podcasts), and videos (television ads, short films, television newscasts), students acquire an understanding of how global and local factors affect marketing culture and practices in French-speaking countries. Students also explore large French companies websites and reflect on issues of global versus local markets. As they engaged in the various projects, students refine and expand their intercultural communicative competence while performing marketing-related activities in French.

Prerequisite(s): FR 324 or 331
Foreign Language, Humanities
FR
431
Hours
3
Contemp French Civiliztn

Exploration of the political, technological, and cultural movements of France from 1871 to the present. Offered alternate fall semesters.

Prerequisite(s): FR 321 OR FR 322 OR FR 323
FR
441
FL, HU, L
Hours
3
Page & Stage

Focuses on theater. Analysis and interpretation of theatrical texts with emphasis on student research and presentations, including vocal expression and physical interpretation.

Prerequisite(s): FR 321, 322, or 323
Foreign Language, Humanities, Literature
FR
461
Hours
3
French Linguistics

Linguistic theory applied in the analysis and description of French phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic structures. Offered alternate years.

Prerequisite(s): FR 321 or FR 322 or FR 323
FR
470
Hours
3
Undergrad Sem In French

Intensive examination of a selected topic, with emphasis on student research and presentations. A representative sample of topics would include: Francophone Africa, The 19-Century French Novel, French-English Translation, and Poetry of the French Renaissance. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours.

Prerequisite(s): FR 341 OR FR 351 OR FR 331 OR FR 431 OR FR 321 OR FR 322 OR FR 323
FR
480
Hours
3
Special Topics

Directed reading or research related to French and Francophone language, literature and culture. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 hours.

Prerequisite(s): FR 341 OR FR 351 OR FR 331 OR FR 431 OR FR 321 OR FR 322 OR FR 323
FR
484
Hours
3
Adv Converstn Phonetics

Emphasis is on improvement of oral expression in a variety of contexts. Consideration of phonetics as it serves this goal. For purposes of satisfying the requirements of the French major or minor, this course can be used in lieu of FR 421.

Prerequisite(s): FR 321 or FR 322 or FR 323.
FRS
101
FL
Hours
3
Elementary Farsi I

Contemporary Farsi (Persian): speaking, reading, and writing. Course involves supervised-self-instructional approach in the Critical Languages Center. Students are required to study the textbook and practice with assigned audio visual materials (CDs, DVDs, or computer files). Students have practice sessions three hours per week with a “language trainer” who is a native/near native (or superior level) speaker of the language. Native or near native speakers of this language are NOT allowed to take this course. Any students with any background knowledge of this language must see the CLC director BEFORE enrolling. Not repeatable without permission of the CLC director.

Foreign Language
FRS
102
FL
Hours
3
Elementary Farsi II

Continuation of FRS 101. Contemporary Farsi (Persian): speaking, reading, and writing. Course involves supervised self-instructional approach at the Critical Languages Center. Students are required to study the textbook and practice with assigned audio visual materials (CDs, DVDs, or computer files). Students have practice sessions three hours per week with a “language trainer.” Native speakers or near native speakers of the language are NOT allowed to enroll.

Prerequisite(s): FRS 101
Foreign Language
FRS
201
Hours
3
Intermediate Farsi I

Continuation of Farsi (Persian) language on the Intermediate level. Emphasis is on the development of reading skills and writing proficiency. Offered according to demand. Not repeatable without persmion of the CLC director.

Prerequisite(s): FRS 102
FRS
202
Hours
3
Intermediate Farsi II

Continuation of Farsi (Persian) language on the Intermediate level. Emphasis is on the development of reading skills and writing proficiency. Native speakers or near native speakers of the language are NOT allowed to enroll. Offered according to demand. Not repeatable without permission of the CLC director.

Prerequisite(s): FRS 201
GEO
101
N
Hours
4
The Dynamic Earth

Three lectures and one laboratory. Study of the earth including materials, internal and external processes, deformational events, and plate tectonics. Offered in the fall, spring, and summer semesters.

Natural Science
GEO
102
N
Hours
4
The Earth Through Time

Three lectures and one laboratory. Survey of earth's history including origin of the earth, plate tectonics and evolution of the continents and ocean basins, and the development of life. Offered in the fall, spring, and summer semesters.

Natural Science
GEO
103
N
Hours
4
Introduction to Oceanography

This course is an introductory study of the Earth Ocean system, including processes shaping the ocean floor and coastlines; basic physical and chemical properties of the seawater; ocean circulation and climate change, and biological productivity and marine life.

Prerequisite(s): None
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: None
Natural Science
GEO
104
N
Hours
4
Hazardous Earth

This natural science course examines geologic and other Earth hazards that impact humans and ways that human activities often increase these hazards. The course consists of lecture and lab, and includes field trips and videos that illustrate various natural hazards.

Natural Science
GEO
105
N
Hours
4
Sustainable Earth

Three lectures and one laboratory. Lecture and laboratory provide an understanding of important earth resources (rocks and minerals, soil, water, fossil fuels, alternative energy) and how their utilization by humans impacts the environment. Includes discussion of water pollution, air pollution and waste disposal as primary issues related to resource utilization.

Natural Science
GEO
205
Hours
3
Communicating Geology

No description available.

GEO
210
Hours
4
Mineralogy

Two lectures and two laboratories. Introduction to crystallography, crystal chemistry, rock-forming minerals, physical properties of minerals, hand sample mineral identification, and optical mineralogy. Offered in the fall semester.

Prerequisite(s): CH 101 or CH 117; and GEO 101
GEO
306
Hours
3
Hydrogeology

Introduction to the principles of groundwater flow, groundwater exploration, water quality, and groundwater contamination; environmental topics in groundwater. Offered in the fall semester.

Prerequisite(s): GEO 101
GEO
314
Hours
4
Ign. & Meta. Petrology

Three lectures and one laboratory. Megascopic and microscopic study of igneous and metamorphic rocks, with emphasis on identification, classification, genesis, and relationships to tectonism. Offered in the spring semester.

Prerequisite(s): GEO 210
GEO
355
Hours
3
Invertebrate Paleontology

Two lectures and one laboratory. Study of the taxonomy and morphology of major invertebrate fossil groups. Offered in the spring semester.

Prerequisite(s): GEO 101 and GEO 102
GEO
363
Hours
3
Geomorphology

Two lectures and one laboratory. Study of landforms with emphasis on the basic geomorphic processes that contribute to their origin. Offered in the fall semester.

Prerequisite(s): GEO 101
GEO
365
Hours
3
Structural Geology

Two lectures and one laboratory. An introductory study of the deformation of rocks, including mechanical principles, description and identification of folds and faults, map interpretation, and regional tectonics. Offered in the fall semester.

Prerequisite(s): GEO 101 and PH 101
GEO
367
Hours
4
Sedimentology/Stratigraphy

Three lectures and one laboratory. Study of the principles involved in the description and classification of sedimentary rocks and stratigraphic units, with emphasis on sedimentary processes and depositional environments. Offered in the spring semester.

Prerequisite(s): GEO 102 and GEO 210
GEO
369
Hours
3
Introduction Geophysics

Introduction to the major fields of exploration geophysics such as seismology, isostasy, heat flow, gravity and magnetic prospecting, and electrical methods. The course includes both principles and applications to petroleum, mining, and environmental problems. Offered in the fall semester.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 125 and PH 102 and GEO 101
GEO
399
Hours
1-6
Undergraduate Research

A maximum of 4 hours can be applied toward the major in geology. Approval of the department chairperson is required prior to registration. Offered according to demand.

GEO
401
W
Hours
3
Paleoclimatology

Survey of the history of global climate change and the methods used to measure paleoclimate in the geological record. Offered in the Spring semester.

Prerequisite(s): GEO 101 or GEO 102
Writing
GEO
407
Hours
3
Seismology

This course provides an overview of earthquake seismology for both upper-level and graduate geo-science students. Topics include elastic wave propagation, seismic ray theory, travel time interpretations, surface wave dispersion, and seismic tomography.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 126 or MATH 146
GEO
410
Hours
3
Soil & Groundwater Restoration

Methods for restoring contaminated soil groundwater by examining the factors and processes influencing the efficacy of remediation systems. Emphasis placed on the scientific principles upon which soil and groundwater remediation is based.

Prerequisite(s): GEO 101 and CH 101 or CH 117 and CH 102 or 118
GEO
411
Hours
3
Contaminant Transport in Porous Media

This course will cover topics related to the transport and fate of contaminants in subsurface systems. Specifically, this course will discuss the many factors and processes influencing contaminant transport such as the effects of dispersion, inter-phase mass transfer, transformation reactions, and porous-media heterogeneity. In addition, representative conceptual/mathematical models describing contaminant transport phenomena will be discussed.

GEO
416
W
Hours
3
Volcanology

Study of the physical properties of magmas, eruptive mechanisms, volcanic products, and the relationship between volcanism and tectonism. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course. Offered in the fall semester.

Prerequisite(s): GEO 101 The Dynamic Earth GEO 314 Ign. & Meta. Petrology
Writing
GEO
420
Hours
3
Petroleum Geology

Introduction to the origin, migration, accumulation, and entrapment of petroleum. Emphasis is on sedimentary, geochemical, and hydrodynamic processes. Offered in the spring semester of even-numbered years.

Prerequisite(s): GEO 365 and GEO 367
GEO
421
Hours
3
Geology & History of W Turkey

This two week long course will emphasize environmental geology history, geoarchaeology, and natural hazards of the Greco-Roman city states in Western Anatolia. It will concentrate on the effects of geology and natural hazards in the decline and eventual fall of these large city states and cultural centers.

GEO
424
Hours
1-4
Topics In Geology

Special topics in the following areas: economic geology, geochemistry, geophysics, geomorphology, hydrogeology, mineralogy, paleontology, petrology, sedimentology, stratigraphy, structural geology, and tectonics. Offered according to demand.

Prerequisite(s): GEO 101 The Dynamic Earth / Minimum Grade of C-
GEO
430
Hours
3
Ore Deposits

Introduction to sedimentary hydrothermal, metasomatic, and magnetic ore deposits, including geologic setting and genesis. Offered on demand.

Prerequisite(s): GEO 210
GEO
435
Hours
1
Honors Sem In Geology

Oral presentations on current geological topics. Offered in the fall semester.

GEO
436
UH
Hours
1
Honors Sem In Geology

Oral presentations on current geological topics. Offered in the spring semester.

University Honors
GEO
446
Hours
3
Scientific Computing

This course covers a broad range of computational methods used in the geosciences. Topics include data analysis, manipulation and image processing, using a variety of software packages. Offered according to demand.

GEO
470
W
Hours
3
General Geochemistry

Overview of the field of geochemistry (elementary chemical equilibria and thermodynamics, organic geochemistry, isotope geochemistry), with an emphasis on solving geologic problems. Offered in the Spring semester.

Prerequisite(s): GEO 314
Writing
GEO
476
Hours
3
Analytical Geochemistry

Theory, techniques, and applications of geochemical methods for the analysis of rocks, soils, and aqueous fluids. Offered according to demand.

GEO
490
Hours
1-3
Seminar Regional Geology

Seminar on and field trip to important geologic localities. May be repeated for credit. Offered according to demand.

Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: GEO 314
GEO
495
Hours
6
Field Geology

Five-week field course involving the application of geologic techniques and principles. Includes geologic mapping, data collection, and report writing. Offered during the first summer term.

Prerequisite(s): GEO 314 and GEO 365 and GEO 367
GEO
497
Hours
3
Geological Internships

A maximum of 4 hours can be applied toward the major in Geology. Field and laboratory projects with government and industry. Offered according to demand.

Prerequisite(s): GEO 101 and GEO 102 or GEO 105
GEO
499
Hours
1-4
Research In Geology

Offered according to demand.

GN
101
FL, HU
Hours
4
Elementary German I

First semester German language course. Class meets five times a week.

Foreign Language, Humanities
GN
102
FL, HU
Hours
4
Elementary German II

Second semester German language course. Class meets five times a week.

Prerequisite(s): GN 101 with a grade of “C” or better, placement exam, or permission of instructor.
Foreign Language, Humanities
GN
103
FL, HU
Hours
4
Accelerated Elementary German

Intensive, accelerated study of first and second semester German language curriculum. Class meets five times a week.

Foreign Language, Humanities
GN
201
HU
Hours
3
Intermediate German I

Third semester German language course.

Prerequisite(s): GN 102 or GN 103 with a grade of “C” or better, placement exam, or permission of instructor.
Humanities
GN
202
HU
Hours
3
Intermediate German II

Fourth semester German language course.

Prerequisite(s): GN 201 with a grade of “C” or better, placement exam, or permission of instructor.
Humanities
GN
205
Hours
2
Living German House I

Students living in the German House agree to speak only German, under the supervision of a house director who is a native speaker of German.

GN
206
Hours
2
Living German House II

Students living in the German House agree to speak only German, under the supervision of a house director who is a native speaker of German.

GN
240
Hours
3
Introduction to German Linguistics

Course introduces students to basic linguistic concepts as they apply to German and language generally. What are the different kinds of German spoken by different speakers in varied places? Why are there different kinds of German used? We will also examine the sounds of German (phonology), word parts (morphology), how the parts stream together (syntax), lexicon, semantics, and how German fits in in the broader world. Taught in English.

Prerequisite(s): None
GN
250
Hours
3
Germanic Mythology

Introduction to gods and myths of the early Germanic peoples as represented in writing and art, as well as the impact of Germanic mythology on Western culture and civilization.

