Department of Art and Art History (ART and ARH)

The Department of Art and Art History offers programs leading to the master of arts (studio), the master of arts (art history), and the master of fine arts (studio). The major studio areas in the department are ceramics, painting, photography, printmaking, and sculpture. (The content of individual courses may be diverse and vary from traditional designations.) Concentrations within art history are offered in Renaissance, Baroque, 19th-century, 20th-century/Contemporary, and South/Southeast Asian and East Asian art.

Credits earned at accredited institutions may be transferred. Such transfers will be determined after completion at the University of at least 12 semester hours, or one term in residence, and upon review by the student's faculty committee. Graduate courses in both art history and art studio are normally taught only in the fall and spring semesters.

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Faculty

Chair
  • Thomas Wolfe
Professor
  • Thomas Wolfe

Courses

Art History Courses

ARH
501
Hours
3
Interdisciplinary Seminar

The primary goal of this course is to explore contemporary visual culture through theory, history, and studio practice.

ARH
502
Hours
3
Paul R. Jones Collection of American Art K-12 Program

This program is designed to offer graduate and undergraduate students the opportunity to conduct interdisciplinary community engagement activities via with the College of Arts and Sciences’s Paul R. Jones Collection of American Art (PRJCAA). Central to this course is student use of the PRJCAA to engage K-12 pupils and their teachers in the Tuscaloosa area. Students will learn about the PRJCAA including its content, mission, and goals. They will also begin investigating foundational readings in community engagement scholarship. To join this class, students must complete an application and interview process. This course does not meet at regularly scheduled class times during the day and much of course itself is conducted off-site at a school within the Tuscaloosa City School system. Students must undergo a mandatory (state required) background check before starting the program.

Prerequisite(s): By Instructor Permission Only
ARH
550
Hours
3
Literature Of Art

Principles and methodology of the discipline as described in the writing of its founders and chief makers; bibliographical research method and mastery. Required of all art history MA students.

ARH
555
Hours
3
Asian Seminar

No description available.

ARH
556
Hours
3
The Arts Of Buddhism

Students will learn the major artistic movements and styles inherent in the artistic products of India, China, Japan, Southeast Asia, Tibet and Nepal.

ARH
560
Hours
3
Medieval Seminar

This course considers a broad range of issues, objects, and themes relevant to the study of art and architecture in medieval Europe. Class sessions will be organized around readings selected to introduce existing scholarship and methods while stimulating new questions for future research.

ARH
565
Hours
3
Topics in Renaissance Art/Renaissance Seminar

This graduate-level seminar will explore a variety of critical themes and issues in the study of Early Modern/Renaissance art.

ARH
570
Hours
3
Baroque & Rococo Seminar

No description available.

ARH
575
Hours
3
Nineteenth Cent Seminar

No description available.

ARH
577
Hours
3
American Art Seminar

Graduate level seminar exploring a topic of historical American Art.

ARH
580
Hours
3
Twentieth Century Sem

No description available.

ARH
598
Hours
3
Independent Study

No description available.

ARH
599
Hours
1-12
Thesis Research

No description available.

Studio Art Courses

ART
501
Hours
3
Interdisciplinary Studio

The primary goal of this course is to explore contemporary visual culture through theory, history, and studio practice.

ART
502
Hours
3
Paul R. Jones Collection of American Art K-12 Program

Prerequisites: Twelve undergraduate hours in the specific studio field requested, review of portfolio, and permission of the department chairperson. This course is open only to graduate students who are not enrolled in a graduate program in the Department of Art.

ART
506
Hours
1-6
Independent Studies

Students may make proposals for projects not taught in the regular curriculum. These must be approved by a faculty sponsor and the chairperson of the department.

ART
508
Hours
3
Special Projects

Special projects course titles include Alternative Photographic Process, Photo-based Printmaking, Water Media on Paper, Figurative Modeling and Sculpture, Experimental Drawing and The Photographic Artist's Book.

ART
510
Hours
3
Advanced Drawing Seminar

The focus of this course will be the study and production of drawings as an activity that documents our memories, examines and explains the world around us, transforms our perceptions of time and space, and helps us invent new ways of seeing and thinking.

ART
511
Hours
3
Graduate Seminar

A critical examination of contemporary issues, philosophies, criteria, and ideas in art.

ART
512
Hours
2-6
Ceramics

The ceramics program has a fully equipped facility with a complete inventory of clay and glaze materials. Facilities include equipment for clay mixing and preparation; workstations for forming and throwing; gas, wood fire, raku, and electric kilns; and materials for experimental kiln construction. Personal instruction is given in all forming techniques, glaze calculations, and firings. Students are encouraged to experiment with the medium and explore new processes. Emphasis is placed on the student's development of concepts and forms.

