Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering (MTE)

The department offers programs leading to the master of science in metallurgical engineering degree and to the doctor of philosophy degree in the area of materials/metallurgical engineering.

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Programs

An interdisciplinary PhD degree in materials science is also offered (see Interdisciplinary Programs). The graduate program in metallurgical and materials engineering allows for close association between graduate students and the faculty.

Research

Research interests of the department include thermodynamics and kinetics of molten metal processes, chemical metallurgy, metal-casting, corrosion phenomena, computer modeling of solidification and other metallurgical processes, electrodynamics of molten metals, metal matrix composites, thin-film technology, tribology, magnetic materials, microgravity effects in solidification, modeling microstructural evolution, and micromechanical behavior in cast materials, fracture mechanics, refractories, molten salts, electronic materials, thin films, and fuel cells, and phase equilibria. Facilities are available for directional and high-speed solidification, levitation melting, sputtering and chemical vapor-deposition, optical and electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, corrosion, nanoindentation, and electrochemistry, materials characterization facilities, MEMS and thermal properties, and thermodynamic properties. A metal-casting facility is equipped with up-to-date metal melting and casting equipment and is one of the finest facilities in the United States for teaching, research, and service to the metal-casting and processing industry. Well-qualified machinists are available for construction of highly specialized research equipment.
 
Computational facilities are comprehensive, ranging from workstations, minicomputers, and PC units with associated data-acquisition peripherals to access the campus mainframe equipment.

Faculty

Head
  • Mark Weaver
Professor
  • Mark Weaver

Courses

MTE
519
Hours
3
Solidificatn Science

Overview of the principles of solidification processing, the evolution of solidification microstructure, segregation, defects and the use of analytical and computational tools for the design, understanding and use of solidification processes.

MTE
539
Hours
3
Metallurgy Of Welding

Thermal, chemical, and mechanical aspects of welding using the fusion welding process. The metallurgical aspects of welding, including microstructure and properties of the weld, are also covered. Various topics on recent trends in welding research.

Prerequisite(s): MTE 380
MTE
546
Hours
3
Macroscp Transp Mat Proc

Elements of laminar and turbulent flow; heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation; and mass transfer in laminar and in turbulent flow; mathematical modeling of transport phenomena in metallurgical systems including melting and refining processes, solidification processes, packed bed systems, and fluidized bed systems.

Prerequisite(s): MATH 238 and MTE 353
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: MTE 271
MTE
550
Hours
3
Sputtered Thin Flim Basics Ap

This course will cover fundamental technology involved in thin film processing. Plasma deposition and etch technology will be discussed. The basics of plasma processing equipment will be detailed, with special emphasis on sputtering tools. A range of thin film applications will be explored, with examples of magnetics, semiconductor, optical, and medical applications. The fundamentals of process optimization using a Design of Experiments will be taught with a test case of process optimization for the final exam.

Prerequisite(s): With permission of instructor.
MTE
556
Hours
3
Advanced Mechanical Behavior

Topics include elementary elasticity, plasticity, and dislocation theory; strengthening by dislocation substructure, and solid solution strengthening; precipitation and dispersion strengthening; fiber reinforcement; martensitic strengthening; grain-size strengthening; order hardening; dual phase microstructures, etc.

Prerequisite(s): MTE 455
MTE
562
Hours
3
Metallurgicl Thermodyn

Laws of thermodynamics, equilibria, chemical potentials and equilibria in heterogeneous systems, activity functions, chemical reactions, phase diagrams, and electrochemical equilibria; thermodynamic models and computations; and application to metallurgical processes.

Prerequisite(s): MTE 362
MTE
567
Hours
3
Strengthening Mechanisms in Materials

Mechanisms and micromechanics of strengthening in engineering materials. This course covers the physical phenomena that contribute towards high mechanical strength in engineering materials. Principles for designing high strength materials will be addressed.

