Randall Research Scholars (RRS) Courses

RRS
101
UH
Hours
4
Randall Research Scholars Freshman Seminar 1

Taken by first-year students in the Randall Research Scholars Program, this course provides an accelerated introduction to computer hardware and software. Open only to students admitted to the Randall Research Scholars Program.

University Honors
RRS
102
C, UH
Hours
4
Randall Research Scholars Freshman Seminar 2

Taken by first-year students in the Randall Research Scholars Program, this second freshman year course provides an accelerated introduction to additional software as well as project management techniques. Open only to students admitted to the Randall Research Scholars Program. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): RRS 101 with a minimum grade of B.
Computer Science, University Honors
RRS
201
C, UH
Hours
3
Randall Research Scholars Sophomore Research Seminar 1

Sophomore RRS research seminar where students work as undergraduate research assistants with faculty members on computer-oriented research projects. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of RRS 102 with a minimum grade of B+.
Computer Science, University Honors
RRS
202
UH
Hours
3
Randall Research Scholars Sophomore Research Seminar 2

Sophomore RRS research seminar where students work as undergraduate research assistants with faculty members on computer-oriented research projects.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of RRS 201.
University Honors
RRS
301
UH
Hours
3
Randall Research Scholars Junior Research Seminar 1

Junior RRS seminar where students work as undergraduate research assistants with faculty members on computer-oriented research projects.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of RRS 201.
University Honors
RRS
302
UH
Hours
3
Randall Research Scholars Junior Research Seminar 2

Junior RRS seminar where students work as undergraduate research assistants with faculty members on computer-oriented research projects.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of RRS 201.
University Honors
RRS
425
UH
Hours
1-6
Randall Research Scholars Research Project

This is an independent study course, with variable credit. Students develop a research project contract with semester project deliverables to the RRS office by the second Friday of the semester. Students meet with their project supervisors on a regular basis throughout the semester. Prior approval from the RRS Program Director is required to register for this course.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of RRS 201.
University Honors
RRS
451
UH
Hours
3
Randall Research Scholars Senior Research Seminar 1

Senior RRS seminar where students work as undergraduate research assistants with faculty members on computer-oriented research projects.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of RRS 201.
University Honors
RRS
452
UH
Hours
3
Randall Research Scholars Senior Research Seminar 2

Senior RRS seminar where students work as undergraduate research assistants with faculty members on computer-oriented research projects.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of RRS 201.
University Honors

University Honors Program (UH) Courses

UH
100
UH
Hours
2
Honors Year One: Honors Connections

Honors Connections introduces first-year students to the UA Honors College experience. The aim of this course is to aid each student in finding and interrogating their place within the Honors College, the University of Alabama and the greater community. Students will learn and practice the key concepts of engaged scholarship, including critical and creative thinking, ethical and empathic dialogue, and collaborative and inclusive leadership. Students will gain a practical understanding of the Honors College and their role within it, while also building relationships that foster continued participation in the kinship of scholars.

University Honors
UH
101
HU, UH
Hours
3
Survey: Values & Society

These courses provide an opportunity for students to engage in conversation and experiences relating to the interaction of society and values. The majority of these courses require a service-learning component. Satisfies HU core curriculum designation.

Humanities, University Honors
UH
102
UH
Hours
1
Freshman Common Book Experience

The Freshman Common Book Experience involves our communal discussion of issues raised in the selected book for the incoming freshman class. The overall theme of the course is to introduce students to the seminar experience – one of the core principles of an Honors education. The skills that are practiced in a seminar provide the opportunity to grow in the timeless method of learning where deep, critical reading is followed by a discussion of texts. Further, the seminar provides the opportunity for students to practice speaking about and forming critiques of the ideas encountered. In a seminar, there is no final authority on matters of discussion. Instead, the purpose is learning to be a better critical thinker, listener, and interpreter through the seminar experience itself.

University Honors
UH
103
UH
Hours
1
Honors Action

In this six day, one-credit hour introductory course, students are immersed in the foundations of the Honors College and community engagement. Students attend a daily lecture series followed by small discussions. The guest lectures and discussions address issues such as poverty, cultural capital, engaged citizenship, and service learning. In addition to the lecture series and small group discussions, students participate in daily service-learning projects at local public schools. The Honors College common book, in addition to supplementary resources as provided, will be assigned reading for this course and will link to the course themes from the lectures and service projects.