GN
254
Hours
3
Survey of German Cinema

An overview of German Cinema from Silent Era in the 20's through New German Cinema, to post-wall works. Topics: history, socio-cultural frame, directors and cinematography.

GN
260
HU
Hours
3
Holocaust In Film & Lit

An exploration of the aesthetic and ethical issues involved in artistic representations of the Holocaust.

Humanities
GN
264
HU, L
Hours
3
German Literature Translatn I

A survey in English of German literary masterpieces ranging from the Ring of the Nibelungs and Tristan and Isolde to Goethe's Faust. Themes include love, myth, religious freedom, war and peace, and nationhood.

Humanities, Literature
GN
265
HU, L
Hours
3
German Lit In Translatn II

A survey in English of German literary masterpieces of the 19th and 20th centuries. Themes include communism and capitalism, Hitler and the Holocaust, gender, and the responsibility of scientists. Authors might include Kafka, Hesse, Mann, and Grass.

Humanities, Literature
GN
275
Hours
3
Germany Contemp Europe

Study of Germany's place in today's Europe; political, social, and cultural aspects are examined.

GN
361
Hours
3
Interm Convers Comp I

Emphasis is on increasing speaking and writing skills in German. Includes essay writing and grammar review.

Prerequisite(s): GN 202 with a grade of “C” or better, placement exam, or permission of instructor.
GN
362
Hours
3
Interm Convers Comp II

Emphasis is on increasing speaking and writing skills in German. Includes essay writing and grammar review.

Prerequisite(s): GN 202 with a grade of “C” or better, placement exam, or permission of instructor.
GN
365
Hours
3
Business German

Acquisition of business German used in commercial transactions. Emphasis is on business letters and business conversation.

Prerequisite(s): GN 361 or GN 362 or instructor approval
GN
371
Hours
3
German Culture and Civilization Thru 1832

A survey of German cultural history from the Germanic tribes through the Age of Goethe. Emphasis is on developments in philosophy, religious thought, music, art, architecture, and popular culture in the context of political and social history.

Prerequisite(s): GN 361 or GN 362 or instructor approval
GN
372
Hours
3
Germn Cult Civ 1832-Present

A survey of German cultural history from the 1830s to the present.

Prerequisite(s): GN 361 or GN 362 or instructor approval
GN
381
Hours
1-4
Directed Readings

Students planning to enroll should confer with the instructor before registration.

GN
403
Hours
3
Undergraduate Seminar

Intensive study of one or more significant subjects, authors, periods, works, or genres not studied in depth in other courses.

Prerequisite(s): GN 371 or GN 372
GN
404
Hours
3
Undergraduate Seminar

Intensive study of one or more significant subjects, authors, periods, works, or genres not studied in depth in other courses.

Prerequisite(s): GN 371 or GN 372
GN
450
Hours
3
Intermed Business German

Expands and deepens knowledge of business German and prepares students for such internationally recognized business German examinations as the Zertifikat Deutsch f?r den Beruf and Pr?fung Wirtschaftsdeutsch International.

Prerequisite(s): GN 365
GN
461
W
Hours
3
Adv Gn Convers Comp I

A continuation of GN 361 or GN 362. Discussion, readings, essay writing, and oral reports on variable topics. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): GN 361 or GN 362 with a grade of “C” or better.
Writing
GN
462
W
Hours
3
Adv Gn Convers Comp II

Discussion, readings, essay writing, and oral reports in German. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): GN 361 or GN 362 with a grade of “C” or better.
Writing
GN
481
Hours
1-4
Directed Readings

Students planning to enroll should confer with the instructor before registration.

GN
482
Hours
1-4
Directed Readings

Students planning to enroll should confer with the instructor before registration.

GR
101
FL, HU
Hours
3
Beginning Greek I

Fundamentals of Greek grammar and syntax. Offered in the fall semester.

Foreign Language, Humanities
GR
102
FL, HU
Hours
3
Beginning Greek II

Continued study of the fundamentals of Greek grammar and syntax. Offered in the spring semester.

Foreign Language, Humanities
GR
201
Hours
3
Intermediate Greek I

Introduction to and practice in reading Greek literature, particularly Homer's Iliad.

GR
202
Hours
3
Intermediate Greek II

An introduction to Greek prose with an emphasis on Xenophon's Anabasis.

GR
301
Hours
3
Advanced Greek I

Select readings from Greek prose and poetry. An effort is made to accommodate the student's special interests. Offered according to demand.

GR
302
Hours
3
Advanced Greek II

More select readings from Greek prose and poetry. An effort is made to accommodate the student's special interests. Offered according to demand.

GR
490
Hours
3
Adv Greek Literature

Select readings in Greek literature. An effort is made to accommodate the student's special interests. The course may be repeated for credit. Offered according to demand.

GS
111
Hours
1-3
Academic Skills

A one-, two-, or three-part course in academic skills for students eligible for the Student Support Services Program. Enrollment in each of the components is based on a diagnosed need. Offered in the fall and spring semesters.

GS
391
Hours
1-6
Exceptional Studies

Independent study and/or research on an approved topic, under the direction of a College of Arts and Sciences faculty member. The subject matter, methodology, goals, and objectives of the study are intended to be unique.

GS
491
Hours
1-3
Academic Internship

Students work with a faculty member on a planned and supervised activity related to the instructional, research, or service functions of the College of Arts and Sciences.

GY
101
N
Hours
4
Atmospheric Proc & Patterns

Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory period. Earth-space relations, latitude and longitude, seasons, time, weather, climate, and vegetation. Particular attention is given to the causes of weather and climate and why they tend to be different from place to place.

Natural Science
GY
102
N
Hours
4
Earth Surface Processes

Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory period. Study of earth-surface processes, with consideration of human interaction with the physical environment. Subjects include landforms, water resources, soils, and mapping the physical environment.

Natural Science
GY
105
SB
Hours
3
World Regional Geography

Introduction to geography through a survey of the world's major geographic regions. Examines their physical and cultural features, economies, and populations.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
GY
110
SB
Hours
3
People, Places, and Environment

Introduction to geography as a science for learning the fundamentals of human behavior and decision making. Examines how human events, natural resources, economies, development, and urbanization impact the way humankind lives, organizes its space, and makes decisions for the future.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
GY
200
Hours
3
Principles Of Planning

Survey of the basic elements of regional and urban planning. Provides a comprehensive overview of the planning profession.

GY
202
N
Hours
4
The Water Planet

This course is about water on earth, and the content will integrate scientific elements from the disciplines of atmospheric science, geography, geology, hydrology, oceanography, and water resources. The course is organized based on the large-scale elements of the hydrologic cycle and the smaller-scale elements of the water balance concept, especially as they affect water resources.

Natural Science
GY
204
Hours
4
Map & Air Photo Interpretation

Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory period. Fundamentals of map reading and interpretation.

GY
207
N
Hours
4
Field Studies in Water and Climate

Water is one of the most abundant, yet most precious, natural resources on Earth. Its movement and properties are determined by processes occurring within and across many geosystems, including rivers, lakes, glaciers, groundwater, and climate systems. This course explores how different components of Earth’s water system operate and the processes linking the components together. We will also explore how people modify and utilize Earth’s water systems. Our course will be based in Innsbruck, Austria, a geographic location with a variety of water systems, including glaciers, which have very strong ties to Earth’s climate system. We will take fieldtrips to local glaciers and rivers to examine how water systems operate in the “real world” and learn techniques used to measure and understand how these systems change over space and time. We will also take fieldtrips to Prague, Czech Republic and Munich, Germany to better understand how humans modify water systems, through processes such as river regulation. GY 207 is designated a natural science (NS) course.

Natural Science
GY
230
C
Hours
3
Geographic Information Systems

This course will offer practical GIS training for non-geography majors. It will focus on geospatial data representation and analysis in ArcGIS.

Prerequisite(s): CS 102
Computer Science
GY
302
Hours
3
Climatology

Introduce the fundamentals of the earth-atmosphere system as they comprise the climate of Earth, drive spatial and temporal climate variability, and impact life.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101
GY
317
Hours
3
Natural Hazards

Examination of the causes, consequences, and spatial distribution of climatic, geomorphic, and human-induced natural hazards.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101 or GY 102
GY
330
C
Hours
4
Computr Mapping Graphics

Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory period. Introduction to computer graphics and their application in both the natural and social sciences, with special emphasis on mapping. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): GY 204 and CS 102
Computer Science
GY
339
Hours
3
Natural Resource Envirmn Plang

Analyzes human interactions with the physical environment and ways of dealing with them. Integrates environmental science, social science, and planning, and includes environmental impact assessment.

GY
341
Hours
3
Geography Of Us And Canada

Study of the physical and human geography of the United States and Canada.

GY
344
Hours
3
Geography Of Africa

Study of the physical and human geography of Africa.

GY
345
Hours
3
Geography of Latin America

This course is designed to provide a regional survey of Latin America’s environments and peoples from a geographic perspective. The course presents the physical landscape as well as the changing environment in Latin America. The course then explores the major historical, cultural, and economical aspects of the region. The course will have an emphasis in processes that shape the major contemporary issues, such as development, urbanization, and environmental change.

GY
346
Hours
3
Geography of Europe

This course is designed to provide a regional survey of Europe in terms of economic activities and the physcial environment. Special emaphasis is on the historical development of European landscapes.

GY
351
Hours
3
Geography Of Alabama

Study of the varied geographical dimensions of the state of Alabama, both past and present.

GY
358
Hours
3
Urban Geography

Examines the growth of cities, their spatial distributions, internal dynamics, functional bases, and social and political patterns.

Prerequisite(s): GY 110
GY
363
Hours
3
Geomorphology

Study of physical, chemical and biological processes operating at the Earth's surface and landforms, and the landscapes such processes develop.

Prerequisite(s): GY 102 or GEO 101
GY
365
W
Hours
3
Industrial Develop & Location

Systematic study of the principles and processes underlying the development, location, and spatial organization of economic activities from both a national and international perspective. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): GY 110
Writing
GY
370
Hours
3
Special Topics

No description available.

GY
375
Hours
3
Sports Geography

Sports are an important part of society and contribute billions of dollars to the global economy. This course examines the geographic dimensions of sports, primarily in North America, with some reflections on Europe for contrast. The geography of sports can be analyzed through the use of concepts found in a variety of human geography subdisciplines, including cultural, historical, economic, population, urban, and political geography. The course covers a variety of topics and helps students develop a holistic view of sports with regards to spatial interactions. Geography courses explain why things are where they are on the surface of the Earth. In other words, students develop a spatial perspective in thinking about their surroundings.

GY
377
Hours
3
Cultural Geography

Study of the way in which culture influences elements of both physical and human landscapes with emphasis on how cultures are spread over space and how cultures make sense of space.

Prerequisite(s): GY 105 or GY 110
GY
385
Hours
3
Watershed Management Plan Development

This course is designed to be primarily an experiential course and will address development and implementation of a Watershed Management Plan. The North River Watershed Management Plan will be used as a working model and students will review theory before carrying out experiential learning in the field.

GY
404
Hours
3
Physical Geography Seast Us

A study of the physical landscapes in the southeastern United States. Emphasis is on the geological setting, geomorphic features, climate, soils, and vegetation, and the interrelationships of these conditions that shape the landscape in this region.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101 and GY 102; or GEO 101
GY
405
Hours
1-3
Dir Res Physical Geog

Hands-on, problem solving in the field of physical geography.

GY
406
Hours
1-3
Dir Res Human Geography

Hands-on, problem solving in the field of human geography.

GY
409
Hours
4
Forest History and Restoration

This course covers the theories, tools and techniques used in historical ecology with a focus on the establishment of reference conditions for habitat conservation and restoration efforts.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101 or GY 102
GY
410
Hours
3
The Geography of National Parks

This course is devoted to the changing geography of the national park system and protected areas, with an emphasis on their design, planning, and operations.

Prerequisite(s): GY 110
GY
412
Hours
3
Hydroclimatology

To provide a basic understanding of the waters of Earth, especially with relation to the effects of precipitation and evaporation upon the occurence and character of water in streams, lakes and on or below the land surface.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101 and GY 302
GY
413
Hours
3
Applied Climatology

Applied Climatology is a graduate/senior level course designed to expand upon fundamental concepts learned in GY 101. Within this broad field, a specific focus in GY 413 concentrates upon climate and human health/behavior, and human modification of climate. The course contains a mixture of lecture, lab, and field assignments.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101
GY
414
Hours
3
Climate Change and Health

This course is an introduction to the effect of global climate change on health. The course will be taught from a geographical perspective and will introduce students to the physical science of climate change and the impact it has on health through discussion of extreme weather events, altered ecological systems, and threats to human security and welfare. Discussion will build on the core concepts of climate change science to provide students with a solid foundation to further examine a variety of topics from acute impacts such as heat waves and other weather extremes to chronic conditions such as shifting disease vector habitats, degraded air quality, and food security. Direct correlations between health impacts and climate change will be emphasized throughout as will discussion of mitigation and adaptation strategies.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101
GY
415
Hours
3
The Geography of Extinctions and Endangered Species

This course examines the individuals, institutions, research, controversies, and policies that have developed around wildlife extinction, ecological problems associated with extinction, and endangered species. The course also examines the stories of several lost or vanishing species. This course, which has been developed out of the instructor's current research projects, uses lectures, readings, student-led discussions, writing assignments, and one exam to explore how humans have contributed to, while at the same time grappling with, the issue of wildlife conservation and extinction.