Prerequisite(s): MTE 455 or equivalent: or permission of instructor
MTE
579
Hours
3
Advanced Physical Metallurgy

Graduate-level treatments of the fundamentals of symmetry, crystallography, crystal structures, defects in crystals (including dislocation theory), and atomic diffusion.

MTE
583
Hours
3
Adv Structure Of Metal

Graduate-level treatments of symmetry, crystallography, crystal structures and defects in crystals. Application of analytical techniques to study crystal structures and textures in materials.

MTE
585
Hours
3
Materls At Elevd Temps

Influence of temperatures on behavior and properties of materials.

MTE
587
Hours
3
Corrosion Science & Engr

Fundamental causes of corrosion problems and failures. Emphasis is placed on tools and knowledge necessary for predicting corrosion, measuring corrosion rates, and combining this with prevention and materials selection.

Prerequisite(s): MTE 271 and CH 102 or CH 118
MTE
591
Hours
1-4
Special Problems

Advanced work of an investigative nature. Credit awarded is based on the work accomplished.

MTE
592
Hours
1-3
Special Problems

Advanced work of an investigative nature. Credit awarded is based on the work accomplished.

MTE
595
Hours
1
Seminar Senior Thesis

Discussion of current advances and research in metallurgical engineering; presented by graduate students and the staff.

MTE
596
Hours
1
Seminar

Discussion of current advances and research in metallurgical engineering; presented by graduate students and the staff.

MTE
599
Hours
1-12
Thesis Research

No description available.

MTE
643
Hours
3
Magnetic Materials and Magnetic Recording

This course provides knowledge on basic magnetism and magnetic materials of various types, and also introduces the applications. Origin of magnetism, ferro-magnetism, anti-ferro-magnetism, ferrimagnetism, hard- and soft-magnetic materials, spintronics, magnetic recording, magnetic random access memory (MRAM), spin-transfer-torque MRAM, spin transistor and Optical recording.

Prerequisite(s): MTE 271 and permission of instructor.
MTE
655
Hours
4
Electron Microscopy Matl

Topics include basic principles of operation of the transmission electron microscope, principles of electron diffraction, image interpretation, and various analytical electron-microscopy techniques as they apply to crystalline materials.

MTE
670
Hours
3
Scanning Electron Microscopy

Theory, construction, and operation of the scanning electron microscope. Both imaging and x-ray spectroscopy are covered. Emphasis is placed on application and uses in metallurgical engineering and materials-related fields.

MTE
680
Hours
3
Advanced Phase Diagrams

Advanced phase studies of binary, ternary, and more complex systems; experimental methods of construction and interpretation.

MTE
684
Hours
3
Fund Solid State Engineering

Fundamentals of solid state physics and quantum mechanics are covered to explain the physical principles underlying the design and operation of semiconductor devices. The second part covers applications to semiconductor microdevices and nanodevices such as diodes, transistors, lasers, and photodetectors incorporating quantum structures.

Prerequisite(s): MTE 271 or ECE 332
MTE
687
Hours
3
Microstructure Evolution of Materials

The course will cover the fundamentals and state-of-the-art techniques used in mathematical modeling and computer simulation of microstructure formation and control during the solidification and solid state transformations of materials. The concepts and methodologies covered in this course for net-shape casting and ingot remelt processes can be applied, with some modifications, to model other materials processes such as welding, deposition, and heat treatment processes. Modeling and simulation of microstructure evolution requires complex multi-scale computational areas, from computational fluid dynamics macroscopic modeling through mesoscopic to microscopic modeling, as well as strategies to link various length-scales emerged in modeling of microstructural evolution.

MTE
691
Hours
1-3
Special Problems

Credit awarded is based on the amount of work undertaken.

MTE
695
Hours
1
Seminar

Presentations on dissertation-related research or on items of current interest in materials and metallurgical engineering.

MTE
696
Hours
1
Seminar

Presentations on dissertation-related research or on items of current interest in materials and metallurgical engineering.

MTE
699
Hours
1-12
Dissertation Research

No description available.