University Honors
UH
105
SB, UH
Hours
3
Honors Mentoring

Honors Mentoring provides the dedicated student with the intellectual opportunity to acquire the content knowledge and refine interpersonal skills necessary to effectively mentor at-risk elementary school students. It challenges students to look beyond their own perspectives, assumptions and experiences and embrace the interconnectedness of our society.

Social and Behavioral Sciences, University Honors
UH
110
UH
Hours
2
Honors Engagement

Honors Engagement introduces first-year students who have completed their first semester of study to the UA Honors College experience. The aim of this course is to aid each student in finding and interrogating their place within the Honors College, the University of Alabama and the greater community. Students will learn and practice the key concepts of engaged scholarship, including critical and creative thinking, ethical and empathetic dialogue, and collaborative and inclusive leadership. Students will gain a practical understanding of the Honors College and their role within it, while also building relationships that foster continued participation in the kinship of scholars. Instruction will include lecture, guest speakers, and small group discussions with Honors College student mentors. Student reading, writing, and reflection will be emphasized and connected to the examination of the Honors College and wider academic communities.

University Honors
UH
111
UH
Hours
1
Honors Common Book

In this course, students will study and discuss the Honors Common Book (chosen annually).

Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: UH 100 or UH 110; concurrent enrollment allowed
University Honors
UH
120
UH
Hours
1-3
Honors Explorations

These courses provide an opportunity for students to explore diverse topics within the Honors College framework. They do not carry core curriculum designation.

University Honors
UH
121
FA, UH
Hours
1
Leadership Lessons from Jazz

Through Frank Barrett’s Yes to the Mess and Wynton Marsalis' Moving to Higher Ground, we will explore examples of how the world’s best, most admired leaders not only survive and thrive in today’s rapidly changing world, they create and innovate by leading their teams using the same principles and philosophies that jazz musicians do. We will explore how these principles, philosophies and actions, at the core of jazz music and culture, can help you become a better, more successful leader, and to be more stable in an increasingly unstable world. Experiences with the actual music are a bonus, but at the same time, are necessary and integral to understanding how these concepts apply to non-musical environments.

Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: UH 100 or UH 110 (concurrent enrollment is fine)
Fine Arts, University Honors
UH
129
UH
Hours
1-6
Honors Special Topics

Special Topics.

Prerequisite(s): UH 100 or UH 110
University Honors
UH
140
HU, UH
Hours
3
Narratives of Change

Incorporating the Honors College Common Book experience, this course will explore how stories and storytelling connect people, create cultural understanding, and effect change. We will develop a vocabulary for discussing the relationships between narratives and social change and analyze written and oral narratives and the social and historical contexts that surround them. We will also explore how we shape and interact with narratives in our own lives, examining the question, “Who are you?”.

Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: UH 100 or UH 110
Humanities, University Honors
UH
141
HU, UH
Hours
3
Work, Play, and Meaning

This course explores how work and leisure influence our everyday lives. Are we governed by the necessity of work, while we pursue momentary havens of leisure? Or, is it the other way around? Is it because of the necessity of leisure in our lives that we pursue work at all? When are we most ourselves? From Nietzsche’s The Birth of Tragedy which explored the antagonism between the Apollonian and Dionysian spirits, to Max Weber’s The Protestant Work Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, to modern movies such as Office Space, the tensions between, not just work and leisure, but ultimately meaning as well, provide productive spaces for exploration.

Prerequisite(s): UH 100 or UH 110
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: UH 100 or UH 110
Humanities, University Honors
UH
155
FS, HU, UH
Hours
3
Freshman Seminar

These courses provide an opportunity for freshmen to engage in discussion and exploration of various topics that change each semester. Satisfies HU core curriculum designation.

Freshmen Seminar, Humanities, University Honors
UH
180
UH
Hours
3
Mosaic: An Experimental Multimedia Project

An experimental magazine class that produces, from scratch, an online magazine, website and social media. Students can specialize in writing, editing, graphic design, photography/videography and/or website or social media. The class also helps both on and off campus organizations with multimedia projects that need such expertise as a support service. Students also focus on examining the nature of the communication functions of their creative work with other Mosaic students and with non-creative sources and subjects they interact with in their work. Student staff will work with the aid of UA staff/faculty instructors and advisers.

Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: UH 100 or UH 110
University Honors
UH
200
UH
Hours
2
Life as a Scholar

This course takes "the idea of a scholar" as its theme. Students will examine definitions of education and the university, contrasts and conflicts for students and scholars within academic life, and the "life of the mind" conceptualization of higher education as preparation for lifelong learning. These themes will be explored through detailed readings and class discussions. Moreover, it includes a strong component of comparing and contrasting our readings and class discussions with scholarly life at the University of Alabama, both current and historical.

Prerequisite(s): UH 100 or UH 110
University Honors
UH
201
HU, IH, UH
Hours
3
Classics & Western Culture

This course introduces students to the western literary canon from the ancient to the medieval period. Writers to be studied include Homer, Sophocles, Virgil, and Dante. Satisfies HU core curriculum designation.

Humanities, International Honors, University Honors
UH
204
UH
Hours
3
Classics & African Culture

Examines the impact of the classics on African culture, focusing on reading and writing about the concept of identity in African civilizations and cultures. Students will become familiar with classic works that represent current themes in African culture and societies such as oral tradition, use of language, community, post-colonial influence, and gender roles.

University Honors
UH
205
HU, UH
Hours
3
Social Foundations of Community Engagement

As a “prelude” to service learning, students will understand the philosophical structure of “public goods” (e.g., education, health care, housing, etc.) and how they relate to specific needs in public spaces which are used for the betterment of communities. Students will explore the possible causes of political, educational, social, and economic inequalities as well as the benefits, responsibilities and limits of the service response to public problems. The course provides a basic understanding of what the purpose of “public goods” are and how society actualizes these currencies.

Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: UH 200
Humanities, University Honors
UH
206
UH
Hours
1
Foundations of Engaged Scholarship Development

Students will understand the philosophy of education as it relates to the building of curriculum and pedagogy. Students will be exposed to the foundations of education in American Society. Students will be required to spend 5 hours in Tuscaloosa City and County Public School Systems (background check required). This is a 1 hour credit course.

Prerequisite(s): UH 205
University Honors
UH
208
UH
Hours
3
The Scholar’s Life after Graduation

What’s next for you after graduation? Is it graduate or professional school or will you be headed into the workforce? Do you have a plan for how to develop and market your most successful personal and professional self? This course will provide students with the knowledge and resources needed to prepare for life after their undergraduate academic career. Students will explore concepts of career readiness, articulate their personal strengths/weaknesses/values, set and pursue personal and professional goals, and develop a strong professional portfolio. This course also seeks to help students understand the importance of personal branding and networking, effective communication, collaboration with an array of persons and backgrounds, emotional intelligence, and leadership.

Prerequisite(s): UH 100 or UH 110
University Honors
UH
210
FA, UH
Hours
3
Honors Fine Arts

An interdisciplinary approach to the fine arts; content focus and structure vary with instructor. Satisfies FA core curriculum designation.

Fine Arts, University Honors
UH
211
SB, UH
Hours
3
Power

This course will focus on the notion of cultural and social power. Course materials will investigate historical and contemporary negotiations of power and how power is disseminated within cultural contexts. Students will be asked to critically examine how individual power and systemic power operate in their own lives. This critique will certainly begin with an examination of the students own identity and agency within their contexts. The course is concerned primarily with social structures, processes, institutions and how they hold and disseminate power.

Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: UH 200
Social and Behavioral Sciences, University Honors
UH
215
HU, UH
Hours
3
Moral Forum

This class seeks to introduce University Honors Program students to moral discourse and civil deliberation via the analysis of one particular controversial moral resolution. Student teams will then participate in the Moral Forum Tournament, where they will be required to use ethical theories to argue for and against the resolution. The moral issue to be examined in the course changes each semester. Topics are based on current events that offer varied, balanced arguments from multiple ethical perspectives.

Prerequisite(s): UH 200
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: UH 200
Humanities, University Honors
UH
221
FA, UH
Hours
3
Improvisation in Life: Concepts, Techniques, and Philosophy of Improvisation Through Music

A course in the practicality / functionality of improvisation via sound with an eye toward philosophical aspects of improvisation in all the arts and the relationship to other non-arts related disciplines. The goal is to generate creativity and new perspectives in the student’s primary course of study and life, in general, by exploring the art of improvisation.

Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: UH 200
Fine Arts, University Honors
UH
222
FA, UH
Hours
3
Art for Life's Sake

The Art for Life’s Sake course is an exploration of the artistic process and its application in everyday life. Our primary goals are to study, communicate, and increase the practical application and implementation of art philosophy, core concepts, and principles of creation into both academics and everyday life; synthesizing creativity, open-mindedness, authenticity, and innovation into a holistic, mindful approach, with a concerted effort to increase not only human technological and physical progress, but also psychological freedom, mental fitness and general well-being. Art is a process of exploration, externalized. Human beings are inherently artistic. Therefore, any human activity can be expressed artfully. Our goal is, simply put: to become aware of this phenomenon and learn to practice it in all aspects of our lives.

Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: UH 200
Fine Arts, University Honors
UH
229
UH
Hours
1-6
Honors Special Topics

Special Topics.

Prerequisite(s): UH 200
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: UH 200
University Honors
UH
230
UH
Hours
3
UA Honors in New Zealand

Students will examine contemporary New Zealand neighborhoods and communities by purposefully employing ‘engaged’ and interactive discussions and conversations with (some of the) New Zealanders they encounter each day from a wide range of demographics, i.e. an ethnographic/communications approach. Students will rely on an instructor-generated list of talking points as a general guide. Classes will assemble most, but not all, days in New Zealand to debrief and discuss the day’s conversations with the goal of (a) progressively getting a better understanding (than tourists) of New Zealand community life and (b) progressively getting better at asking people from another culture valuable (instead of predictable) questions and assessing, and following up on, answers. Students will also interact with New Zealand students and academic faculty to help build their understanding of neighborhoods and communities.

Prerequisite(s): UH 200
University Honors
UH
231
UH
Hours
3
UA in Germany Honors

The UA in Germany 2020 Honors program is designed to provide students with the opportunity to examine the many facets of recent history and of the contemporary situation of German society and engage in meaningful, reflective dialogue with international faculty and students through their experiences while visiting academic, cultural, business and industrial institutions in Karlsruhe, Strasbourg (F), Cologne, Hamburg, Berlin, Munich, and Stuttgart.

Prerequisite(s): UH 100
University Honors
UH
240
HU, UH
Hours
3
Origins of Western Thought: Epic Origins

In this course, students study and discuss the foundations of Western thought through study of ancient and classical epic poetry (in English translation). Works studied may include The Iliad, The Odyssey, The Theogony, The Aeneid, The Metamorphoses, and On the Nature of Things.

Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: UH 200
Humanities, University Honors
UH
241
HU, UH
Hours
3
Origins of Western Thought: Athens

This course, students study and discuss the foundations of Western thought through study of the history, philosophy, and drama (all in English translation) of classical Athens. Authors studied may include Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle, and Thucydides.

Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: UH 200
Humanities, University Honors
UH
242
HU, UH
Hours
3
Shakespeare: Love, Sex, Marriage, and Family

This course will study and discuss eight plays by Shakespeare, accompanied by secondary readings from multiple disciplines (sociology, anthropology, psychology, and philosophy). Readings and discussions will focus on the ethics of courtship, gender and sexuality, marriage, and parenting.

Prerequisite(s): UH 200
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: UH 200
Humanities, University Honors
UH
250
UH
Hours
3
A Republic If You Can Keep It

Divisiveness, alienation and polarization grip our country and our condition does not appear to be improving. There are many who believe that our form of self-governance is at risk from a variety of forces and factors. After the constitutional convention of 1787, Benjamin Franklin was asked what form of government had been established. His response was “A Republic If You Can Keep It” and his response is both the title and focus of this course.

Prerequisite(s): UH 200
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: UH 200
University Honors
UH
260
UH
Hours
3
Build Your Position! – Ethical Case Studies Made Practical

This course is about empowering students to develop an opinion about highly controversial topics in current public discussion. The participants will be encouraged to find and create building blocks based on conceptions of philosophical and theological ethics. In addition to introductory lectures, book discussions, films, and other media, role playing and mock debates will be used as tools to help sharpen argumentation. Possible topics include: “Blue or Red: Why and What Kind of Democracy Do You Want?,” “Labor Unions: Engines or Brakes to Societal Progress?,” "Immigration: Opportunity or Threat?,” “Abortion: Murder or Human Right?,” and “Confederate Flag: Heritage or Hate?.

Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: UH 200
University Honors
UH
270
UH
Hours
1
Engage Tuscaloosa

This is a service learning field experience course conducted by the Honors College Engage Tuscaloosa office. The service learning experience is a learning vehicle for the Honors students to be exposed to and learn about educational issues within multiple segments of our surrounding communities. UA students will work with pupils in local elementary, middle or high schools for 8-12 hours during the semester in a variety of educational settings and subject areas. Honors students will receive training during class time on the specific work to be done in the service learning experience, on how to work with school-aged children and how to be an effective mentor.

Prerequisite(s): UH 205
University Honors
UH
280
UH
Hours
3
Mosaic Advanced: An Experimental Multimedia Project

Class is for those students who have completed UH 180, and who return to take positions of leadership, sometimes as editors, working with groups of new students in that class to assist with writing, photography, graphic design, online and website work and social media. Students will be expected to develop original stories or projects that are more sophisticated and complex than their UH 180 work. Students will work with the aid of student editors and UA staff/faculty advisers.

Prerequisite(s): UH 180 and UH 200
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: UH 180 and UH 200
University Honors
UH
281
HU, UH
Hours
3
Writers and Revolutions

How do writers, and journalists-as-writers, see revolutions (some well known, some not so much) and what role do they play in them? We examine writers (some well known, some not so much), their lives, their texts their words, rhetoric and arguments, address their effects on revolutionary and/or cultural change, and we set these writers and their works within their broader economic, social, cultural, and political contexts. Are they archivists or activists? Do they help trigger and/or sustain revolutions, or help us understand them, or both? And what have they left us to help us understand modern political and cultural pressures that hint at radicalism or revolution?.

Prerequisite(s): UH 200
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: UH 200
Humanities, University Honors
UH
282
HU, UH
Hours
3
Imagining Revolution

This course surveys various examples of the revolutionary and radical imagination. Instead, of comparing different historical revolutions, this course will be exploring the different ways that people have imagined, in a revolutionary sense, alternative worlds. What does restless discontent with what-is look like in literature and art? In philosophy? In politics? In religion? In race and gender? By tracing the contours of such thoughts, we can begin, first, to see the power of critique and ask ourselves questions such as: Critique what? Critique why? Critique how? And secondly, we can begin to see the power of the speculative imagination and its role in creating a more desirable, and just, world.

Prerequisite(s): UH 200
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: UH 200
Humanities, University Honors
UH
295
UH
Hours
2
The Theory and Practice of Mentoring

Students will explore scholarship about peer mentoring in the college setting, developing an understanding of the practice of mentoring and the purpose of their role as mentors within the Honors College. The course will provide the theoretical framework for the interrogation and implementation of mentoring and expose students to the various mentoring options in the Honors College. Students will also develop the skills necessary for facilitating group discussion.

Prerequisite(s): UH 100
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: UH 200 concurrent enrollment
University Honors
UH
300
UH, W
Hours
3
Honors Spec Topics Sem

These courses provide an opportunity for Honors College students to engage in discussion and exploration of various topics that change each semester. Satisfies W core curriculum designation. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

University Honors, Writing
UH
329
UH
Hours
1-6
Honors Special Topics

Special Topics.

Prerequisite(s): UH 200
University Honors
UH
330
UH
Hours
3
Intro Clinical Medicine

This course is designed to acquaint students with the major patterns of illness in the U.S. and with the medical disciplines that treat those diseases. 10 seats available.

University Honors
UH
331
HU, UH
Hours
1-3
Save First: Poverty in America

This course introduces students to the concepts of justice and obligation in various faith traditions, fosters discussion on issues faced by the working poor, perceptions and misperceptions of those living in poverty, and current policies affecting lower-income families and individuals. In addition to classroom discussions, students complete tax training and serve as SaveFirst volunteer tax preparers. Students also participate in the FocusFirst Initiative, which trains students to conduct high-tech vision screenings for children in economically disadvantaged communities. Offered in partnership with the Center for Ethics and Social Responsibility. Satisfies HU core curriculum designation.

Humanities, University Honors
UH
333
UH
Hours
1-3
Evry Move Cnts ChessED Project

This unique service-learning course facilitates learning about educational disparities, examines progressive education reform efforts across the country and investigates the proven academic, social and behavioral benefits children gain by learning chess. Offered in partnership with the Center for Ethics and Social Responsibility.

