Department of Chemistry (CH)

The Department of Chemistry offers programs in the five traditional areas of chemistry (analytical, biochemistry, inorganic, organic, and physical) leading to the master of science in chemistry (Plan I or Plan II,) as outlined in the Academic Policies section of this catalog) and the doctor of philosophy in chemistry. The completion of a master's degree is optional for students enrolled in the PhD program.

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Programs

Financial Assistance

Financial assistance for graduate students in chemistry is available through fellowships, graduate teaching assistantships, and graduate research assistantships.

Faculty

Chair
  • Kevin Shaughnessy
Graduate Director
  • Stephen Woski
Professors
  • Kevin Shaughnessy
  • Stephen Woski

Courses

CH
501
Hours
3
Intro Grad Inorg Chem

Generally, this course is for entering graduate students whose undergraduate training in inorganic chemistry is insufficient.

CH
505
Hours
3
Medicinal Chemistry

Deatailed investigation of the drug design process. Includes lead discovery, target identification and validation, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and drug delivery systems. Chemical modification to improve efficacy will be emphasized.

CH
510
Hours
3
Scientific Glassblowing

No description available.

CH
521
Hours
3
Intro Grad Analytical Chem

Generally, this course is for entering students whose undergraduate training in analytical chemistry is insufficient.

CH
524
Hours
3
Adv Anl Ch I Spec Meth

Provides graduate students with knowledge of the fundamental aspects of various modern methods of spectroscopic analysis. Reference to analytical applications and experimental methods is made, where relevant.

CH
526
Hours
3
Chemometrics

Chemometrics involves the application of statistical and mathematical methods to chemistry. Areas of emphasis will be data and error analysis, calibration, experimental design, signal processing and transform procedures, and data description and enhancement.

CH
530
Hours
3
Intro Grad Org Chem

Generally, this course is for entering graduate students whose undergraduate training in organic chemistry is insufficient.

CH
531
Hours
3
Adv Organ Chem I-Physicl

Theory and mechanism of organic transformations, detailed evaluation of organic structure, molecular dynamics, molecular orbital interactions, molecular symmetry, sterochemistry of reactions, and energetics of reaction paths.

CH
532
Hours
3
Adv Org Ch II React Synt

Fundamentals of organic transformations and advanced synthetic methodology with application to the synthesis of complex organic structures.

CH
540
Hours
3
Intro Grad Phy Chem

Generally, this course is for entering graduate students whose undergraduate training in physical chemistry is insufficient.

CH
541
Hours
3
Adv Physical Chem I

No description available.

CH
549
Hours
3
Adv Ph Ch II Atom/Mol

No description available.

CH
561
Hours
3
Biochemistry I

First-semester course in basic biochemistry. Structure and properties of biological molecules, including proteins, DNA, RNA, carbohydrates, lipids, and enzyme cofactors and prosthetic groups. Introduction to intermediary metabolism and glycolysis. Offered fall semester.

CH
562
Hours
3
Biochemistry II

Continuation of basic one-year course in biochemistry. Intermediary metabolism, TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and catabolism of biomolecules. Biosynthesis of amino acids, nucleotides, carbohydrates, and lipids. DNA and RNA replication, with introduction to recombinant technology. Protein biosynthesis and membrane transport. Offered spring semester.

CH
563
Hours
3
Biochemistry Lab

One lecture and one six-hour laboratory. Biochemical techniques within the structure of a semester-long research project. Topics include protein purification and chromatography, spectroscopy, electrophoresis, kinetics, and DNA manipulation.

CH
564
Hours
3
Adv Biophysical Chem

The study of physical techniques applied to the development and experimental verification of biochemical hypotheses. Examples include forms of spectroscopy, treatment of multiple equilibria, and enzyme kinetics. Examples of applications are drawn from such areas as oxygen transport, oxidative phosphorylation, and photosynthesis.

CH
565
Hours
3
Adv Bio-Inorganic Chem

Study of current knowledge on the roles of metal ions in biological systems, including structural and catalytic functions. Topics include bio-coordination chemistry, spectroscopic and magnetic methods, and kinetics.