GY
417
W
Hours
3
Extreme Weather and Society

EW&S is an integrated physical and social science seminar class consisting of readings, discussion, and lectures on perception, understanding, and communication of severe weather hazards.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101
Writing
GY
420
C
Hours
4
Remote Sensing I

Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory period. Introduction to the basic principles of electromagnetic radiation, interaction between energy and earth features, remote sensing instruments, and information extraction from remotely sensed data. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): GY 204 and CS 102
Computer Science
GY
424
Hours
3-9
Cartography Practicum

Individual work experience in cartography, supervised by faculty and staff of The University of Alabama. A maximum of 3 hours of internship or practicum credit can be applied to the geography major. Credit for GY 424 cannot be applied to the geography minor.

GY
425
Hours
3-9
Cartography Internship

Individual work experience on a cartographic project, supervised by the staff of an off-campus agency. A maximum of 3 hours of internship or practicum credit can be applied to the geography major. Credit for GY 425 cannot be applied to the geography minor.

GY
430
C
Hours
1,3
Intro Geographic Info Systems

Three hours lecture and one hour laboratory period. Introduces the basic concepts of GIS, including definition and components of GIS, spatial data structures, data sources, data input, manipulation and analysis, applications of GIS, and managing GIS. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): GY 204 and CS 102
Computer Science
GY
431
Hours
4
GIS in Emergency Management

Addresses geo-spatial data, methods, and software used in mitigation, planning, response, and recovery phases of emergency management. Case studies and scenarios are drawn from meteorological, environmental, geological, and biological hazards and disasters.

Prerequisite(s): GY 430
GY
432
Hours
1-4
Spec Research In Geog

No description available.

GY
433
Hours
3-9
Gis Practicum

Individual work experience in GIS, supervised by the faculty and staff of The University of Alabama. A maximum of 3 hours of internship or practicum credit can be applied to the geography major. Credit for GY 433 cannot be applied to the geography minor.

GY
434
Hours
3-9
Gis Internship

Individual work experience in GIS, supervised by the staff of an off-campus agency. A maximum of 3 hours of internship or practicum credit can be applied to the geography major. Credit for GY 434 cannot be applied to the geography minor.

GY
435
C
Hours
4
Remote Sensing II

Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory period. Analysis and extraction of thematic information from nonphotographic remotely sensed data for geographic information systems. Topics include image processing, image enhancement, and image classification. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): GY 420
Computer Science
GY
436
C
Hours
4
Adv Geographic Info Syst

Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory period. Evaluation of case studies, spatial model development, and database design for geographic information systems. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): GY 430
Computer Science
GY
437
Hours
4
GIS for Transportation

The application of Geographic Information Systems to transportation has resulted in a sub-field known as GIS-T. This course will provide a hands-on introduction to GIS-T.

Prerequisite(s): GY 204
GY
438
Hours
4
Application Issues In Gis

Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory period. In-depth study of various topics in the application and technical issues of geographic information systems. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): GY 430
GY
439
Hours
4
GIS Programming

This course focuses on the extension of geographic information systems (GIS) through programming as well as on the development of stand-alone algorithms for spatial analysis and numerical modeling.

Prerequisite(s): GY 230 (proposed) or GY 430
GY
440
W
Hours
3
Commun Facil Planning

Principles, processes, and analysis of public facility location planning, with emphasis on the spatial search process, impact analysis, and public facility location models.

Writing
GY
441
Hours
3
Land Use Regulations

Theory and use of zoning, eminent domain, taxing and police powers, enabling acts, charters, official maps, codes, nuisance ordinances, and environmental impact statements in community planning.

Prerequisite(s): GY 200
GY
442
Hours
4
GIS in Biogeography

Addresses the application of GIS data and methods in analyzing geographic distribution and trends of plants and animals. Labs draw data and methods from a variety of biogeographic contexts including historical, modern, terrestrial, marine, conservation, and climate change.

Prerequisite(s): GY 430
GY
444
Hours
6
Field Studies In Africa

Three-week intensive field study in Ghana. Explores geographical perspectives on Africa's level of development and the responses of the African peoples to their circumstances.

GY
450
Hours
4
Conservation Field Studies in Belize

Study Belize’s diverse rainforests, coral reefs, and visit Mayan ruins for a glimpse into a past civilization. Belize is unique in that it still contains relatively undisturbed rainforests and the longest barrier reef in the Western Hemisphere. However, while Belize has emerged as an international leader regarding conservation efforts, threats from climate change, poverty, and development still exist. The purpose of this course is 1) examine current conservation efforts to safeguard this biodiversity; 2) familiarize students with the most important aspects of tropical lowland terrestrial and marine ecosystems; 3) understand the role of local culture in sustainable conservation; 4) gain an understanding of the fundamental importance of biodiversity; and 5) expose students to new and unique cultures and environments. The course is designed for students who are interested in conservation issues, biogeography, marine sciences, ornithology and birding, archaeology, and outdoor adventures.

Prerequisite(s): GY 102
GY
452
Hours
3
Environ Decision Making

Review of the history of natural resources in the U.S. and current environmental topics, followed by discussion of techniques to facilitate environmental decision making and management.

GY
453
W
Hours
3
Environment & Society

Exploration of the linkages between the biophysical environment and human social systems. Public policy implications are viewed from a social science perspective. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): GY 110
Writing
GY
454
Hours
4
Costa Rica Field Studies: Tropical Ecology, Conservation, and Development

This program with provide students with a broad interdisciplinary experience encompassing tropical ecology, conservation and development (TECD) in a highly experiential learning context.

GY
455
Hours
3-9
Planning Practicum

Individual work experience in planning, supervised by faculty and staff of The University of Alabama. A maximum of 3 hours of internship or practicum credit can be applied to the geography major. Credit for GY 455 cannot be applied to the geography minor.

GY
456
Hours
3-9
Planning Internship

Individual work experience in planning, supervised by the staff of an off-campus agency. A maximum of 3 hours of internship or practicum credit can be applied to the geography major. Credit for GY 456 cannot be applied to the geography minor.

GY
458
W
Hours
3
Urban Planning And Analysis

A study of contemporary urban landscapes, political and economic power structures, and resultant conflicts. Includes an in-depth analysis of the role of externalities, the urban planner, urban policymaking, and analytical methods in the planning and administration of urban landscapes.

Writing
GY
460
Hours
3
Environmental Management

Introduces students to the impact of humans on the planet and the patterns of human behavior necessary to preserve and manage the environment in a self-sustaining manner. Emphasis is on writing and speaking.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101
GY
463
Hours
4
Ecosystem Services: Theory and Practice

This course will prepare students to function effectively as future researchers and policy-makers on topics related to sustainability and sustainable management of ecosystem-oriented projects and activities. The concept of ecosystem services provides one approach to facilitate trade-off decision making to identify win-win strategies among multiple stakeholders with often conflicting near-term objectives.

GY
465
Hours
3
Region Planning Analysis

Principles and processes of regional planning and the analytical methods appropriate for solving regional planning problems. Case studies and the role of the planner in the regional planning process are discussed.

GY
466
Hours
3
Transport Geography

Examines the location and function of the multimodal North American transportation system, the urban transportation planning process and methodologies. Assesses the political and environmental contexts of transport systems, including impacts of continued reliance on the automobile.

Prerequisite(s): GY 105 or GY 110, or instructor permission
GY
470
Hours
3
Special Topics

No description available.

GY
472
Hours
4
Soil Science

Three hours lecture and required field and lab work. Introduction to the study of soils, including soil formation, classification, and the interpretation of soils to reconstruct environmental histories.

GY
473
Hours
3
Public Policy Development in Water Resources

This course will evaluate the current approaches to policy theory and examine systematically the broader implications of the substantive aspects of public policy development in the water resources spectrum. In analysis of public policy development in water resources, the student will look at both policy process and policy substance. Attention will be given to the questions of how and why water policy differs across states, and how one might evaluate policy performance cross-nationally.

GY
477
Hours
3
Water Resources Management, Law, and Policy

The Water Resources Management, Law, and Policy course will provide students with a survey of water resources development, control, law, policy and management with particular emphasis on public policy considerations including: the acquisition and exercise of water rights—appropriative and riparian; groundwater management; water districts and user organizations; environmental considerations; Federal/State relations including interstate allocation; and the Alabama Water Resources Act. The course will also address international water law—the multinational treaties, laws, cases, practices and politics governing Earth’s transboundary freshwater resources (watercourses including rivers, streams, lakes, and groundwater aquifers) shared by two or more countries.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101 and GY 102; or GEO 101
GY
483
Hours
3-9
Environment Science Internship

Individual work experience in environmental science, supervised by the staff of an off-campus agency. A maximum of 3 hours of internship or practicum credit can be applied to the geography major. Credit for GY 483 cannot be applied to the geography minor.

GY
485
Hours
3
River Hydrology

Rivers are dynamic natural systems that are of great importance to ecosystems and society. This course examines river hydrology processes from a physical geography perspective. A major theme of the course will be impacts of human actions on river systems.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101 or GY 102
GY
486
W
Hours
3
Watershed Dynamics

An examination of the physical operation of watersheds focusing on surface water hydrology, erosion, and sedimentation. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): GY 102
Writing
GY
489
W
Hours
4
Forest Ecology Veg Analy

Three hours lecture and required field work. Study of the nature of forest communities and the interrelationship of organisms that compose them.

Writing
GY
490
Hours
3-9
Geography Internship

Work experience in an agency involved in geographical analysis. A maximum of 3 hours of internship or practicum credit can be applied to the geography major. Credit for GY 490 cannot be applied to the geography minor.

GY
491
W
Hours
3
Fluvial Geomorphology

This course provides an in-depth investigation of the processes that determine the form and evolution of rivers and streams. Questions addressed by this course include the following. What processes determine the form and evolution of rivers and streams? How can we infer process from form and vice versa? How do river form and process vary spatially and temporally? What principles of fluvial geomorphology are needed for river restoration and management? The course will combine lectures, discussions, field data collection, and modeling activities. This course can be taken for writing credit. Therefore, TWO INDIVIDUAL writing assignments are required. In order to earn a passing grade in this course, you will be required to demonstrate writing proficiency to standards expected for the geosciences. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper division student in the geosciences will not be given a passing grade, no matter how well they perform on other course components.

Prerequisite(s): GY/GEO 363 Geomorphology
Writing
GY
492
Hours
4
Eastern Forest Communities and Silvics

This field course is focused on the biotic and abiotic elements that create distinct forest communities throughout the eastern US, with a particular emphasis on woody plant assemblages including the silvics of dominant and indicator species in different community types. Applications to forest management are stressed.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101 or GY 102 or BSC 114
GY
493
Hours
4
Plant Geography

This course covers basic biotic and abiotic terrestrial ecosystem components, environmental gradients, plant distribution patterns, dispersal, colonization, and migration, disturbance processes, and applications to biodiversity conservation.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101 or GY 102 or BSC 114
GY
494
Hours
4
Forest Measurement & Analysis

This course is designed to provide students with a theoretical foundation and practical experiences in measuring, inventorying, and describing trees, stands, and forests.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101 or GY 102 or BSC 114 or BSC 116
GY
495
Hours
3
Coastal Geomorphology

The coastlines of the world, at the triple interface of land, sea, and air, are dynamic geomorphic environments. They are often subject to abrupt changes, associated with storms for example, as well as slower, long-term changes, such as those associated with sea level change. Coastal environments are home to most of the earth’s human population and they include, at the same time, some of the most hazardous of locations. The purpose of this course is to provide a general introduction to the subject of coastal geomorphology, with emphasis on coastal environments and landforms, and with a survey of coastal processes.

GY
496
Hours
4
Forest Ecosystem Management: Silviculture

In this course silviculture is treated as applied forest ecology. The goal of this course is to provide students with a knowledge of silviculture and its ecological basis so they can design manipulations in forest ecosystems to achieve a range of management objectives. The course requires field trips to tour different sites and visit with forest scientists and managers. In this course students learn about tree growth and stand development and use this information to develop silvicultural prescriptions to meet a diverse range of management goals. We will explore how silvicultural treatments can influence stand structure and composition and how these changes influence timber quantity and quality, forest health, biodiversity, soil, and wildlife habitat among other features. We will also focus on how silviculture is influenced by broader social, economic, and ecological issues.

Prerequisite(s): GY489 or GY409 or GY492 or GY494 or instructor permission
HEB
101
FL
Hours
3
Elem Hebrew Language

Contemporary Hebrew: speaking, reading, and writing. Course involves directed-self-instructional approach in the Critical Languages Center. Students are required to study the textbook and practice with assigned audio visual materials (CDs, DVDs, or computer files). Students have practice sessions three hours per week with a “language trainer” who is a native/near native (or superior level) speaker of the language. Native speakers of this language cannot take this course. Any students with background knowledge of this language must see the CLC director before registering for permission. Not repeatable without permission of the CLC director. Offered each semester.

Foreign Language
HEB
102
FL
Hours
3
Elem Hebrew Language

Contemporary Hebrew: speaking, reading, and writing. Course involves mixed self-instructional approach in the Critical Languages Center. Students are required to study the textbook and practice with assigned audio visual materials (CDs, DVDs, or computer files). Students have practice sessions three hours per week with a language "trainer" who is a native/near native speaker of the language. Not repeatable without permission of CLC director. Offered each semester.

Prerequisite(s): HEB 101
Foreign Language
HEB
201
Hours
3
Intermed Hebrew Language

Continuation of Hebrew language on the intermediate level. Emphasis is on the development of reading skills and writing proficiency. Not repeatable without permission of CLC director. Offered according to demand.