University Honors
UH
334
HU, UH
Hours
3
Documenting Justice I

This course explores ethnographic documentary filmmaking and critical journalism and helps students learn both technical (e.g., production and editing) and journalistic skills. Offered in partnership with the Center for Ethics and Social Responsibility. Satisfies HU core curriculum designation.

Humanities, University Honors
UH
335
HU, UH
Hours
3
Documenting Justice II

This course explores ethnographic documentary filmmaking and critical journalism and helps students learn both technical (e.g., production and editing) and journalistic skills. Offered in partnership with the Center for Ethics and Social Responsibility. Satisfies HU core curriculum designation.

Humanities, University Honors
UH
340
UH, W
Hours
3
Origins of Western Thought: The Judeo-Christian Tradition

This courses focuses on the history, literature, iconography, and sacred practices of the Judeo-Christian tradition. Texts under study may vary at instructor’s discretion, but will generally include readings from the Hebrew and Christian scriptures, Augustine’s Confessions, Dante’s Commedia, Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, and Milton’s Paradise Lost. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Prerequisite(s): UH 200; plus 3 more hours of 200 level UH coursework
University Honors, Writing
UH
341
UH, W
Hours
3
Origins of Western Thought—Modern Thought

This course focuses on developments in Western thinking from the Renaissance to the present day. Authors to be studied will invariably change at the instructor’s discretion, but students should expect to read and become familiar with the works of Shakespeare, Descartes, Pascal, Swift, Hume, Austen, Darwin, Freud, and Woolf. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Prerequisite(s): UH 200; plus 3 more hours of UH 200 level coursework
University Honors, Writing
UH
342
UH, W
Hours
3
Shakespearean History

This course examines the philosophy of history in seven plays by Shakespeare and numerous theoretical and critical readings, which may include Herodotus, Plato, Holinshed, Hume, and Hegel. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Prerequisite(s): UH 200; plus 3 more hours of 200 level UH coursework
University Honors, Writing
UH
346
UH, W
Hours
3
Existentialism, Race, and Gender

In this course, we will survey not only some of the canonical authors of existential philosophy (e.g., Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre), but more importantly, read them in relation to other authors that are not traditionally included, yet who struggle with the problems of existence and, in turn, provide wonderfully rich insights into the human condition. By breaking the boundaries of race and gender, as they are traditionally drawn by existential philosophy, and by including writers such as Ralph Ellison, Frantz Fanon, and Toni Morrison, a richer conversation on the nature of the human condition, as well as the possibilities for “being”, will be presented. The course’s primary objective is to read existential philosophy across race and gender. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Prerequisite(s): UH 200
University Honors, Writing
UH
347
UH, W
Hours
3
Political Theories of Love

What is a political theory of love? What does a politics of love look like? What is it a love of? Country? Justice? Fellow citizens? Should the concept of love serve as a starting point for thinking politically? Or should it, above all other things, be avoided as a starting point for thinking politically? These are just some of the questions that the tradition of political theory, stretching back to Plato’s Republic, has sought to answer in many different ways. In this course, we will explore such questions and some of the ways that they have been approached by various writers. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Prerequisite(s): UH 200; plus 3 more hours of UH 200 level coursework
University Honors, Writing
UH
348
UH, W
Hours
3
Green Political Thought

In this course, we will explore the intersections between political theory and environmentalism. When these two fields are brought together, there are interesting questions to be asked about humanity’s historically sovereign relation to, and role in, nature: What is the nature of freedom amidst so many environmental crises? How do we alter our value systems to better reflect environmentally sustainable behaviors? Do we pursue revolution or reform? In this course, we will survey the spectrum of Green political theories, including eco-liberalism, eco-socialism, eco-anarchism, eco-feminism, eco-terrorism, etc., and explore the myriad ways people have rethought our present and future politics in relation to our environments. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Prerequisite(s): UH 200
University Honors, Writing
UH
349
UH, W
Hours
3
The Neighbor

“Love your neighbor as yourself.” Why? Do they deserve it? And who is my neighbor? When Christ was asked, “Who is my neighbor?” a line of questioning was begun that has since populated the writings of authors such as Augustine, Friedrich Nietzsche, Soren Kierkegaard, Fyodor Dostoevsky, and Sigmund Freud to contemporary thinkers such as Cornel West and Slavoj Zizek. It is an ethic that has been both celebrated and critiqued. In either form, we will see that the category of “the neighbor” provides a productive starting point to begin thinking politically, economically, psychologically, and theologically. In this class, we will examine classic texts that engage the concept of love of the neighbor in order to trace its historical development as a social and political concept. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Prerequisite(s): UH 200
University Honors, Writing
UH
351
UH, W
Hours
3
Radical Stitches: Forming Identity through the Creation of Texts

