Department of Anthropology (ANT)

The Department of Anthropology of The University of Alabama offers programs leading to the Master of Arts degree and the Doctor of Philosophy degree. These programs seek to furnish a balanced view of anthropological inquiry by means of intensive training in the literature, theory, methods, techniques, and skills required for research in anthropology. The MA builds on the inherent strengths of medium-sized departments—the ability to provide necessary background through small seminar courses and specialized training through the tutorial format of individually directed research projects. In short, the MA program provides students with a scholarly comprehension of the discipline, practical experiences in anthropological research situations, and the initial competency required of a professional anthropologist. The PhD program provides students with advanced training in one of two departmental focus areas: Biocultural Medical Anthropology or Archaeology of Complex Societies of the Americas. See specific details at the website of the Department of Anthropology.

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Faculty

Chair
  • Ian Brown
Graduate Program Director
  • Jason DeCaro
Professors
  • Elliot Blair
  • John Blitz
  • Ian Brown
  • Jason DeCaro
  • William Dressler
  • Marysia Galbraith
  • Keith Jacobi
  • Lisa LeCount
  • Christopher Lynn
  • David Meek
  • Kathryn Oths
  • Sonya Pritzker
  • Alexandre Tokovinine
  • Lesley Jo Weaver

Courses

Prerequisites: Twelve hours in anthropology and graduate standing, or permission of the instructor.

ANT
501
Hours
3
Anthropol Linguistics

The scientific study of natural language; phonology and grammar, lexicon, and meaning; and the role of linguistics in anthropological research. Offered once a year.

ANT
502
Hours
3
Gender Ethnicity & Health

No description available.

ANT
505
Hours
3
Culture, Mind, and Behavior

The cultural and linguistic basis of cognitive organization, local systems of folk classification, and the collection and analysis of data of shared cultural and social information. Offered according to demand.

ANT
508
Hours
3
Ancient Mexican Civilization

A survey of the origin and development of Mesoamerican civilizations. Offered according to demand.

ANT
509
Hours
3
Ancient Maya Civilizatns

Ancient Maya civilizations in Mexico and Central America from the earliest inhabitants until the Spanish Conquest.

ANT
510
Hours
3
Ethnography of Communication

Students in this course will learn to use the concepts and methods of ethnography of communication by developing and carrying out a research project on language and social interaction. You will learn how social interaction is organized, how to document and study it, and how to address such evidence to to anthropological and applied problems. Graduate students will produce a research report worthy of submission to a research conference of their professional scholarly organization. All students will finish the course with a critical and sophisticated understanding of how social interaction works in a variety of contexts.

ANT
511
Hours
3
Culture Health & Healing

Provides the student with an overview of health, illness, and healing as they vary between and within cultural systems.

ANT
512
Hours
3
Peoples Of Europe

A survey of the standards, customs, and beliefs that typify European cultures. Offered according to demand.

ANT
513
Hours
3
Peoples Of Latin Amer

A survey of the standards, customs, and beliefs that typify Latin American cultures. Offered according to demand.

ANT
518
Hours
3
Dev Non-West Cultures

A theoretical and descriptive study of social change and development in non-Western societies. Major emphasis will be on the effect of change on indigenous institutions. Offered according to demand.

ANT
519
Hours
3
Myth Ritual And Magic

A survey of the anthropological literature on religion, including such topics as myth, ritual, magic, witchcraft, totemism, shamanism, and trance states. Offered according to demand.

ANT
521
Hours
3
Ethnography

Ethnography is a hallmark of anthropology. It is at once a theoretical approach, set of methods, and style of writing. This course highlights ethnographic theory, methods for collecting ethnographic material, and techniques for writing about culture by reading exemplary texts, discussing key concepts, and practicing various methods. Each student will develop an ethnographic project that involves fieldwork, data analysis, and writing.

ANT
526
Hours
3
Arch East North Amer

An examination of the origin and development of pre-Columbian and early historic cultures of eastern North America. Offered according to demand.

ANT
528
Hours
3
Analytical Archaeology

Contemporary issues in concept formation, theory construction, methods, and techniques. Offered according to demand.

ANT
538
Hours
3
Anthropology of Art

The course views the art that societies past and present produce; it explores culture, creativity, and human beings' distinctive compulsion to make decorative objects.

Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing; or permission of instructor
ANT
541
Hours
3
Documenting Justice I

Interdisciplinary course in ethnographic filmmaking, focusing particularly on analyzing the many dimensions of culture and social experience. Students produce a short documentary film on a story of justice or injustice in Alabama. First semester of a two semester course.

ANT
542
Hours
3
Documenting Justice II

Interdisciplinary course in ethnographic filmmaking, focusing particularly on analyzing the many dimensions of culture and social experience. Students produce a short documentary film on a story of justice or injustice in Alabama. A two semester course.