Prerequisite(s): HEB 102
HEB
202
Hours
3
Intermed Hebrew Language

Continuation of HEB 201. Emphasis is on the development of reading skills and writing proficiency. Not repeatable without consent of CLC director. Offered according to demand.

Prerequisite(s): HEB 102
HIN
101
FL
Hours
3
Elementary Hindi

Contemporary Hindi: speaking, reading, and writing. Course involves directed-self-instructional approach in the Critical Languages Center. Students are required to study the textbook and practice with assigned audio visual materials (CDs, DVDs, or computer files). Students have practice sessions three hours per week with a “language trainer” who is a native/near native (or superior level) speaker of the language. Native speakers of this language cannot take this course. Any students with background knowledge of this language must see the CLC director for permission before registering. Not repeatable without permission of the CLC director.

Foreign Language
HIN
102
FL
Hours
3
Elementary Hindi

Contemporary Hindi: speaking, reading, and writing. Course involves directed self-instructional approach in the Critical Languages Center. Students are required to study the textbook and practice with assigned audio visual materials (CDs, DVDs, or computer files). Students have practice sessions three hours per week with a “language trainer” who is a native/near native/superior-level speaker of the language. Not repeatable without permission of the CLC director.

Prerequisite(s): HIN 101
Foreign Language
HY
101
HI
Hours
3
Western Civ To 1648

A history of Western civilization from its origins in Greece and Rome through the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Reformation, and the age of discovery and expansion during the emergence of modern Europe. Usually offered in the summer session.

History
HY
102
HI
Hours
3
Western Civ Since 1648

Covers the development of the Western world from the Thirty Years' War to the post-World War II era: the age of absolutism, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, industrialization and the wars of the 20th century. Usually offered in the summer session.

History
HY
103
HI
Hours
3
History of American Civilization to 1865

A survey of American history from its beginning to the end of the Civil War, giving special emphasis to the events, people, and ideas that have made America a distinctive civilization. Open to freshmen.

Prerequisite(s): None
History
HY
104
HI
Hours
3
America Civilization Since 1865

A survey of American history from the Civil War to the present, giving special emphasis to the events, people, and ideas that have made America a distinctive civilization. Open to freshmen.

Prerequisite(s): none
History
HY
105
HI, UH
Hours
3
Honors West Civ To 1648

Honors sections of HY 101.

History, University Honors
HY
106
HI, UH
Hours
3
Honors West Civ Sc 1648

Honors sections of HY 102.

History, University Honors
HY
107
HI, UH
Hours
3
Honors American Civilization to 1865

An honors-level approach to the American experience; parallel to HY 203.

Prerequisite(s): Invitation of the department or membership in the University Honors Program
History, University Honors
HY
108
HI, UH
Hours
3
Honors American Civilization Since 1865

An honors-level approach to the American experience.

Prerequisite(s): Invitation of the department or membership in the University Honors Program.
History, University Honors
HY
110
Hours
3
Comparative World Civ

Examines various civilizations in the world prior to A.D. 1500 and compares their governments, societies, economies, religions, science, learning, and technology. History majors may substitute HY 110 for HY 101 to satisfy part of the Western civilization requirement.

HY
111
HI
Hours
3
Colonial Latin America

Formation of the largely Spanish speaking New World, from the shock of conquest to the trials of freedom that spawned the modern nations of Latin America.

Prerequisite(s): None
History
HY
112
HI
Hours
3
Modern Latin America Since 1808

Survey of political, economic, and social life in the 19th and 20th centuries with emphasis on the larger countries (Brazil, Mexico, and Argentina).

Prerequisite(s): None
History
HY
113
HI
Hours
3
Asian Civilization to 1400

Broad survey of Asian civilization from the earliest times covering India, China, Korea, Japan and Southeast Asian, with large cultural and religious emphases.

Prerequisite(s): None
History
HY
114
HI
Hours
3
Modern Asia since 1400

Conditions of various Asian civilizations in the 15th century, followed by the arrival of Europeans, with emphasis on imperialism, colonialism and Asian nationalism.

Prerequisite(s): None
History
HY
115
HI
Hours
3
History of Science to 1687

This course will explore the origins and evolution of science and technology and the relationship both had to the societies that produced them. In addition to reading foundational texts in the history of science, like Aristotle and Galileo, we will address larger themes, including the relationship between science and religion and the role of science and scientists in the societies that produced them.

History
HY
116
HI
Hours
3
History of Science Since 1687

Science and technology are ever-present in today’s world, defining not only how we live our daily lives but also shaping our conceptions and evaluations of modernity, civilization, and progress. How did science and technology become so important and pervasive to the modern world? This course is intended as an introduction to the history of modern science and technology from the Enlightenment to the present. Our focus will be on the development of science and technology in the Western World (Europe and North America). However, we will also make comparisons across cultures to explore how science and technology shaped notions of what counts as “Western” and “modern.” In addition to learning about key developments in the history of science and technology, from Ford’s Model-T to Einstein’s theory of relativity, we will address larger themes, including the relationship between science and religion and the role of technology in war and empire.

History
HY
200
Hours
1-3
Special Studies in Hy

No description available.

HY
225
Hours
3
Hy Alabama To 1865

State history under the flags of Spain, France, Great Britain, the U.S., and the Confederate States, with emphasis on cultural heritage.

HY
226
Hours
3
Hy Alabama From 1865

Survey of Alabama's history and personalities since 1865: Reconstruction, agrarian revolt, Progressivism, the KKK, Dixiecrats and the Civil Rights movement.

HY
235
Hours
3
Christ Church To 1500

Survey of the Christian church from its origins in the Middle East through its victory over the Roman Empire and its ascendancy in the Middle Ages.

HY
236
Hours
3
Christ Church Sc 1500

Cultural and institutional history of the Christian church with emphasis on the Reformation and Counter-Reformation and discussion of the church in the New World.

HY
247
Hours
3
England To 1688

History of Western civilization in one country, from Anglo-Saxon times to the growth of absolutism and resistance.

HY
248
Hours
3
England Since 1688

England from the Glorious Revolution to the post-World War II era, with emphasis on social and cultural topics as well as foreign affairs.

HY
295
Hours
3
Us Naval History

Traces the development of the U.S. Navy from sailing ships to nuclear vessels, and relates it to political and economic conditions and to wars throughout American history.

HY
300
Hours
3
Special Studies in History

Special studies in history. May be repeated for a maximum of 18 hours.

HY
301
Hours
1-3
Independent Study

Directed study done by special arrangement with a faculty member of the History Department. Requires sophomore standing and permission of the instructor.

HY
308
Hours
3
Colonial America

History of the social, cultural, and political interactions of all the peoples in early North America and the Caribbean from the sixteenth century through the 1760s, with an emphasis on the diversity of experiences across categories of race, gender, socioeconomic status, religion, and age.

HY
312
Hours
3
American South Before 1865

The South from colonial times to the Civil War, tracing the growth of the plantation system, extension of the frontier, commerce and industry, cultural influences, and the institution of slavery.

HY
313
Hours
3
American South Since 1865

History of the South since 1865, covering Reconstruction, the Bourbon Democracy, the New South Creed, populist revolt, World War I, the 1920s, the Great Depression, the civil rights movement, and Southern politics.

HY
314
Hours
3
Coming Of The Civil War

American history from 1815 to 1861, giving special emphasis to the development of a distinctive American culture and the factors within that culture that led to the Civil War.

HY
315
Hours
3
The Civil War

The military, political, diplomatic, social, and intellectual aspects of the Civil War years, and the impact of the war on subsequent American history.

HY
316
Hours
3
Life & Legend Abraham Lincoln

The life and legend of the man often considered to be the representative American.

HY
318
Hours
3
U S Since 1945

Topical survey of the economic, social, political, and cultural developments in the United States since World War II.

HY
319
Hours
3
19th Century Black History

Role of black Americans in American life from the 17th century to the beginning of the 20th century, with emphasis on the institutions and events of the 1800s.

HY
320
Hours
3
20th Century Black History

The interrelationship of blacks and the industrial-urban environment of the United States.

HY
321
Hours
3
Religion in Modern Europe

A survey of religious thought and practice in Europe since 1750.

HY
323
Hours
3
Us Constitut Hy to 1877

Deals with the evolution of constitutional law and the nature and process of judicial review, including 18th-century constitutional theory and Supreme Court decisions.

HY
324
Hours
3
Us Constitut Hy sc 1877

Continuation of HY 323, tracing developments up to the current Supreme Court.

HY
325
Hours
3
Us-World Power to 1898

Emphasizes idealism and realism in foreign policy, the change from isolationism to international involvement, "New Manifest Destiny," and the rise of America to world power.

HY
326
Hours
3
Us-World Power sc 1898

Emphasizes American international involvement through the Panama Canal, the Roosevelt Corollary, World War I and the League of Nations, Pearl Harbor and World War II, the Cold War, Vietnam War, and after.

HY
327
Hours
3
Women in Early America

Examines the history of women in early North America from 1660 to 1877.

HY
330
Hours
3
Civil Rights Movement

History of the leaders, organizations, and events of the Civil Rights Movement during the years 1945 to 1968.

HY
331
Hours
3
Religion and Civil Rights

Course Description: This course in History and African American Studies surveys the interaction of religion and civil rights during mid-twentieth century America. While national in scope, it will pay special attention to the place of Alabama and particularly Tuscaloosa. The guiding question for the course will be what difference religion make – or did not make – in the development of the civil rights movement.

HY
332
Hours
3
Native American History

This course examines the histories of hundreds of indigenous peoples in North America from early human habitation to the present day, with a focus on those residing in what is now the United States and Canada. We will study their experiences; their encounters with one another, Europeans, and Africans; and the different histories that people have told about those experiences and encounters. Class materials, which include art, film, and fiction as well as history and anthropology, stress the diversity of Native lifeways as well as the ways in which the history of American Indians has often been ignored, changed, appropriated, and distorted, as well as reclaimed and re-evaluated over time. Some of the questions we will consider throughout the semester include: How much can we know about Indigenous peoples before they had an alphabetic written history? What can European sources teach us about the Native peoples they encountered? How did the Natives of North America live before 1492? Does it make any sense to generalize about “Indians,” given that they include a large number of diverse peoples? How did contact with Europeans and Africans (and their diseases and technologies) change Native societies? How did Natives affect Europeans and Africans? Why did Native peoples lose ground (literally and figuratively) in the nineteenth century? How have Natives experienced and reacted to the changes of the twentieth century? What does it mean to be a Native person in the United States today?.

HY
333
Hours
3
America in the Progressive Era: A Nation Comes of Age

There have only been a handful of times in our nation’s history that can rightly be described as transformative. These have been eras in which, as Doris Kearns Goodwin rightly says, “a molt seems to take place, and an altered country begins to emerge.” In this context, we readily recall the American Revolution and the Civil War, but we may easily overlook the Progressive Era. To do so is a mistake that this course seeks to correct. For this was when the United States came of age as a world power, and also when Americans nationwide acquired a dynamic sense of their national identity. In vigorous and distinctive ways, Presidents Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson reshaped America and left their distinctive imprints on our national character. Their joint legacy, rightly or wrongly, was to use the power of the national government to enlarge the scope of American democracy. The Progressive Era itself ended dismally in race riots, a frenzied Red Scare, and the inept presidency of Warren Harding, but the progressive spirit would continue to smolder and occasionally spark fires of idealism and renewed efforts to conquer new frontiers to the present day.

HY
334
Hours
3
The Nineteenth Century City

Consider our ability to walk into a store and buy something already made off the rack. Or baseball, the All American sport. Or living in an apartment house beside people who are very different from us. What do these three things have in common? The answer is this: they can get us on our way to talking about the beginnings of city life in the United States during the nineteenth century. This course will explore the emergence of urban life in this country by exploring several issues, among them race, class, gender, culture, labor and geography.

HY
335
Hours
3
Handmade Nation: Knitting and History

Knitting has enjoyed a huge comeback in the U.S. in the last decade, largely thanks to interest in DIY and environmentally sustainable consumption. This class explores the history, art, and politics of knitting. Students will learn to knit (or develop their skills as knitters) and also analyze knitting as a fascinating window onto the rest of the world. Topics explored include the craft’s history, women’s and men’s work, the politics of art vs. craft, consumerism, globalization, and the craft’s role in activism. Half of class time will be studio-based and half will focus on discussion of the readings. There are no prerequisites. You will also develop the ability to think historically through critical analysis of primary and secondary sources; place events, people, and documents in their historical contexts; and create your own historical interpretations and narratives about the past. In this course, you should expect to do much more than memorize facts or dates -- you will be busy actively learning by knitting and doing history, not passively sitting back and being told what to think.

HY
336
Hours
3
U.S. Disability History

This course places the experiences of people with disabilities at the center of the American story, from long before Europeans arrived in North America through today. We will explore the changing lives of people with disabilities—from railroad workers and rights activists to wheelchair athletes and participants in freak shows to college students and more—as well as the history of disability policy and conceptions of disability. We will focus on the social and cultural history of disability rather than its strictly physical or medical aspects. U.S. Disability History takes a new approach to familiar topics in U.S. history, including colonization, slavery, immigration, racial and gender stereotypes, education, civil rights, and citizenship, among others.

HY
341
Hours
3
Hy US - Vietnam War

Survey of the historical background of the conflict in Indochina leading to U.S. involvement and its consequences.

