Department of American Studies (AMS)

The Master of Arts program in American Studies is designed to enable students to study American culture from a broad, interdisciplinary perspective, combining basic cultural studies with advanced professional training. Drawing upon the graduate resources of the University at large, students develop individually tailored programs of coursework that reflect their own special interests. Students may pursue an academic track or a professional track. Our graduates have used the MA in American Studies as preparation for positions in journalism, public relations, library service, historical preservation, community organizing, private foundations, law, and education.

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Programs

Faculty

Chair
  • Lynne Adrian

Courses

AMS
500
Hours
1-3
Internship

An internship opportunity that combines independent study and practical field work focusing on a particular problem or topic related to American culture and experience. Recent examples include internships in museum management, historic preservation, archaeological research, television production, category fiction, promotion of academic programs, documentary television, academic public relations, with Alabama Heritage and Louisville magazines, and with the Paul Bryant Museum.

AMS
501
Hours
3
Black Intellectual Thought

Graduate Standing. A graduate seminar designed to provide students with an in depth study of major intellectual debates and movements that have shaped the politics, history, and identities of the people of African descent in the United States and the African diaspora. The course will combine methodologies and concepts from multiple disciplines including history, political theory, literature, women's studies, sociology, psychology and philosophy.

AMS
505
Hours
1-3
Directed Study

No description available.

AMS
506
Hours
1-3
Directed Study

No description available.

AMS
507
Hours
3
Landscapes of the South

This seminar explores the cultural, social, and natural ecology of the Mississippi watershed from St. Louis to the Gulf Coast. This interdisciplinary American Studies course examines the river dubbed “the Body of the Nation,” its history, cultural geography, and geophysical ecology. Through readings in history, literary accounts, and artistic expressions, we explore effects of human interventions in nature and nature’s impact on the course of human events.

AMS
509
Hours
3
Memory, Identity and Politics: Gender, Race, and Class

This interdisciplinary graduate seminar explores the ways in which memory and the past construct political identities and the interplay of race, class, gender, and ethnicity in its social construction through readings, discussion, and student research. Reading selections include core theoretical texts on memory studies and specific case studies on topics, including not but exclusive to the American Civil War memory, U.S. South, slavery, and Reconstruction. Issues and questions are: how memories are constructed, translated into identities and political action; bases of shared memories and contested memories; political memorialization and the effects of collective amnesia; and how “communities of memory” are developed, sustained, and dissolved.

Prerequisite(s): None
AMS
512
Hours
3
On The Road

This course seeks to introduce the breadth and power of the travel culture that defines "America" and examines enduring features when writers take to the open road in America.

AMS
515
Hours
3
Service Learning

Course examines immigrant journey and life in American South to gain an understanding of historical and contemporary issues through research and service.

AMS
516
Hours
3
American Environmental Thought

Popular conceptions of nature hold extraordinary power in shaping our responses and policies toward both the geophysical world and built environments. This interdisciplinary course examines key concepts and controversies in American thought about nature since before colonization. Using accounts from various regions, the course explores evolving conceptions of nature and justice, competing claims about race and class, and changing institutional responses and remedies to environmental degradation in the context of global change.

AMS
520
Hours
3
Mark Twain's America: America's Mark Twain

This course begins with the premise that Mark Twain is alive and well. The course will balance consideration of the life, work, and times of America’s most celebrated author as well as his impact on popular culture to this day—from film adaptations of his work, to pop-culture references, to the traditions of American humor, to tourists abroad, etc. Students will examine Mark Twain as the “Lincoln of Our Literature” and as an American icon. The course will require careful consideration of the life and work of Samuel Clemens, the man who would later become Mark Twain, the most famous American of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. We will read and discuss several of his works in context with his times, and we will explore how his legacy affects our own. Why was he so popular, and why does he remain so popular? Students will encounter a wide range of intellectual and emotional interactions with American culture through the mind of Mark Twain, and, likewise, filter much of American popular culture through the lens of the world he created and reported to the world in his literary output. Students will consider, in addition, their own relationship to Mark Twain’s America.

Prerequisite(s): Graduate admission.
AMS
521
Hours
3
Writer & Artist in America

This course offers a comparative examination of responses by 20th century literary and visual artists to perceived social crises and challenges to American cultural values, such as sex in the early 20th century American city, working class struggles during the Great Depression, issues of atomic anxiety during the early years of the Cold War, the ethical dilemmas of the Vietnam War, the perils of the AIDS/HIV crisis, and the flourishing of contemporary consumer culture. The course also introduces several important movements in twentieth century American arts and letters, including Naturalism, Modernism, Social Realism, the Beat movement, Social Surrealism, and Postmodernism.