This course will focus on women’s texts and explore how women form notions of identity and community through the production of various texts, including quilts, gardens, cookbooks, and diaries. We will question the gendering of particular crafts and how this affects our cultural knowledge and reading of these texts. Major projects for this course will include a biographical/historical sketch, an oral history project, and a final written project. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Prerequisite(s): UH 200
University Honors, Writing
UH
352
UH, W
Hours
3
Southern Women Writers

In this course, we will examine the texts and traditions of women writers from the American South. Through close reading and writing, we will analyze the use of autobiography in these texts, exploring how writing as a southerner and as a woman shapes one’s work and achievement. We will read works by some of the most distinguished writers of the last two centuries–including Zora Neale Hurston, Eudora Welty, Alice Walker, and Ellen Douglas, as well as lesser known writers. As we read and write, we will also discuss our own experiences of the South, its people, and its narratives and how we choose to interact with them. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Prerequisite(s): UH 200
University Honors, Writing
UH
353
UH, W
Hours
3
American Dream(s): Exploring Narratives of American Life

This course will explore the literary and historical development of American Dream(s) through narratives in American Literature. We will engage with narratives throughout American history focusing on the narrative's power to define and develop social norms but also enact social change. We will develop a vocabulary for discussing the relationships between narratives and social change and analyze written and oral narratives and the cultural and historical contexts that surround them. We will concentrate specifically on narratives of marginalized people in American Literature. We will examine how narratives are used to create connections, educate, inform, and inspire readers/listeners/viewers. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Prerequisite(s): UH 200
University Honors, Writing
UH
360
UH
Hours
3
Heroes of Faith and Justice in the 20th Century

This course introduces three distinguished symbolic figures for the commitment to faith, peace, and justice: Gandhi, Bonhoeffer, and Martin Luther King, Jr. Building on the studies on life, achievements, and doctrines of the three selected historical persons, we will look at contemporary conflicts and reflect about what we may be able to take away from the historical conflicts for their solutions.

Prerequisite(s): UH 200; and completion of an additional 3 credit hours of UH coursework at the 200 level
University Honors
UH
361
UH
Hours
3
One Nation Under God

How did the United States, founded as colonies with profoundly religious aspirations, come to be the first modern state whose commitment to the separation of church and state was reflected in its constitution? From the election of 1800, when Federalist clergymen considered Deist Thomas Jefferson unfit to lead a “Christian nation,” to today, when religion again plays an unmistakable role in political identity, it has been a crucial and constant element in American politics. This seminar is meant to reconstruct the complicated connections of religion and politics in American history in order to enable the participants to develop a well reflected and solid position in this embattled field.

Prerequisite(s): UH 200; plus 3 more hours of UH coursework at the 200 level
University Honors
UH
370
UH
Hours
1
Engage Tuscaloosa

This is a service learning field experience course conducted by the Honors College Engage Tuscaloosa office and is a follow up to the UH 270 field experience for students who are interested in a more in-depth experience. This service learning opportunity is meant to enhance the prior learning experience of the Honors students by challenging them to look deeply at not only educational issues, but social issues within multiple segments of our surrounding communities and state. UA students will continue to work with pupils in local elementary, middle or high schools for 10-12 hours during the semester in a variety of educational settings and subject areas. Honors students will receive additional training during class time on the specific work to be done in the service learning experience, on how to work with school-aged children and how to be an effective mentor.

Prerequisite(s): UH 270
University Honors
UH
380
UH
Hours
3
Mosaic Leadership: An Experimental Multimedia Project

This course is a continuation of Mosaic class UH 280. Students return to take positions as highest level of leadership (e.g. Editor-in-Chief, Executive Editor, Managing Editor). Students will make editorial and management decisions (e.g. theme of Mosaic work for the semester, subjects to address, deadlines, assignments, choice of editors, editing decisions, what to run and what not to run, editing instructions, Style, work priorities, work loads, publications times and dates, and approve content, designs and layouts. Students will work with the aid of student editors and UA staff/faculty advisers.