ANT
543
Hours
3
Adv Field Archaeology

Directed field study in the excavation and analysis of archaeological deposits. Each student must design and conduct a research project, then adequately report the results. Off campus.

ANT
544
Hours
3
Anthropology And Cemeteries

No description available.

ANT
545
Hours
3
Historical Archaelology

12 hours of anthropology or permission of instructor; graduate standing This course combines the methods used in historical archaelogy with a basic survey of the archaeological record of the historic period of North America.

ANT
550
Hours
3
Probs In Anthropology

Devoted to issues not covered in other courses. Offered according to demand.

ANT
562
Hours
3
Ancient Andean Civilizations

The Andes is a region of geographic and environmental extremes that witnessed the early rise of complex societies long before the Inca Empire. In this course, we examine the prehispanic cultures that resided in this region—from the peopling of South America to the aftermath of Spanish Conquest.

ANT
563
Hours
3
Anthropology of Landscape and Ecology

This course explores anthropological theories and methods of space, place, and environment. It concentrates on ethnographic and archaeological discussions of landscape and ecology. Anthropologists who study landscape and ecology focus on the cultural practices through which communities in the past and present produce the socially meaningful sites, shrines, and physical features of their environment, while also taking into account how the environment influences people’s social actions and underlies people's deepest cultural values. To understand a landscape or an ecology, then, is to examine the interrelation of various social and environmental, cultural and material phenomena. The course also introduces the field and laboratory methods that anthropologists employ to apply their theoretical perspectives on landscape and ecology.

ANT
568
Hours
3
Ceramics for the Archaeologist

Ceramics are the most ubiquitous and variable materials on many archaeological sites and, as such, they offer archaeologists a vast amount of information about the past. In this class, we approach ceramics from the perspective of research questions, and investigate how analytical techniques can help address them. The class also has a large practical component. Students will conduct analyses on collections and present their findings at the end of the class. This course is meant to provide a framework for developing hypotheses, methods and skills directly applicable to senior projects, MA theses, and Ph.D. dissertations.

Prerequisite(s): Graduate students must have collections in hand at the start of the course.
ANT
571
Hours
3
Fossil Man P Evolution

A survey of the discoveries, methods, and theories that provide the background for modern research in macroevolution.

ANT
573
Hours
4
Human Osteology

A detailed introduction to human osteology, emphasizing the identification of fragmentary remains and the criteria for determination of age, sex, and race. Offered according to demand.

ANT
574
Hours
3
Neuroanthropology

This course provides an introduction to evolutionary and biocultural approaches within anthropology to the central and peripheral nervous systems and their interconnections. Topics include the evolution of the brain; how culture and social structure shape the brain, its development, and its activity; and anthropological perspectives on connections among culture, behavior, brain, mind, and body.

ANT
575
Hours
3
Biology, Culture, & Evolution

An introduction to the biocultural and evolutionary bases of human adaptability.

ANT
578
Hours
3
Anthro of Human Development

Health culturally competent socialized adults and mature physical forms arise from a developmental process with evolutionary, biological, social and cultural dimensions. We survey child/human development from an anthropological perspective, considering interactons across levels of analysis from genes to culture.

ANT
579
Hours
3
Human Paelopathology

Course investigates skeletal pathology and trauma. Topics included: 1. Understanding disease processes, 2. Distinguishing accidental and violent trauma on bone, 3. Recognizing the following conditions in skeletal remains: congential anomalies, circulatory disorders, joint diseases, infectious diseases, metabolic diseases, skeletal dysplasias, neoplastic conditions, diseases of the dentition and other conditions. Students will inventory, evaluate and analyze sets of human skeletal remains for pathology and trauma and complete final reports on those remains.

ANT
581
Hours
3
Anthropology is Elementary: Teaching Anthropology in Primary and Secondary Settings

This course is an introduction to teaching anthropology at the primary and secondary levels. It is a service-learning course, which means that all students will serve as instructors in a local anthropology course offered in the Tuscaloosa area. This course will expose students to applied anthropology through teaching the anthropological perspective via an activity-based four-subfield curriculum in conjunction with local elementary schools, after-school programs, or similar community partners. These programs will be taught by teams, and each student will be responsible for attending weekly course meetings, developing curricular material and implementing it in a classroom setting, and co-teaching with other students.

ANT
598
Hours
1-9
Individ Investigations

Directed nonthesis research in archaeology, cultural anthropology, anthropological linguistics, or physical anthropology.

ANT
599
Hours
1-6
Thesis Research

No description available.

ANT
600
Hours
3
Research Methods

Prepares students in the scientific method and research skills used in anthropology. Instruction emphasizes grant writing, study design, interview and observation techniques, and the collection, management, and analysis of data using a statistical software package.