AMS
522
Hours
3
Popular Culture in America

Survey and analysis of 20th century US popular culture including social context and how it has reflected and shaped American society, including gender, race, class and region.

AMS
523
Hours
3
The Roots of American Music

This class surveys American music from ragtime, blues, and hillbilly to Broadway, Hollywood musicals, and swing jazz. Our focus will be on commercial mainstreams and democratic audiences – how selling sound led to different identities being expressed through taste and style. Race, gender, class, sexuality, age, technology, and the music business will all factor as we move from blackface minstrelsy in the 1800s to World War II. We will listen closely to several songs each week, connecting music to larger themes through primary and secondary sources, regular writing, and in-class discussion.

AMS
529
Hours
3
American between the Wars

Explores first two decades of America's "Modern Times" (1919-1941) when Americans redefined themselves and their society.

AMS
530
Hours
3
Special Topics

Selected American topics in American Studies offered by AMS faculty members or Americanists from related departments. Recent example: Women in America.

AMS
531
Hours
3
Studies In Pop Culture

Research and discussion of selected topics in American popular culture: literature, music, network broadcasting, advertising, film, and drama.

AMS
532
Hours
3
Studies In The Arts

Research and discussion of selected topics in literature, film, painting, photography, and architecture, and the role of the artist in 19th- and 20th-century America.

AMS
534
Hours
3
Studies In The South

Research and discussion of selected topics in Southern culture: ethnicity, regional consciousness, women in the South, and change and continuity.

AMS
535
Hours
3
Studies In Gender

Research and discussion of selected topics in ethnicity, class, and gender in America.

AMS
536
Hours
3
Studies Social Experience

Research and discussion of selected topics in the American social experience.

AMS
537
Hours
3
Studies In The West

Research and discussion of selected topics in the American West as period, place, experience, and imagination: discovery and exploration; physical and cultural transformation; and value, ethic, and ideal.

AMS
538
Hours
3
African American Culture

Research and discussion of selected topics in African-American culture.

AMS
539
Hours
3
Urban Spaces

This interdisciplinary social science course provides an introduction to the cultural and physical ecology of cities, focusing primarily on urbanization in the United States from the late 19th century to the present. Course readings include classical scholars in urbanism and urban design. Contemporary urban environmental histories explore population shifts and land use along the urban gradient from the suburbs to urban centers, with attention to water, sewer, and transportation infrastructure, pollution, and urban sprawl.

AMS
540
Hours
3
Black Feminisms

This graduate course provides a capacious overview of Black Feminist theory, social criticism, literature, art and politics. Over the next fifteen weeks students will read key essays/ texts of “classic” black feminism; chart its origins in black women’s political activism and experiences; assess new “schools” of thought like hip-hop feminism and pleasure politics; trace the influence of black feminism in black queer studies and critical race theory; and debate the “viability” of black feminism/ black feminist scholars in the 21st century academy.

Prerequisite(s): None
AMS
541
Hours
3
Silences Broken, Silences Kept: Black Sexuality Studies in Historical Perspective

In her 1999 survey on African American’s women’s and gender history, Michele Mitchell voiced her “lurking suspicions that certain subjects [within African American History] are avoided because they have been deemed either dangerous or damaging.” Chief among these are the sexual acts and identities of people of African descent in North America. Using her framework of “silences broken and silences kept,” this course examines historically minded interdisciplinary scholarship about black sexual intimacies, marriage, reproduction, family, sexual identities and gender politics. Although this course primarily focuses on the history of black sexuality, it touches on a host of other subjects (including race, gender, class, popular culture, etc.) and disciplines (sociology, political science, literary studies, cultural studies, performance studies, etc.). This course analyzes dominant methodologies/ preoccupations of studies about black sexuality as well as areas of burgeoning scholarly interest.

Prerequisite(s): None
AMS
545
Hours
3
The "Good War"

A topical examination of the American Experience at home and abroad, 1941-1945.

AMS
546
Hours
3
Gender and Environment

This course examines histories of concepts of nature and gender, philosophies of eco-feminism, and accounts of gender-based efforts for environmental reform. Texts include histories of environmental concepts and reform campaigns, broadly conceived, including slave narratives, accounts of experiences in the women’s club movement, the conservation movement, and Progressive Era occupational and public health reform, along with more well-known twentieth century nature writers, contemporary scholars, and activists. 3.