ART
516
Hours
2-6
Painting

The primary goal of the painting program is to enhance the student's ability in conceiving of a strong personal vision. The program defines painting as a complex and vital art form that exists in a state of constant flux, a tradition that is both mired in history and capable of regularly redefining itself. It equally embraces students who define painting as a practice that goes far beyond the brush, and those who employ more traditional methodologies.

ART
518
Hours
2-6
Photography

Photography is viewed as a means of personal expression and exploration, emphasizing development of the student's vision. Instruction is individually tailored and, although the facilities are designed for black and white printing, the exploration of alternative applications is encouraged. Graduate students are expected to increase their knowledge of the history of photography and contemporary art, and participate in teaching undergraduates. Facilities include a film developing area, two darkrooms, and a critique space. Computers are accessed through the digital media area.

ART
520
Hours
2-6
Printmaking

Graduate printmaking is conducted in a workshop situation, including group critiques and technical demonstrations. The program philosophy embraces a broad spectrum of activities relating to the idea of the multiple and the history of printed material. Students are expected to master traditional techniques and encouraged to work in an interdisciplinary manner, exploring the boundaries of the media area. The facility comprises equipment for intaglio and relief printing, stone and plate lithography, screen printing, and photo-based/digital printmaking.

ART
522
Hours
3-6
Sculpture

The sculpture program allows students to work with an extensive range of media and processes while emphasizing conceptual development and refined technical ability. Sculpture encompasses traditional media, methods, and processes as well as technologies that can be adapted to sculptural activities, idioms, and forms. Facilities include a full wood shop, metal fabrication shop, foundry, critique/installation room, and graduate studio space.

ART
525
Hours
3
Graduate Critiques

This course examines the studio practice through critical discourse, defending and discussing aesthetic philosophy and its application to research in the visual arts.

ART
528
Hours
3
Advanced Digital Photography (Graduate Level)

The course will expand upon digital skills for the photographer / digital artist presented in ART 328. This course presents technical, aesthetic and conceptual concerns at an advanced level. Content will be delivered through lecture, demonstrations, workshops, and experiential learning. The primary emphasis is on student-driven production of fully realized artworks. There will be regular critiques to facilitate the creative process. There will be a survey of contemporary photo / digital artists to stimulate ideas, discussion and practices across numerous conceptual themes. The semester will culminate in the production of a final portfolio and works presented for exhibition.,,Graduate students will be expected to create artworks at a higher level of sophistication. Further, they will be required to deliver content presentations to the class at level equivalent to course instruction. Finally, they will be expected to meet with professor regularly for in-depth discussions of course content and artistic production.

Prerequisite(s): ART 328
ART
530
Hours
3
Problems and Techniques for Teaching Studio Foundations

Graduate students will acquire expertise with teaching concepts and techniques relative to studio foundations teaching.

Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in Art or Art History
ART
612
Hours
2-6
Ceramics

The ceramics program has a fully equipped facility with a complete inventory of clay and glaze materials. Facilities include equipment for clay mixing and preparation; workstations for forming and throwing; gas, wood fire, raku, and electric kilns; and materials for experimental kiln construction. Personal instruction is given in all forming techniques, glaze calculations, and firings. Students are encouraged to experiment with the medium and explore new processes. Emphasis is placed on the student's development of concepts and forms.

ART
616
Hours
2-6
Painting

The primary goal of the painting program is to enhance the student's ability in conceiving of a strong personal vision. The program defines painting as a complex and vital art form that exists in a state of constant flux, a tradition that is both mired in history and capable of regularly redefining itself. It equally embraces students who define painting as a practice that goes far beyond the brush, and those who employ more traditional methodologies.

ART
618
Hours
2-6
Photography

Photography is viewed as a means of personal expression and exploration, emphasizing development of the student's vision. Instruction is individually tailored and, although the facilities are designed for black and white printing, the exploration of alternative applications is encouraged. Graduate students are expected to increase their knowledge of the history of photography and contemporary art, and participate in teaching undergraduates. Facilities include a film developing area, two darkrooms, and a critique space. Computers are accessed through the digital media area.

ART
620
Hours
2-6
Printmaking

Graduate printmaking is conducted in a workshop situation, including group critiques and technical demonstrations. The program philosophy embraces a broad spectrum of activities relating to the idea of the multiple and the history of printed material. Students are expected to master traditional techniques and encouraged to work in an interdisciplinary manner, exploring the boundaries of the media area. The facility comprises equipment for intaglio and relief printing, stone and plate lithography, screen printing, and photo-based/digital printmaking.

ART
622
Hours
3-6
Sculpture

The sculpture program allows students to work with an extensive range of media and processes while emphasizing conceptual development and refined technical ability. Sculpture encompasses traditional media, methods, and processes as well as technologies that can be adapted to sculptural activities, idioms, and forms. Facilities include a full wood shop, metal fabrication shop, foundry, critique/installation room, and graduate studio space.

ART
625
Hours
3
Graduate Critiques

This course examines the studio practice through critical discourse, defending and discussing aesthetic philosophy and its application to research in the visual arts.