HY
345
Hours
3
Race and Science

Race and Science examines the diverse interactions between science and race from the 18th century to the present era of human genomics. The class looks both at the scientific study of race and the impact of racial concepts on science. These interactions have given us: Nazi medicine, American eugenics, the Tuskegee experiments, and “race specific” contemporary pharmaceuticals. By the end of this course, students will have the opportunity to write (with consultation) a publishable-quality essay on one aspect of this important issue in history and bioscience ethics.

HY
346
Hours
3
Epidemics! A History of Medicine

The history of medicine is the history of disease. Plague, bloody flux, yellow fever, the flu, cholera, ebola, smallpox, AIDS — at one time or another, each of these terms inspired terror. They’ve entered our otherwise flourishing civilizations and, like a wildfire, cut down men, women, children, rich, poor, religious, non-believers, even the healers themselves. Like phantoms, they disappeared as fast as they came; but once introduced to these mysterious visitors, no society remained unchanged. In this history of medicine, we examine six major epidemics over the last three thousand years. We’ll then turn to three epidemics of the present: cancer, healthcare-associated infections, and bioterrorism. How have humans responded to these threats? How has medicine adapted, if it has? What are our triumphs and when have we been unable to stop our invisible adversaries?.

HY
349
Hours
3
History of France 1760-present

This course examines major trends in the social, cultural, economic and political history of modern France. Major themes include: republicanism and citizenship, nationalism, daily life, war, class conflict, consumerism, imperalism, the arts and gender.

HY
355
Hours
3
German History Sc 1740

No description available.

HY
357
Hours
3
World War I

The war to end all wars," from the European crises culminating at Sarajevo in 1914 to peacemaking at Versailles in 1919, with emphasis on the western and eastern fronts and on the war at sea.

HY
358
Hours
3
World War II

The global conflict, or series of conflicts, from Manchukuo in 1931 to Tokyo Bay in 1945, with emphasis on battles on land and sea and in the air, life on the home fronts and in enemy-occupied areas, and the legacy of the war to future generations. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

HY
361
Hours
3
Russia to 1894

Political history of Russia from the ninth to the 19th centuries, followed by social and cultural history of the Russian revolutionary movement.

HY
362
Hours
3
Russia-Soviet Union since 1894

Crisis in Russian society and the coming of the Revolution; the emergence of Stalinism; and political developments since World War II, including the disintegration of the Soviet system.

HY
365
Hours
3
European Consumer Society

This course explores the evolution of modern Europe's consumer society from the 18th century to the present to understand how changing patterns of consumption fostered new relationships between individuals and the material world.

HY
368
Hours
3
From Columbus to Castro: Caribbean History Since 1492

Conquistadors! Planters! Pirates! Indians! Enslaved Africans! Religious Reformers! Independence Leaders! Radical Revolutionaries! Together these people built a new world – a world forged at the intersection of imperial ambitions and international contact, where the peoples and cultures of the Americas, Africa, and Europe collided. This class examines how colonialism, plantation slavery, the age of abolition, and the emergence of national independence movements made the modern Caribbean.

HY
370
Hours
3
A History of the Atlantic World, 1400-1800

In what ways did the Atlantic Ocean resemble an early-modern super-highway, moving people, ideas, and products across its waters? How did the individuals who shaped this world – rebellious slaves, elite planters, Aztec emperors, wayward sailors, Kongolese kings, infamous pirates and radical revolutionaries – contribute to the creation of this vibrant and dynamic world? A History of the Atlantic World answers these questions by tracing four centuries of interactions among Europeans, Africans and Native Americans, from the first European forays down the west coast of Africa in the fifteenth century, to the turbulent Age of Revolutions at the close of the eighteenth century.

HY
371
Hours
3
History of Brazil

Why study Brazil? This South American nation is the fifth largest in the world in both geography and population. It is now home to the sixth largest economy in the world (surpassing the United Kingdom in 2013). Brazil is also a nation rich in racial, cultural, and linguistic diversity. In many ways, Brazil’s history of slavery, plantation agriculture, immigration, and industrialization offer a compelling distant mirror for understanding the trajectory of U.S. history and the rest of the Americas. In this class we will explore themes of gender, immigration, racial identity, industrialization, modernization, state formation, and dictatorship and democracy.

HY
377
Hours
3
Mexico since 1810

Mexican Independence, the Constitution of 1824, Santa Anna, revolutions in the 19th and 20th centuries, and contemporary Mexico.

HY
378
Hours
3
Drugs, Booze, and Mexican Society

This course is a hybrid survey of Mexican history since conquest, the history of the US-Mexican border, and a view of that history through the lens of drug production, consumption, and influence on Mexican society and US-Mexican relations. In short, the goal of this course is to impart an understanding of drugs as embedded in Mexican social, political, economic, and cultural contexts, providing students with a view from the Mexican side of the border. Alcohol and marijuana will be the focus of the course, but other substances will enter into certain readings throughout the semester. An important theme in this course is to answer the question “What are the origins of today’s War on Drugs?” In addition, the course will endeavour to provide a broader, international context for the development and use of intoxicants and the drug trade, both legal and illegal.

HY
379
Hours
3
History of Modern Argentina

From the time of its incorporation into the Spanish Empire, the land now known as Argentina has held out the promise of fabulous wealth and opportunity. This potential made Argentina the foremost destination of European immigrants to Latin America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, during which time it became one of the wealthiest nations in the world. Many Argentines have anxiously awaited the day when their nation would be included among the ranks of “first world” or “civilized” nations, and they take great pride in their adoption and adaptation of European culture. However, Argentina’s history has not always been so rosy. Political violence, economic catastrophe, and social unrest define the modern Argentine experience as much as economic prosperity, industrialization, and the development of a rich and dynamic culture. From the gauchos (Argentine cowboys) of the vast Pampas to the smoke-filled tango parlors, immigrant tenements, and factories of Buenos Aires, Argentina offers a fascinating case for examining the creation and sustainment of identity and nationality in Latin America.

HY
384
Hours
3
Ancient Egypt Near East

No description available.

HY
385
Hours
3
History Of Greece

No description available.

HY
386
Hours
3
History Of Rome

No description available.

HY
390
Hours
3
Survey of Irish History

A comprehensive look at the Irish experience from prehistoric times to the present.

HY
395
Hours
3
History Colloquium

Intensive reading, writing, and discussion on special topics in history.

HY
399
UH
Hours
3
History Honors Colloquium

Focuses on the discipline of history itself. Will examine some of the fundamental questions about what history is and why the study of history matters. Subject matter varies by term.

University Honors
HY
400
W
Hours
1-6
Special Studies in History

Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course. May be repeated for a maximum of 18 hours.

Writing
HY
402
Hours
3
Modern Japan since 1550

Major emphasis on the end of the Tokugawa Period (1800-1868), the rise of modernized Japan in the Meiji Period (1868-1912) and the 20th century.

HY
403
Hours
3
Chinese Civ. to 1600

Survey of Chinese culture from the Shang period through the Ming period.

HY
404
Hours
3
Modern China since 1600

Survey of Chinese history in the Ch'ing Dynasty and the 20th century with emphasis on 19th- and 20th-century events.

HY
408
Hours
3
Colonial Us to 1763

Topical survey of major themes in U.S. colonial history, with particular emphasis on Anglo-American developments.

HY
409
W
Hours
3
Amer Rev/New Nation

The development of revolutionary sentiment in the North American colonies, the resulting revolution, and the subsequent efforts to establish the new nation. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
HY
410
Hours
3
Antebellum America

This course will explore the antebellum period as an era of great change in the United State. Between 1820 and 1860, we witness an expanding frontier in the Cotton South, but also the rise of the “city,” among other things. While the South will always be on our radar, we will also be interested in finding meaning in other regions by paying close attention to the people who move through or live in them and the landscape itself.

HY
411
Hours
3
Comp. Slavery & Emancipation

Explores the development of slavery and the struggles for emancipation in the Americas 1400-1900. Focusing on how race, gender and region shaped experiences.

HY
412
Hours
3
Slavery America Popular Cult

An examination of slavery in American popular culture from the 1840s to the present. Topics and media include fiction, autobiography, film and television, advertising, and confederate celebrations.

Prerequisite(s): HY 203
HY
413
W
Hours
3
Mexican War Thru Civil War

Examines how Americans thought about and used armed force from 1845 to 1865.Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
HY
416
Hours
3
Us Fr Recons To Wwar I

Selected topics relating to the development of the U.S., especially domestic affairs and the growth of important institutions.

HY
417
Hours
3
US from WWI to WWII

Covers U.S. participation in two world wars, the Roaring Twenties, and the Great Depression. Government, society, and culture receive attention and analysis.

HY
423
Hours
3
North American Borderlands: A Comparative History

This course begins with the Age of European Exploration, but the major focus will be on U.S.-Canadian, U.S.-Mexican, and Native American borderlands beginning with the 16th Century. Even though borderlands are frequently located at the peripheries of empires and nations, they play a major—and often overlooked—role in shaping how centers of national power—major cities, state governments, and national capitols—have defined their relation to issues such as territorial expansions, sovereignty, immigration, labor, community formation, and race and ethnicity. As a comparative course, we will address multiple themes, including legal regimes in the borderlands, inter-American power relations, immigration, citizenship, human rights, and sovereignty; intercultural and racial mixture and conflict; nationalism, transnationalism, and internationalism; openings and closing of borders; and the multiple meanings and locations of borderlands, making this course appropriate not only for students of history, but also of anthropology, sociology, and political science.

HY
424
W
Hours
3
American Thought Before 1860

American intellectual/cultural history to 1860. Includes changing ideas about society, politics, morality, science, nature, religion, gender and race. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
HY
425
W
Hours
3
American Thought since 1860

American intellectual/cultural history since 1860. Includes changing ideas about society, politics, morality, science, nature, religion, gender and race. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
HY
428
Hours
3
Women In America

Examines the experiences of women from mid-nineteenth century to present with special attention to ideologies about women's roles and effects of region, race, class and ethnicity.

HY
429
Hours
3
Spanish Frontier in N. America

History of the Spanish advance into the present-day borders of the U.S., explaining how Spain fought and finally succumbed to the more dynamic and aggressive French and English.

HY
430
W
Hours
3
UG Research Seminar

This course offers students extensive training in research methods and writing. It will normally culminate in a 15 page research paper based on primary source materials, as well as an oral presentation. Instructors may also choose to offer a range of equivalent alternatives at their discretion. In all events the course will offer students a rewarding opportunity to practice the craft of historical research. A grade of C or higher is required for credit in the major, and writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
HY
432
W
Hours
3
Gender and Native Americans: Beyond Pocohontas

Explores contact between Native Americans and Europeans in the early Americas through attention to gender, stressing the diversity of Native life ways.

Writing
HY
442
Hours
3
The Middle Ages

Foundations of the modern world in barbarian Europe: retreat into the countryside and private government, recovery of public institutions, money economy, and cultural vitality.

HY
443
W
Hours
3
Renaissance

Study of intellectual movements associated with the Renaissance, including readings in Machiavelli's Prince, More's Utopia, and other humanist writings; social life, economy, religion, politics, and statecraft. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
HY
444
W
Hours
3
Reform & Counter-Reformation

History of the separation of the Catholic and Protestant churches from the ideal of the universal Christian church and late medieval religious practice. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
HY
446
Hours
3
Age of Reason 1715-89

The Enlightenment of Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau, Franklin, Hume, Goethe, and Kant, whose writings exalted individual reason, tolerance, liberalism, science, and public service and set the stage for the French Revolution.

HY
448
Hours
3
Women in Europe since 1750

This course surveys women's lives in Europe from 1750 to the present. Themes explored include: identity construction, power relationships, domesticity, class, war, consumerism and sexuality.

HY
451
W
Hours
3
Early Modern Germany

This course examines the political, religious, intellectual, military, cultural and social history of German speaking central Europe from the Eve of the Protestant Reformation to the eve of the French Revolution. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
HY
455
W
Hours
3
The Darwinian Revolution

Though it is often believed to begin with Charles Darwin, Evolutionary Theory has a history dating back to the seventeenth century. In this course we will focus on this history from those early beginnings century through modern genetics and epigenetics. Along with Charles Darwin himself, we will explore the contributions of other well-known scientists, such as Lamarck, Charles Lyell, T. H. Huxley, Gregor Mendel, and T. H. Morgan. Additionally, we will familiarize ourselves with the ideas of less well known but important individuals whose theories are crucial for understanding the development of evolutionary theory and the shaping of Darwin’s legacy. Throughout the course, we will also examine their contributions in specific historical contexts, pausing to pay particular attention to social responses to the developing theory of Darwinism. Ultimately, we will leave with a fuller understanding of and a greater appreciation for what we now term “evolutionary theory.” As a “W” course, writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade. In other words, no matter how well you do in other aspects of the course, you must write with the skill normally required of upper level students in History to pass. Written assignments will require coherent, logical, and carefully edited prose. Students will be required to demonstrate higher-level critical thinking skills.

Writing
HY
471
Hours
3
Age Exploration & Conquest

A history of exploration during the 15th and 16th centuries, when European nations expanded by sea voyages and conquest, settling in the Americas, Africa, and Asia.

HY
474
W
Hours
3
Relation US Latin Amer

Chronological survey of diplomatic, economic, and cultural relations, with emphasis on the 20th century. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
HY
475
Hours
3
Caribbean Basin 1492 - Present

Traces the evolution of Caribbean and Central American nations from the first European settlements to the present.