Prerequisite(s): UH 280
University Honors
UH
381
UH, W
Hours
3
Gossip and Rumor: Featuring Social Change and Social Media

Society is saturated in gossip and rumor, essential, powerful and subversive forms of human communication, yet their role is commonly overlook, dismiss or trivialize in society. This class examines their history, morality, psychology, vital agency in social change, commercialization and ethics, the mass media’s amplification of them and their role in close circles, workplaces and organizations. Their future given the immense impact of social media on interpersonal communication is also examined. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Prerequisite(s): UH 200; and an additional 3 credit hours of 200 level honors coursework
University Honors, Writing
UH
382
UH, W
Hours
3
Thomas Paine and Revolutionary Writing

English radical Thomas Paine (1737-1809), writer and thinker but more writer than thinker, is author of the most influential and distinctly “American” revolutionary ideals and roadmaps, best selling author of the 18th century, a significant factor in both the American and French Revolutions and pioneer of modern democracy. We look at his life, character, times, influences, ideas, works and legacy and we compare him to other revolutionary writers. Writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper-division student will not earn a passing grade, no matter how well the student performs in other areas of the course.

Prerequisite(s): UH 200; plus 3 more hours of 200 level UH coursework
University Honors, Writing
UH
395
UH
Hours
1
HYO Mentors

The Honors Year One program allows Honors College students the opportunity to serve as peer mentors for incoming Honors College freshmen. Mentors will co-lead small group discussion and assist freshmen students in developing an awareness of the Honors College, the university, and the greater community. During preparation classes mentors will continue to develop leadership, teamwork, and inclusivity skills, discuss mentoring and their role in HYO, and illustrate respect and empathy. During small group discussions, mentors will put to practice what they have learned to help freshmen students learn and practice the key concepts of engaged scholarship, including critical and creative thinking, ethical and empathetic dialogue, and collaborative and inclusive leadership.

Prerequisite(s): UH 100, UH 200, and UH 295
University Honors
UH
396
UH
Hours
1
Honors Action Mentors

In this six day, field experience course, students will serve as peer mentors for the Honors Action Program. They will help immerse freshmen students in the foundations of the Honors College and community engagement. Peer mentors will take part in service learning project creation and planning before the week-long program in coordination HYO faculty and staff and Honors Action Student Leadership Team. The week of the program, peer mentors will implement these projects with the freshmen, attend the lectures, and serve as small group discussion leaders. All mentors are expected to have read the Common Book before the program week.

Prerequisite(s): UH 100, UH 200, and UH 295
University Honors
UH
400
UH
Hours
1-6
Honors Independent Study

Students work on an independent project with a faculty supervisor.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of a minimum of 3 hours of UH subject labeled coursework at the 100, 200 or 300 level
University Honors
UH
405
UH
Hours
1-6
Leadership Experience

Leadership Experience integrates diverse practical experiences with leadership concepts so that students can serve as informed, proactive leaders in various Honors College initiatives. The course utilizes a combination of small group discussions on leadership theory with opportunities for Honors College students to demonstrate their personal leadership styles.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of a minimum of 2 hours of UH subject labeled coursework at the 100, 200 or 300 level
University Honors
UH
425
UH
Hours
4
Graduate School Preparation

This course is designed to provide a capstone to the Honors College curriculum specifically through preparing students for graduate school in the liberal arts fields, rather than professional school. Students will be exposed to important concepts associated with graduate school preparation and provided opportunities to cultivate their own professional development and discipline knowledge. Further, students will be expected to develop professional relationships with faculty members within their field and to construct a graduate research agenda. Prerequisite of at least 3 credits of UH 100-300 level hours required.

Prerequisite(s): Minimum 3 credits in UH 100, UH 200 or UH 300 level courses.
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: No
University Honors
UH
498
UH
Hours
1-3
Honors Thesis Research

Research on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with a qualified faculty supervisor pertaining to an honors thesis. A proposal outlining the thesis project must be approved prior to registration.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of a minimum of 3 hours of UH subject labeled coursework at the 100, 200 or 300 level
University Honors
UH
499
UH
Hours
3
Honors Thesis

Research on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with a qualified faculty supervisor culminating in an honors thesis. A proposal outlining the thesis project must be approved prior to registration.

Prerequisite(s): Completion of a minimum of 3 hours of UH subject labeled coursework at the 100, 200 or 300 level
University Honors