CH
566
Hours
3
Bioorganic Reaction Mechanisms

This course will be divided into two main areas. We will begin with methods for studying enzyme reaction mechanisms. This section will include steady-state enzyme kinetics, derivation of rate equations, enzyme inhibition, isotope exchange methods, pH and viscosity effects, kinetic isotope effects, and site-directed mutagenesis. We will then utilize these methods in order to investigate the chemical mechanisms enzymes use to catalyze specific reactions (hydrolysis; group transfer; 1,1 hydrogen shift; 1,2 hydrogen shift; C-C bond formations; and redox chemistry). We will also cover the chemistry associated with several cofactors required by enzymes (flavins, thiamin pyrophosphate, tetrahydrofolate, etc).

CH
570
Hours
1-6
Research Techniques Chemistry

Independent study in chemistry to learn the tools of chemical research.

CH
584
Hours
3
Literature and Communication in Graduate Chemistry

This course is an introduction to researching chemistry literature. Topics covered will primarily be related to scientific critical analysis and effective scientific communication, both written and oral. Students will receive structured guidance from the class instructor (s), chemistry faculty, and their class peers throughout the semester to assist with writing a chemistry research paper and delivering an oral presentation. Successful completion of this course will fulfill the literature seminar requirements (written research paper and seminar) for chemistry graduate students.

CH
585
Hours
2
Chemistry Seminars

Course requires attendance at presentations given by graduate students and outside speakers.

CH
586
Hours
2
Chemistry Seminars

Presentation of seminar to department.

CH
599
Hours
1-6
Thesis Research

No description available.

CH
601
Hours
3
Adv Inor Chi:Strct Mth

No description available.

CH
605
Hours
3
Spec Topics Inorg Chem

No description available.

CH
609
Hours
3
Organometallic Chem

Structure, bonding, and reactivity of organotransition metallic compounds, mechanisms of transformations and fundamental reaction types, applications to catalysis and organic synthesis.

CH
621
Hours
3
Trends In Analytical Chem

No description available.

CH
626
Hours
3
Surface Analytical Techniques

Introduces the student to the instrumentation and techniques used to study surfaces and interfaces. Spectroscopic, microscopic, desorption, and vacuum techniques are covered.

CH
627
Hours
3
Mass Spectrometry

Deals with all areas of mass spectrometry (MS), including single and multiple stage MS and chromatography/MS. The emphasis is on fundamental principles and instrumentation, as well as applications and data interpretation.

CH
635
Hours
3
Sel Topics In Org Chem

No description available.

CH
637
Hours
3
Spectroscopic Techniqa

Fundamentals of spectroscopic techniques for structure determination of organic molecules. Theory and application of IR, NMR, and MS in organic chemistry.

CH
643
Hours
3
Quantum Mechanics

This course covers topics in molecular reaction dynamics. We will study how reactions occur in the gas-phase, at surfaces and in liquids. We will also study molecular photochemistry and describe modern experimental techniques.

Prerequisite(s): CH 342
CH
645
Hours
3
Physical Methods of Materials Chemistry

When one or more of the physical dimensions of an object approach reduce to the 1-100 nm range dramatic changes in the properties can occur. This has lead to the ideas of "Nanoscience" and "Nanotechnology." Some of the physical chemistry of these objects involves both new methods of measurement and new fundamental concepts. Examples of new experimental methods include, Atomic Force Microscopy, Atomic Scanning/Tunneling Microscopy, Near Field Imaging, and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering. Examples of new fundament concepts include plasmon resonance, coulomb blockade, and quantum confinement. The goal of this course will be to provide the student with the basic tools to read the scientific literature with understanding of the material and to provide the students with an overview of work in this area.

CH
660
Hours
1-6
Adv Research Techniques Chem

Independent study in chemistry to learn advanced research techniques used in all areas of chemical research.

CH
680
Hours
1
Initial Research Review

MS and PHD students present their initial research project progress to their thesis or dissertation committee respectively.

CH
681
Hours
1
Original Research Proposal

PHD students prepare an original research proposal to solve a current problem in chemical science and present and defend it in front of their dissertation committee.

CH
699
Hours
1-12
Dissertation Research

No description available.