HY
476
Hours
3
HY Religion in Latin America

The history of religion in Latin America from the late fifteenth century through the early twenty-first century.

HY
480
Hours
3
Survey of Military History

Introduction to the ways in which human beings have organized and used armed force over the course of recorded history.

HY
481
W
Hours
3
War/Dipl. in Med & Mod. Europe

This course examines developments in European warfare and diplomatic practice in the late medieval and early modern periods. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
HY
482
W
Hours
3
War & Religion in the West

This course examines the complex interrelationships between religion and armed conflict in the Western tradition from the ancient world into modern times. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
HY
483
Hours
3
Thirty Years' War

This course explores the background, events, and consequences of the Thirty Years’ War that raged in the center of Europe from 1618 to 1648. We will examine not only the history of the war itself, but also the multiple controversies that continue to divide scholars over the causes, nature, and significance of the conflict. Readings will include both primary and secondary sources.

HY
490
W
Hours
3
England under Tudors

Development of an early modern state: establishment of a strong central monarchy, religious crises from the Reformation to the Puritan movement, and exuberance and excess of an expanding society. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
HY
491
W
Hours
3
England under Stuarts

How Englishmen of the 17th century worked out the great questions of their day: Was liberty compatible with strong government? Could English elites share power without destroying it? What did God want for England? Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
HY
493
W
Hours
3
Britain in the 18th Century

From the Hanoverian Succession in 1714 to victory at Waterloo in 1815: political development, the Agrarian and Industrial Revolutions, John Wesley, Samuel Johnson, and an apparently endless succession of wars. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Writing
HY
494
W
Hours
3
Britain in the Victorian Age

Britain at her apogee: possessor of the empire on which the sun never set, world economic leader, nation of Peel and Palmerston, Gladstone and Disraeli, Dickens and Trollope, Tennyson and Browning, Turner and Constable.

Writing
HY
498
UH
Hours
3
Honors Thesis I

Independent research and writing to produce a senior honors thesis in history.

University Honors
HY
499
UH, W
Hours
3
Honors Thesis II

History 499 is the writing portion of the History honors thesis course sequence. Students taking HY 499 will have completed HY 498, Honors Thesis I, in which they will have selected and researched a topic in conjunction with their advising professor. Individual requirements may vary, but all honors theses will be based on original primary source research, and typically are about fifty pages/fourteen thousand words in length. The thesis will demonstrate advanced writing and research ability for the undergraduate level. Per the University designation for Writing courses, “Writing proficiency for this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.” Even if all other requirements are met, failure to meet the History Department’s writing standards will result in a failing grade. In order to complete the course, two professors other than the professor of record must read and approve the final thesis.

Prerequisite(s): HY 399 and HY 498
University Honors, Writing
INDO
101
FL
Hours
3
Elem Indonesian Language

Contemporary Indonesian: speaking, reading, and writing. Course involves directed-self-instructional approach in the Critical Languages Center. Students are required to study the textbook and practice with assigned audio visual materials (CDs, DVDs, or computer files). Students have practice sessions three hours per week with a “language trainer” who is a native/near native (or superior level) speaker of the language. Native speakers of this language cannot take this course. Any students with background knowledge of this language must see the CLC director for permission before registering. Not repeatable without permission of the CLC director.

Foreign Language
INDO
102
FL
Hours
3
Elem Indonesian Language

Contemporary Indonesian: speaking, reading, and writing. Course involves directed self-instructional approach in the Critical Languages Center. Students are required to study the textbook and practice with assigned audio visual materials (CDs, DVDs, or computer files). Students have practice sessions three hours per week with a “language trainer” who is a native/near native/superior-level speaker of the language. Not repeatable without permission of the CLC director.

Prerequisite(s): INDO 101
Foreign Language
INDO
201
Hours
3
Intermediate Indonesian

Continuation of Indonesian language on the intermediate level. Emphasis is on the development of reading skills and writing proficiency. Offered according to demand.

Prerequisite(s): INDO 102
IT
101
FL, HU
Hours
4
Introductory Italian I

Five hours of instruction per week. The course is the first semester of college-level language study. Offered each semester.

Foreign Language, Humanities
IT
102
FL, HU
Hours
4
Introductory Italian II

Five hours of instruction per week. The course is the second semester of college-level language study. Offered each semester.

Prerequisite(s): IT 101 with a grade of C- or instructor permission
Foreign Language, Humanities
IT
201
HU
Hours
3
Intermediate Italian I

Basic grammar review, development of writing skills, and introduction to literature.

Prerequisite(s): IT 102 with a grade of C- or instructor permission
Humanities
IT
202
HU
Hours
3
Intermediate Italian

Basic grammar review, development of writing skills, and introduction to literature.

Prerequisite(s): IT 201 with a grade of C- or instructor permission
Humanities
IT
323
W
Hours
3
Introduction to Italian Cinema

This course provides a chronological overview of the history of Italian cinema from its early days to the present. We will survey the major Italian film movements, including Neorealism, commedia all’italiana, and the Spaghetti Western, as well as the work of key filmmakers, including Roberto Rossellini, Luchino Visconti, Federico Fellini, Michelangelo Antonioni, Pier Paolo Pasolini and Bernardo Bertolucci. The course will focus primarily on the history of style and narrative in Italian cinema, but will also consider developments in the film industry. Italian film will be compared to international cinematic production in ways that draw out the relation of cinema to the transnational, while also exploring the connection between cinematic existent and emergent cultural forms both in Italy and abroad. The course is in English and the films shown are in Italian with English subtitles. Writing proficiency within the discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): No prerequisites
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: None
Writing
IT
352
Hours
3
Italian Conversation - Study Abroad

This course focuses on the development of conversational skills through group discussion, oral presentations, vocabulary building, and other related activities. It is taught at the Leonardo Da Vinci School in Florence, Italy. The Leonardo Da Vinci School is licensed by the Italian Ministry of Education and recognized by the Region of Tuscany as a Professional Training Center.

Prerequisite(s): IT 102 and/or permission of the instructor.
IT
353
Hours
3
Italian Conversation

Development of conversational skills through role-playing, oral presentations, and vocabulary building. May be taken once in Italy and once on campus.

Prerequisite(s): IT 202 with a grade of C- or instructor permission
IT
354
Hours
3
ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION – STUDY ABROAD

This is a combined writing theory and writing skills course focusing upon more advanced notions of Italian grammar and on the development of techniques for written expression. It is taught at the Leonardo Da Vinci School in Florence, Italy.

Prerequisite(s): IT 102 and/or permission of the instructor.
IT
356
Hours
3
Adv Grammar Composition

A combined writing theory and writing skills course focusing upon more advanced notions of Italian grammar and on the development of techniques for written expression. May be taken once in Italy and once on campus.

Prerequisite(s): IT 202 with a grade of C- or instructor permission
IT
361
Hours
3
Intro Romance Linguistic

Introduction to linguistic science and its use in describing language in general and the Romance languages in particular.

Prerequisite(s): No prerequisite because this course is taught in English.
IT
364
Hours
3
Masterpieces of Italian Literature in Translation: From the Middle Ages to Early Modernity

Study of major works in Italian literature from Dante to the early modern period.

Prerequisite(s): No prerequisite because the course is taught in English
IT
380
Hours
3
Special Topics

The subject matter varies, and includes "Film and Literature" and "Fascism in Film and Literature" with lectures in English. *No prerequisite necessary for courses offered in English. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite(s): IT 353 or IT 356 with a grade of C- or instructor permission. No prerequisite necessary for those sections offered in English
IT
480
Hours
3
Special Topics

The subject matter varies. May be repeated for credit. Offered according to demand.

Prerequisite(s): IT 353 or IT 356 with a grade of C- or instructor permission. No prerequisite necessary for those sections that are offered in English.
JA
101
FL, HU
Hours
4
Elementary Japanese I

Five hours of instruction per week. Acquisition of elementary Japanese language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

Foreign Language, Humanities
JA
102
FL, HU
Hours
4
Elementary Japanese II

Japanese 102 is the successor of Japanese 101, and it is designed for beginning learners. Students will learn vocabulary and sentence structures for use in essential daily situations through various forms of communicative practice. While continuing to develop students’ communicative competence in Japanese, six cultural topics will be introduced and explored from each chapter of the textbook through short readings, lectures, and videos.

Prerequisite(s): JA 101
Foreign Language, Humanities
JA
201
HU
Hours
3
Intermediate Japanese I

Japanese 201 is the successor of Japanese 102, and it is designed for intermediate learners. Students will learn vocabulary and sentence structures for use in essential daily situations through various forms of communicative practice. While continuing to develop students’ communicative competence in Japanese, five cultural topics will be introduced and explored from each chapter of the textbook through short readings about planning trip in Japan, Japanese and marriage and Japanese host family, lectures, and videos about Japanese famous sightseeing places. A continuation of JA 102.

Prerequisite(s): JA 102
Humanities
JA
202
HU
Hours
3
Intermediate Japanese II

A continuation of JA 201.

Prerequisite(s): JA 201
Humanities
JA
301
Hours
3
Third Year Japanese I

A continuation of JA 202. The course is for students who have a comprehensive grammatical knowledge and are already able to communicate in Japanese. Students will work in this class to improve the accuracy and authenticity of socially correct communication of Japanese. The instructor conducts the class extensively in Japanese whenever possible, and English explanations of the expressions will be minimal. Students are required to communicate entirely in Japanese in class.

Prerequisite(s): Complete/earn a grade of C or higher in JA202
JA
302
Hours
3
Third Year Japanese II

A continuation of JA 301.

Prerequisite(s): Complete a grade of C or higher in JA 301 or consent of instructor
JA
356
W
Hours
3
Traditional Japanese Lit Trans

Introduction to Japanese literature from the earliest times through the Tokugawa period. No knowledge of Japanese is required.

Writing
JA
357
Hours
3
Japanese Literature & Film

Introduction to modern Japanese literature and movie from the Meiji period to the present. No knowledge of Japanese is required. Students will learn historical/technical aspects, and will develop critical thinking skills based on the reading of Japanese stories and viewing of Japanese films and understand the value of Japanese literature, artistic concept in cultural context.

JA
371
Hours
3
Japanese Culture I

This course is for students who need fundamental knowledge of current Japanese culture. The topics include modern history, characteristics of Japanese business, social problems, traditional religious and philosophy of the Japanese people.

Prerequisite(s): JA 102
JA
372
Hours
3
Japanese Culture II

This course is for students who need fundamental knowledge of current Japanese culture. The topics include traditional art forms, Buddhism sculptures, movies, traditional music and theater, subculture and marital arts.

Prerequisite(s): JA 102
JA
390
Hours
3
Topics Japanese Studies

Discussion and research of various topics related to Japanese language/culture. Topics may change each semester, such as KANJI, or traditional and modern Japanese culture including theatrical arts, music, and religious thoughts of Japan. With permission of the program director, this course may be applied toward the Japanese minor.

JA
410
Hours
3
4 Yr Read/Write Japanese

A continuation of JA 302 with emphasis on development of reading and writing skills.

Prerequisite(s): Earn a grade of C or higher in JA 302 or consent of instructor.
JA
411
Hours
3
4th Year Spoken Japanese

A continuation of JA 410 with emphasis on development of reading and writing skills.

Prerequisite(s): Earn a grade of C or higher in JA 410 or consent of instructor
JA
481
Hours
1-4
Directed Readings

The purpose of the course is for students who have an advanced level of proficiency in Japanese to obtain a higher level of Japanese reading and writing ability (equivalent to 日本語能力試験 1級). The instructor will conduct the class in Japanese except for the study of translation / interpretation. Students are required to read short novels, newspaper articles, journals, and stories for specified topics, and discuss in Japanese during the class meetings. Also students write papers in Japanese.

Prerequisite(s): Complete/earn a grade of B- or higher in JA 411.
JA
482
Hours
1-4
Directed Readings

The purpose of the course is for students who have an advanced level of proficiency in Japanese to obtain a higher level of Japanese reading and writing ability (equivalent to 日本語能力試験 1級). The instructor will conduct the class in Japanese except for the study of translation / interpretation. Students are required to read short novels, newspaper articles, journals, and stories for specified topics, and discuss in Japanese during the class meetings. Also required is the writing of papers in Japanese.

Prerequisite(s): JA481 or consent of instructor
KOR
101
FL
Hours
3
Elementary Korean

Contemporary Korean: speaking, reading, and writing. Course involves directed-self-instructional approach in the Critical Languages Center. Students are required to study the textbook and practice with assigned audio visual materials (CDs, DVDs, or computer files). Students have practice sessions three hours per week with a “language trainer” who is a native/near native (or superior level) speaker of the language. Native speakers of this language cannot take this course. Any students with background knowledge of this language must see the CLC director for permission before registering. Not repeatable without permission of the CLC director. Offered each semester.

Foreign Language
KOR
102
FL
Hours
3
Elementary Korean

Contemporary Korean: speaking, reading, and writing. Course involves directed self-instructional approach in the Critical Languages Center. Students are required to study the textbook and practice with assigned audio visual materials (CDs, DVDs, or computer files). Students have practice sessions three hours per week with a “language trainer” who is a native/near native/superior-level speaker of the language. Not repeatable without permission of the CLC director. Offered each semester.

Prerequisite(s): KOR 101
Foreign Language
KOR
201
Hours
3
Intermediate Korean

Continuation of Korean language on the intermediate level. Emphasis is on the development of reading skills and writing proficiency. Offered according to demand. Not repeatable without permission of the CLC director.