AMS
565
Hours
3
Fictions of American Identity

Examination of American culture from before the Civil War to post Civil Rights Movement studying representations of the American experience.

AMS
570
Hours
3
Natives and Newcomers: Cross-Cultural Encounters in Early America

The colonization efforts of European empires in the early modern period led to cross-cultural encounters between societies previously unfamiliar with one another, introducing each of them to unfamiliar ideas, cultures, political systems, and landscapes and changing their lives in profound ways. This course explores the complex interactions between Native American, European, and African peoples in North America, with a particular focus on the region that is currently the Southeastern United States. Such cross-cultural contact could result in valuable collaborations, deep misunderstandings, violence, or contests for power. How were interactions with unfamiliar peoples described and understood by Native Americans, Europeans, and African peoples in North America? How did the circulation of peoples and cultures shape ideas about ‘America’ and ‘Americaness’? Is ‘encounter’ a single event, or a long process? This course meets a college core writing requirement; a demonstration of writing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.

AMS
585
Hours
3
American Experience to 1865

An exploration of the formative years of the American cultural experience, from early European encounters with the New World to the attainment of continental nationhood. The course will draw upon insights from many disciplines and will include several kinds of cultural evidence (for example: literature, art, and photography; religious, political, and social thought and behavior; and economic, technological, and geographical development) as well as consideration of recent major synthetic works of cultural scholarship. Topics covered include the growth of colonial societies; the Revolutionary movement and the political foundations of the American Republic; the Market Revolution and the rise of middle-class culture; the antebellum South and the emerging West; and the origins and evolution of American cultural diversity. Offered fall semester.

AMS
586
Hours
3
American Exper Since 1865

An exploration of the development of the American cultural experience since 1865, focusing on the major material forces and intellectual currents that helped shape American attitudes, assumptions, institutions, behavior, and values. The course will draw upon insights from many disciplines and will include several kinds of cultural evidence (for example: literature, art, and photography; religious, political, and social thought and behavior; and economic, technological, and geographical development) as well as consideration of recent major synthetic works of cultural scholarship. Topics addressed and readings assigned are chosen to enlarge awareness of the transformation of America to a diverse, metropolitan, industrial society. These will include the relationship between nature and the city; the industrial revolution and changes in the workplace; immigration; changing class and gender relationships; the rise of leisure; and the development and triumph of modern corporate/consumer culture. Offered spring semester.

AMS
588
Hours
1
Teaching Internship

Required of all American Studies graduate teaching assistants assigned to AMS 150. Includes administrative techniques and test construction.

AMS
589
Hours
3
Approaches Teaching Ams

A study of basic approaches to interdisciplinary teaching in American culture at the college level, along with supervised teaching experience.

AMS
591
Hours
3
American Period Seminar

In-depth study of a particular period or era in American historical experience. Recent examples include the Ragtime Era, the Jazz Age, the Great Depression, the Season of 1954-55, the '60s, contemporary America, the Postwar Period, the Romantic Revolutionaries (1905-14), the American Avant Garde (1893-1920), World War II: the Good War, the South and '30s Expression, the Civil Rights movement, the '50s, America between the Wars, the Colonial Period, the Aspirin Age, Postmodern America, Contemporary America, and Writing West.

AMS
592
Hours
3
American Topic Seminar

Study of special topics within the American cultural experience. Recent examples include American literary realism, women in America, the Civil Rights movement, the picture press, music and ethnicity, the politics of culture, regionalism in American culture, the changing American family, homelessness in America, American autobiography, American monuments, contemporary American folklore, Southern popular culture, Southern iconoclasts, politics and culture, historical memory, America by design, the other in America, women in America, race in America, 19th-century popular culture, and slavery and the Civil War in historic memory.

AMS
595
Hours
3
Ams Colloquium: Res & Methods

Discussion of methodological and theoretical issues in American Studies.

AMS
596
Hours
3
Ams Colloquium: Scholarly Writ

Presentation of research and methods.

Prerequisite(s): None. Corequisite: AMS 586.
AMS
597
Hours
1
Topics Amer Cult Analys

Coordinating course required of M.A. candidates in their final semester.

AMS
598
Hours
1-3
Non-Thesis Research

Non-Thesis Research.