ANT
601
Hours
3
Advanced Research Methods

This seminar is designed to refine doctoral students' background in qualitative and quantitative research methods necessary for dissertation research. Emphasis is placed on the integration of qualitative and quantitative methods for students doing ethnographic research, and techniques of numerical induction for archaeology students.

ANT
603
Hours
3
Theory & Method In Archaelogy

An examination of contemporary archaeological theory and method and their development during the 19th and 20th centuries.

ANT
604
Hours
3
Sem Archaeolgy Complex Society

Contemporary issues in the archaeology of complex societies, including different aspects of complexity and attempts to classify and measure them.

ANT
610
Hours
3
Theory Method Medical Anthropl

A detailed introduction to theory and method in medical anthropology. Approaches include adaptation, biocultural, psychoanalytic, stress, and other theoretical perspectives.

Prerequisite(s): ANT 511 and ANT 600
ANT
612
Hours
3
Sem Biocultural Anthropology

A biocultural overview of the anthropology of health. Topics include biological and cultural approaches to various dimensions of human health and illness.

ANT
620
Hours
3
Prehistory Of North America

An in-depth examination of the prehistory of the various areas of North America, focusing on environmental and cultural influences that affected ways of life.

ANT
621
Hours
3
Native Americans Ethnohy Persp

An examination of Indians and Eskimos of North America during the historical period, focusing on the impact of European contact on culture and society.

ANT
625
Hours
3
Survey History Archaeology

A critical examination of archaeology's history as a science, with emphasis on intellectual trends, changes in method and theory, and recent developments. Offered once a year.

ANT
640
Hours
3
Landmarks Anthropologcl Resear

This course examines seminal works in the history of anthropology. Works may include books or smaller publications that exemplify important developments in theory and method.

ANT
641
Hours
3
Culture

This seminar reviews past and contemporary theories and approaches used in cultural anthropology.

ANT
667
Hours
3
Meth Prehistoric Iconography

An exploration of anthropological and art-historical concepts as applied to the problem of meaning in prehistoric representational art.

ANT
670
Hours
3
Prin Physical Anthropology

A series of seminars and lectures designed to refine the student's knowledge of research on nonhuman primates, fossil hominids, population genetics, and human variation and adaptation. Offered once a year.

ANT
698
Hours
1-9
Individual Investigations

Directed dissertation research in archaeology, cultural anthropology, anthropological linguistics, or physical anthropology.

ANT
699
Hours
1-15
Dissertation Research

No description available.

MUSM
500
Hours
3
Museum Internship

This course is normally taken near the end of the museum studies program after the majority of other required courses have been completed. For the internship, students will develop a project proposal for a 40-hour unpaid internship at a host museum of their choice. Once the proposal is approved by the MUSM Internship Coordinator and MUSM Chair, students will complete the internship at their chosen host museum and be evaluated by their host museum supervisor and MUSM Internship Coordinator.

Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in the MUSM program, completion of at least two of the required courses (MUSM 501, MUSM 502, and MUSM 503), Academic Advisor’s approval of the internship proposal, and MUSM Administrator’s approval of the internship proposal.
MUSM
501
Hours
3
Museum Administration

This course utilizes case studies, analysis of timely topical issues, and problem-based learning exercises to explore many facets of museum studies relevant to administration and management in not-for-profit museums of various types (art, history, natural history, or science/technology). Intended for students considering a career in arts administration, or museums specifically, this course provides an inter-disciplinary introduction to museum work. Students will gain an understanding of the history and philosophy of museums, the role of museums in society, collecting policies, governance, strategic planning, budgeting, grant-writing, museum ethics, multicultural issues, and legal issues in museums. Behind-the-scenes visits to museums and guest speakers will be included.

MUSM
502
Hours
3
Museum Collections Management

This course considers the intellectual, physical, legal, financial, social, and ethical challenges of preserving and providing access to museum collections. Through lectures, readings, hands-on activities, and field trips students explore the theory and practice of collections management and learn how to maximize available resources for collections care in any museum regardless of size.

Prerequisite(s): This course has no prerequisites. Students are expected only to have an interest in the course topic and content, a willingness to be active participants in the learning community that the course is designed to create, and the time and energy to complete the required in-class and out-of-class learning activities and assignments.
MUSM
503
Hours
3
Museum Education and Exhibition

This course provides an overview of museum exhibition and education initiatives; two of the most important functions of all museums. The emphasis of the first part of the course will be on critiquing, designing and presenting museum exhibitions to various audiences. As exhibition and education are intricately linked in museums, the education component of this course will explore various ways to engage the visiting public through museum displays as well as other public outreach programs. Students should be prepared to not only design appealing museums displays but also successfully export their content in various formats to various publics that include schoolchildren.

Prerequisite(s): This course has no prerequisites. Students are expected only to have an interest in the course topic and content, a willingness to be active participants in the learning community that the course is designed to create, and the time and energy to complete the required in-class and out-of-class learning activities and assignments.