Prerequisite(s): KOR 102
KOR
202
Hours
3
Intermediate Korean

Continuation of KOR 201. Emphasis is on the development of reading skills and writing proficiency. Offered according to demand. Not repeatable without permission of the CLC director.

Prerequisite(s): KOR 201
LA
101
FL, HU
Hours
3
Elementary Latin I

Beginning fundamentals of Latin grammar and syntax. Offered in the fall semester.

Foreign Language, Humanities
LA
102
FL, HU
Hours
3
Elementary Latin II

Continued study of the fundamentals of Latin grammar and syntax. Offered in the spring semester.

Prerequisite(s): LA 101
Foreign Language, Humanities
LA
201
HU
Hours
3
Intermed Latin Read I

Introduction to and practice at reading Latin literature. Offered in the fall semester.

Prerequisite(s): LA 102
Humanities
LA
202
HU
Hours
3
Intermed Latin Read II

Selected readings from Latin literature. Offered in the spring semester.

Prerequisite(s): LA 201
Humanities
LA
301
Hours
3
Survey Lit Roman Republ

Readings in Latin literature to the time of Julius Caesar. Offered in the fall semester.

LA
302
Hours
3
Survey Lit Of Empire

Selected readings in later Roman literature. Offered in the spring semester.

LA
490
Hours
3
Readings In Latin Literature

The subject matter varies. May be repeated for credit. Offered according to demand.

Prerequisite(s): LA 301 or LA 302
MATH
005
Hours
3
Introductory Algebra

Brief review of arithmetic operations and basic algebraic concepts: factoring, operations with polynomials and rational expressions, linear equations and word problems, graphing linear equations, simplification of expressions involving radicals or negative exponents, and elementary work with quadratic equations. Grades are reported as pass/fail.

MATH
100
Hours
3
Intermediate Algebra

Prerequisites: Placement and two units of college-preparatory mathematics; if a student has previously been placed in MATH 005, a grade of "C-" or higher in MATH 005 is required. Intermediate-level course including work on functions, graphs, linear equations and inequalities, quadratic equations, systems of equations, and operations with exponents and radicals. The solution of word problems is stressed. NOT APPLICABLE to UA Core Curriculum mathematics requirement. Grades are reported as A, B, C or NC (No Credit).

Prerequisite(s): UA Math Placement Test Score of 190-309 or ACT Math Subscore of 18 or old SAT Math Subscore of 440 or new SAT Math Subscore of 480 or MATH 005
MATH
110
MA
Hours
3
Finite Mathematics

This course is intended to give an overview of topics in finite mathematics with applications. This course covers mathematics of finance, logic, set theory, elementary probability and statistics. This course does not provide sufficient background for students who will need to take Precalculus Algebra or Calculus.

Prerequisite(s): UA Math Placement Test Score of 250-600 or ACT Math Subscore of 18 or old SAT Math Subscore of 440 or new SAT Math Subscore of 480 or MATH 100
Mathematics
MATH
112
MA
Hours
3
Precalculus Algebra

Prerequisites: Placement and three units of college-preparatory mathematics; if a student has previously been placed in MATH 100, a grade of "C-" or higher in MATH 100 is required. A higher-level course emphasizing functions including polynomial functions, rational functions, and the exponential and logarithmic functions. Graphs of these functions are stressed. The course also includes work on equations, inequalities, systems of equations, the binomial theorem, and the complex and rational roots of polynomials. Applications are stressed. Grades are reported as A, B, C or NC (No Credit).

Prerequisite(s): UA Math Placement Test Score of 310-439 or ACT Math Subscore of 24 or old SAT Math Subscore of 560 or new SAT Math Subscore of 580 or MATH 100
Mathematics
MATH
113
MA
Hours
3
Precalculus Trigonometry

Prerequisite: If a student has previously been placed into MATH 112, a grade of "C-" or higher in MATH 112 is required. Continuation of MATH 112. The course includes study of trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities and trigonometric equations. Complex numbers, De Moivre's Theorem, polar coordinates, vectors and other topics in algebra are also addressed, including conic sections, sequences and series. Grades are reported as A, B, C or NC (No Credit).

Prerequisite(s): MATH 112
Mathematics
MATH
115
MA
Hours
3
Precalc Algebra & Trig

Prerequisite: Placement and a strong background in college-preparatory mathematics, including one-half unit in trigonometry. Properties and graphs of exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions are emphasized. Also includes trigonometric identities, polynomial and rational functions, inequalities, systems of equations, vectors, and polar coordinates. Grades are reported as A, B, C, or NC (No credit). Degree credit will not be granted for both MATH 115 and MATH 112 or MATH 113.

Prerequisite(s): UA Math Placement Test Score of 370-439 or ACT Math Subscore of 28 or old SAT Math Subscore of 630 or new SAT Math Subscore of 650
Mathematics
MATH
121
MA
Hours
3
Calculus & Applications

Prerequisite: MATH 112 or equivalent. If a student has previously been placed in MATH 112, a grade of "C-" or higher in MATH 112 is required. A brief overview of calculus primarily for students in the Culverhouse College of Commerce and Business Administration. This course does not provide sufficient background for students who will need higher levels of Calculus. Note: This course does not satisfy the requirement for MATH 125 or 126. Degree credit will not be granted for both MATH 121 and MATH 125 or MATH 145.

Prerequisite(s): UA Math Placement Test Score of 440-600 or ACT Math Subscore of 30 or old SAT Math Subscore of 680 or new SAT Math Subscore of 710 or (MATH 112 and MATH 113) or MATH 115
Mathematics
MATH
125
MA
Hours
4
Calculus I

This is the first of three courses in the basic calculus sequence. Topics include the limit of a function; the derivative of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions; and the definite integral. Applications of the derivative are covered in detail, including approximations of error using differentials, maxima and minima problems, and curve sketching using calculus. There is also a brief review of selected precalculus topics at the beginning of the course. Degree credit will not be granted for both MATH 121 and MATH 125 or MATH 145.

Prerequisite(s): UA Math Placement Test Score of 440-600 or ACT Math Subscore of 30 or old SAT Math Subscore of 680 or new SAT Math Subscore of 710 or (MATH 112 and MATH 113) or MATH 115
Mathematics
MATH
126
MA
Hours
4
Calculus II

This is the second of three courses in the basic calculus sequence. Topics include vectors and the geometry of space, applications of integration, integration techniques, L'Hopital's Rule, improper integrals, parametric equations, polar coordinates, conic sections and infinite series.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 125 or MATH 131 or MATH 145
Mathematics
MATH
145
MA, UH
Hours
4
Honors Calculus I

This course covers the same material as MATH 125 but in a depth appropriate for honors students. It is the first course in the three part honors calculus sequence for students majoring in mathematics, science or engineering. Topics include limits, continuity, differentiation, applications of differentiation, and integration. Applications of the derivative are covered in detail, including approximation of errors using differentials, maxima and minima problems, curve sketching, optimization problems, and Newton’s method. Topics on integration include Riemann sums, properties of definite integrals, integration by substitution and integrals involving logarithmic exponential and trigonometric functions.

Prerequisite(s): PREREQUISITE: MATH 145 Placement GENERAL REQUIREMENTS: ( ACT2 31 to 36 May not be taken concurrently. ) or ( SAT2 700 to 800 May not be taken concurrently. ) or ( SAT7 730 to 800 May not be taken concurrently. ) or ( Course or Test: MATH 112 Minimum Grade of B- May not be taken concurrently. and Course or Test: MATH 113 Minimum Grade of B- May not be taken concurrently. ) or ( Course or Test: MATH 115 Minimum Grade of B- May not be taken concurrently. )
Mathematics, University Honors
MATH
146
MA, UH
Hours
4
Honors Calculus II

This course covers the same material as MATH 126 but in a depth appropriate for honors students. It is the second course in the three part honors calculus sequence for students majoring in mathematics, science or engineering. Topics include vectors and the geometry of space, L'Hospital's Rule, applications of integration, integration techniques, improper integrals, infinite series, conic sections, plane curves, parametric equations, and polar coordinates.

Prerequisite(s): A grade of B- or higher in MATH 125 or MATH 145 or a score of 4 or 5 on AP Calculus AB or a score of 4 or 5 on AP Calculus BC: AB Subscore.
Mathematics, University Honors
MATH
208
Hours
3
Number And Operations

Arithmetic of whole numbers and integers, fractions, proportion and ratio, and place value. Class activities initiate investigations underlying mathematical structure in arithmetic processes and include hands-on manipulatives for modeling solutions. Emphasis is on the explanation of the mathematical thought process. Students are required to verbalize explanations and thought processes and to write reflections on assigned readings on the teaching and learning of mathematics.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 100 or MATH 110 or MATH 112 or MATH 113 or MATH 125
MATH
209
Hours
3
Geometry & Measurement

Properties of two- and three-dimensional shapes, rigid motion transformations, similarity, spatial reasoning, and the process and techniques of measurement. Class activities initiate investigations of underlying mathematical structure in the exploration of shape and space. Emphasis is on the explanation of the mathematical thought process. Technology specifically designed to facilitate geometric explorations is integrated throughout the course.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 208
MATH
210
Hours
3
Data Analysis Probabil Stats

Data analysis, statistics, and probability, including collecting, displaying/representing, exploring, and interpreting data, probability models, and applications. Focus is on statistics for problem solving and decision making, rather than calculation. Class activities deepen the understanding of fundamental issues in learning to work with data Technology specifically designed for data-driven investigations and statistical analysis is integrated throughout the course.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 208
MATH
227
MA
Hours
4
Calculus III

This is the third of three courses in the basic calculus sequence. Topics include: vector functions and motion in space; functions of two or more variables and their partial derivatives; and applications of partial derivatives (including Lagrange multipliers), quadric surfaces, multiple integration (including Jacobian), line integrals, Green's Theorem, vector analysis, surface integrals and Stokes' Theorem.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 146 or MATH 126 or MATH 132
Mathematics
MATH
237
MA
Hours
3
Introduction to Linear Algebra

Fundamentals of linear algebra and matrix theory are covered. Topics include vectors in Euclidean spaces, solving systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, inverses, determinants, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Also vector spaces and the basic notions of span, subspace, linear independence, basis, dimension, linear transformation, kernel and range are considered. Use of linear algebra software is introduced. Theory plays a significant role in this course - both in lectures and tests.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 126 or MATH 146
Mathematics
MATH
238
MA
Hours
3
Appld Diff Equations I

Introduction to analytic and numerical methods for solving differential equations. Topics include numerical methods and qualitative behavior of first order equations, analytic techniques for separable and linear equations, applications to population models and motion problems; techniques for solving higher order linear differential equations with constant coefficients (including undetermined coefficients, reduction of order, and variation of parameters), applications to physical models; the Laplace transform (including intial value problems with discontinuous forcing functions). Use of mathematics software is an integral part of the course.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 126 or MATH 146
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: MATH 227 or MATH 247
Mathematics
MATH
247
MA, UH
Hours
4
Honors Calculus III

This course covers the same material as MATH 227 but in a depth appropriate for honors students. It is the third course in the three part honors calculus sequence for students majoring in mathematics, science or engineering. Topics include analytic geometry in space, vector-valued functions and motion in space, functions of two or more variables and their partial derivatives, applications of partial differentiation (including Lagrangian multipliers), quadric and cylindrical surfaces, and multiple integration (including Jacobian) and applications, line integrals, Green's Theorem, curl and divergence, surface integrals, and Stokes’ Theorem.

Prerequisite(s): A grade of B- or higher in MATH 126 or MATH 146 or a score of 4 or 5 on AP Calculus BC exam.
Mathematics, University Honors
MATH
300
Hours
3
Intro Numerical Analysis

Credit will not be granted for both MATH 300 and MATH 411. A beginning course in numerical analysis. Topics include number representation in various bases, error analysis, location of roots of equations, numerical integration, interpolation and numerical differentiation, systems of linear equations, approximations by spline functions, and approximation methods for first-order ordinary differential equations and for systems of such equations.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 227 or MATH 247; and CS 100 or CS 104 or CS 150 or AEM 249 or ECE 285 or CBH 101
MATH
301
W
Hours
3
Discrete Mathematics

An introductory course that primarily covers logic, recursion, induction, modeling, algorithmic thinking, counting techniques, combinatorics, and graph theory. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 125 or MATH 145
Writing
MATH
302
Hours
1
Topics in Discrete Mathematics

A supplemental course in discrete mathematics covering select topics of interest in computer science. Topics include graphs and trees, finite state automata and regular expressions, efficiency of algorithms.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 301
MATH
343
Hours
3
Appl Diff Equations II

Continuation of MATH 238. Topics include series solutions of differential equations, the method of Frobenius, Fourier series, method of separation of variables for partial differential equations, elementary boundary value problems for the Laplace, heat and wave equations, an introduction to Sturm-Liouville boundary value problems, and stability of autonomous systems. Usually offered in the spring semester.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 238
MATH
355
Hours
3
Theory Of Probability

The foundations of the theory of probability, laws governing random phenomena and their practical applications in other fields. Topics include: probability spaces; properties of probability set functions; conditional probability; and an introduction to combinatorics, discrete random variables, expectation of discrete random variables, Chebyshev's Inequality, continuous variables and their distribution functions, and special densities.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 227 or MATH 247
MATH
371
Hours
3
Advanced Linear Algebra

Topics include inner product spaces, norms, self adjoint and normal operators, orthogonal and unitary operators, orthogonal projections and the spectral theorem, bilinear and quadratic forms, generalized eigenvectors, and Jordan canonical form.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 237
MATH
382
Hours
3
Advanced Calculus

Further study of calculus with emphasis on theory. Topics include limits and continuity of functions of several variables; partial derivatives; transformations and mappings; vector functions and fields; vector differential operators; the derivative of a function of several variables as a linear transformation; Jacobians; change of variables in multiple integrals; line and surface integrals; and Green's, Stokes', and Divergence Theorems.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 227 or MATH 247; and MATH 237.
MATH
402
Hours
3
History Of Mathematics

Survey of the development of some of the central ideas of modern mathematics, with emphasis on the cultural context. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

MATH
403
Hours
3
Adv Math Connections & Devlpmn

Explore the interconnections between the algebraic, analytic, and geometric areas of mathematics with a focus on properties of various number systems, importance of functions, and the relationship of algebraic structures to solving analytic equations. This exploration will also include the development and sequential nature of each of these branches of mathematics and how it relates to the various levels within the algebra mathematics curriculum.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 237 and MATH 301
MATH
404
Hours
1
Topics Math Secondary Teachers

This is a seminar style course focusing on various mathematical topics related to the high school curriculum. Topics will vary depending upon instructor.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 301
MATH
405
Hours
3
Geometry For Teachers

This course will give an overview of geometry from a modern point of view. Axiomatic, analytic, and transformation approaches to geometry will be used. The relationship between Euclidean geometry, the geometry of complex numbers, and trigonometry will be emphasized.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 403
MATH
409
Hours
3
Advanced Data Analysis

Concepts and techniques of posing questions and collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data. Topics include: univariate and bivariate statistics, probability, simulation, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 125 and ST 260
MATH
410
Hours
3
Numerical Linear Algebra

Further study of matrix theory, emphasizing computational aspects. Topics include direct solution of linear systems, analysis of errors in numerical methods for solving linear systems, least-squares problems, orthogonal and unitary transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and singular value decomposition.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 237 or MATH 257
MATH
411
Hours
3
Numerical Analysis I

Credit will not be granted for both MATH 411 and MATH 300. A rigorous introduction to numerical methods, formal definition of algorithms, and error analysis and their implementation on a digital computer. Topics include interpolation, roots, linear equations, integration and differential equations, and orthogonal function approximation.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 237 or MATH 257; and MATH 238; and CS 150 or GES 126
MATH
412
Hours
3
Numerical Analysis II

This is the second course in the numerical analysis sequence for senior students in mathematics, science, or engineering. Topics include numerical methods for solving boundary value problems, ordinary differential equations, and partial differential equations, multistep methods for initial value problems, and approximation theory (least-squares problems, orthogonal polynomials).

Prerequisite(s): MATH 411 or equivalent, and ability to program in a high-level programming language (MATLAB, C++, or FORTRAN).
MATH
420
Hours
3
Linear Optimization Theory

In-depth theoretical development and analysis of linear programming. Topics include formulation of linear programs, various simplex methods, duality, sensitivity analysis, transportation and networks and various geometric concepts.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 237
MATH
421
Hours
3
Non-Linear Optimization Theory

In-depth theoretical development and analysis of non linear programming with emphasis on traditional constrained and unconstrained non linear programming methods and an introduction to modern search algorithms.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 237 or MATH 257
MATH
422
Hours
3
Mathematics For Finance I

Topics include the basic no-arbitrage principle, binomial model, time value of money, money market, risky assets such as stocks, portfolio management, forward and future contracts, and interest rates.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 227 or MATH 247 and MATH 355
MATH
432
Hours
3
Graph Theory & Applictns

Survey of several of the main ideas of general theory with applications to network theory. Topics include oriented and nonoriented linear graphs, spanning trees, branching and connectivity, accessibility, planar graphs, networks and flows, matching, and applications.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 237 or MATH 257
MATH
441
Hours
3
Boundary Value Problems

Methods of solving the classical second-order linear partial differential equations: Laplace's equation, the heat equation, and the wave equation, together with appropriate boundary or initial conditions. Usually offered in the fall semester. Prerequisite: MATH 343, or consent of the department.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 343
MATH
442
Hours
3
Integral Transf & Asympt

Complex variable methods, integral transforms, asymptotic expansions, WKB method, Airy's equation, matched asymptotics, and boundary layers.

Prerequisite(s): C- or higher in MATH 441
MATH
451
Hours
3
Math Stats W/Applictn I

Introduction to mathematical statistics. Topics include bivariate and multivariate probability distributions, functions of random variables, sampling distributions and the central limit theorem, concepts and properties of point estimators, various methods of point estimation, interval estimation, tests of hypotheses and Neyman-Pearson lemma with some applications.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 237 and MATH 355
MATH
452
Hours
3
Math Stats W/Applictn II

Further applications of the Neyman-Pearson Lemma, Likelihood Ratio tests, Chi-square test for goodness of fit, estimation and test of hypotheses for linear statistical models, analysis of variance, analysis of enumerative data, and some topics in nonparametric statistics.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 451
MATH
457
Hours
3
Stochastic Processes I

Introduction to the fundamental concepts and applications of stochastic processes: Markov chains, continuous-time Markov chains, Poisson and renewal processes, and Brownian motion. Applications include queueing theory, communication networks, and finance.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 451
MATH
460
Hours
3
Intro Differential Geom

Introduction to basic classical notions in differential geometry: curvature, torsion, geodesic curves, geodesic parallelism, differential manifold, tangent space, vector field, Lie derivative, Lie algebra, Lie group, exponential map, and representation of a Lie group. Usually offered in the spring semester.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 486
MATH
465
Hours
3
Intro General Topology

Basic notions in topology that can be used in other disciplines in mathematics. Topics include topological spaces, open sets, basis for a topology, continuous functions, seperation axioms, compactness, connectedness, product spaces, quotient spaces.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 486
MATH
466
Hours
3
Intro Algebraic Topology

Homotopy, fundamental groups, covering spaces, covering maps, and basic homology theory, including the Eilenberg Steenrod axioms.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 465
MATH
470
Hours
3
Prin Modern Algebra I

A first course in abstract algebra. Topics include: groups, permutation groups, Cayley's theorem, finite abelian groups, isomorphism theorems and Lagrange’s theorem. Usually offered in the spring semester.

Prerequisite(s): A grade of C- or higher in MATH 237.
MATH
471
Hours
3
Prin Modern Algebra II

An introduction to ring theory. Topics include rings, polynomial rings, matrix rings, modules, fields and semi-simple rings. Usually offered in the fall semester.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 470
MATH
474
Hours
3
Cryptography

Introduction to rapidly growing area of cryptography, an application of algebra, especially number theory. Usually offered in the Fall semester.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 470
MATH
485
Hours
3
Intro Complex Variables

Some basic notions in complex analysis. Topics include analytic functions, complex integration, infinite series, contour integration, and conformal mappings.

MATH
486
Hours
3
Introduction to Real Analysis I

Rigorous development of the calculus of real variables. Topics include topology of the real line, sequences, limits, continuity, and differentiation.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 237
MATH
487
Hours
3
Introduction to Real Analysis II

Riemann integration, introduction to Reimann-Stieltjes integration, series of constants and convergence tests, sequences and series of functions, uniform convergence, power series, Taylor series, and the Weierstrass Approximation Theorem.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 486
MATH
495
Hours
1-3
Seminar Directed Reading

Offered as needed.

MATH
499
Hours
1-3
Undergraduate Research Experience

Independent or collaborative research experience in mathematics.

MDGR
101
FL
Hours
3
Elementary Modern Greek

Contemporary modern Greek speaking, reading and writing. Course involves mixed self-instructional approach in the Critical Languages Center. Students are required to study the textbook and practice with assigned audio visual materials (CDs, DVDs or computer files). Students have practice sessions three hours per week with a language trainer who is a native/near-native (or superior) speaker of the language. Native speakers of this language cannot take this course. Any students with background knowledge of this language must see the CLC director before registering. Not repeatable without permission of the CLC director. Offered each semester.

Foreign Language
MDGR
102
FL
Hours
3
Elementary Modern Greek

Contemporary modern Greek speaking, reading and writing. Course involves mixed self-instructional approach in the Critical Languages Center. Students are required to study the textbook and practice with assigned audio visual materials (CDs, DVDs or computer files). Students have practice sessions three hours per week with a language trainer who is a native/near-native (or superior) speaker of the language. Not repeatable without permission of CLC director. Offered each semester.

Foreign Language
MDGR
201
Hours
3
Intermed Modern Gr

Continuation of modern Greek on the intermediate level. Emphasis is on the development of reading skills and writing proficiency. Not repeatable without permission of the CLC director. Offered according to demand.

Prerequisite(s): MDGR 102
MDGR
202
Hours
3
Intermed Modern Greek

Continuation of MDGR 201. Emphasis is on the development of reading skills and writing proficiency. Not repeatable without permission of the CLC director. Offered according to demand.

Prerequisite(s): MDGR 102
MLC
155
Hours
3
Freshman Seminar

No description available.

MS
304
Hours
4
Marine Geology

Credit earned in this course may not be applied to the requirements of the biological sciences major or minor. Field sampling techniques, laboratory analysis of sediments, topography, sediments, and history of the world oceans.

MS
306
Hours
4
Marine Biology

Survey of the invertebrates, vertebrates, and marine plants as communities, with emphasis on local examples.

MS
408
Hours
4
Marine Invertebrate Zoology

Comparative study of the major marine invertebrate phyla, protozoa through protochordates. The focus is on their morphology, physiology, ecology, and phylogenetic relationships.

MS
419
Hours
4
Marine Ecology

Bioenergetics, community structure, population dynamics, predation, competition, and specialization in marine ecosystems.

MS
433
Hours
2
Coastal Zone Management

Review of ecological features, physical management policies for coastal communities, and a description of relevant federal and state programs.

MS
448
Hours
4
Intro Oceanography

A general introduction to the oceans, with emphasis on chemical, physical, and geological processes and their relation to biological systems.

MS
452
Hours
4
Marine Vertebrate Zoology

Systematics, zoogeography, and ecology of marine vertebrates.

MS
453
Hours
4
Marine Botany

Reproduction, taxonomy, systematics, distribution, and ecology of the major marine plant groups.

MS
497
Hours
1-4
Special Topics

A marine science topic not covered in other courses. The credit hours and format are determined as appropriate to the topic. Offered according to demand and instructor availability.

MUA
010
Hours
0
Music Convocation

Music Convocation.

MUA
100
Hours
1
Class Voice Beginning

No description available.

MUA
121
Hours
1
Class Piano I

No description available.

MUA
122
Hours
1
Class Piano II

No description available.

MUA
123
Hours
1
Class Piano III

No description available.

MUA
124
Hours
1
Class Piano IV

No description available.

MUA
129
Hours
0.5-1
Guitar (Non-Majors)

No description available.

MUA
130
Hours
0.5-1
Harp (Non-Majors)

No description available.

MUA
131
Hours
0.5-1
Piano (Non-Majors)

No description available.

MUA
132
Hours
0.5-1
Organ (Non-Majors)

No description available.

MUA
133
Hours
0.5-1
Harpsichord (Non-Majors)

No description available.

MUA
134
Hours
0.5-1
Voice (Non-Majors)

No description available.

MUA
135
Hours
0.5-1
Violin (Non-Majors)

No description available.

MUA
136
Hours
0.5-1
Viola (Non-Majors)

No description available.

MUA
137
Hours
0.5-1
Cello (Non-Majors)

No description available.

MUA
138
Hours
0.5-1
String Bass (Non-Majors)

No description available.

MUA
139
Hours
0.5-1
Flute (Non-Majors)

No description available.

MUA
140
Hours
0.5-1
Oboe (Non-Majors)

No description available.

MUA
141
Hours
0.5-1
Bassoon (Non-Majors)

No description available.

MUA
142
Hours
0.5-1
Clarinet (Non-Majors)

No description available.

MUA
143
Hours
0.5-1
Saxophone (Non-Majors)

No description available.

MUA
144
Hours
0.5-1
Trumpet (Non-Majors)

No description available.

MUA
145
Hours
0.5-1
French Horn (Non-Majors)

No description available.

MUA
146
Hours
0.5-1
Trombone (Non-Majors)

No description available.

MUA
147
Hours
0.5-1
Euphonium (Non-Majors)

No description available.

MUA
148
Hours
0.5-1
Tuba (Non-Majors)

No description available.

MUA
149
Hours
0.5-1
Percussion (Non-Majors)

No description available.

MUA
150
Hours
0-1
Symphony Orchestra

Applied Ensemble at the undergraduate level.

MUA
151
Hours
0-1
Alabama Brass Choir

Applied ensemble for brass musicians. Permission of instructor is required.

MUA
152
Hours
0-1
Wind Ensemble

Applied Ensemble at the undergraduate level.

MUA
153
Hours
1
Marching Band

Applied Ensemble at the undergraduate level.

MUA
154
Hours
0-1
Symphonic Band

Applied Ensemble at the undergraduate level.

MUA
155
Hours
0-1
Trombone Choir

Applied ensemble for trombone students at the freshmen level.

MUA
156
Hours
0-1
Percussion Ensemble

Applied Ensemble at the undergraduate level.

MUA
157
Hours
0-1
Campus Band

Applied ensemble at the freshmen level.

MUA
158
Hours
0-1
Contemp Music Ensemble

Applied Ensemble at the undergraduate level.

MUA
159
Hours
0-1
Jazz Ensembles

Applied Ensemble at the und