Geography Courses

GY
101
N
Hours
4
Atmospheric Proc & Patterns

Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory period. Earth-space relations, latitude and longitude, seasons, time, weather, climate, and vegetation. Particular attention is given to the causes of weather and climate and why they tend to be different from place to place.

Natural Science
GY
102
N
Hours
4
Earth Surface Processes

Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory period. Study of earth-surface processes, with consideration of human interaction with the physical environment. Subjects include landforms, water resources, soils, and mapping the physical environment.

Natural Science
GY
105
SB
Hours
3
World Regional Geography

Introduction to geography through a survey of the world's major geographic regions. Examines their physical and cultural features, economies, and populations.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
GY
110
SB
Hours
3
People, Places, and Environment

Introduction to geography as a science for learning the fundamentals of human behavior and decision making. Examines how human events, natural resources, economies, development, and urbanization impact the way humankind lives, organizes its space, and makes decisions for the future.

Social and Behavioral Sciences
GY
200
Hours
3
Principles Of Planning

Survey of the basic elements of regional and urban planning. Provides a comprehensive overview of the planning profession.

GY
202
N
Hours
4
The Water Planet

This course is about water on earth, and the content will integrate scientific elements from the disciplines of atmospheric science, geography, geology, hydrology, oceanography, and water resources. The course is organized based on the large-scale elements of the hydrologic cycle and the smaller-scale elements of the water balance concept, especially as they affect water resources.

Natural Science
GY
204
Hours
4
Map & Air Photo Interpretation

Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory period. Fundamentals of map reading and interpretation.

GY
207
N
Hours
4
Field Studies in Water and Climate

Water is one of the most abundant, yet most precious, natural resources on Earth. Its movement and properties are determined by processes occurring within and across many geosystems, including rivers, lakes, glaciers, groundwater, and climate systems. This course explores how different components of Earth’s water system operate and the processes linking the components together. We will also explore how people modify and utilize Earth’s water systems. Our course will be based in Innsbruck, Austria, a geographic location with a variety of water systems, including glaciers, which have very strong ties to Earth’s climate system. We will take fieldtrips to local glaciers and rivers to examine how water systems operate in the “real world” and learn techniques used to measure and understand how these systems change over space and time. We will also take fieldtrips to Prague, Czech Republic and Munich, Germany to better understand how humans modify water systems, through processes such as river regulation. GY 207 is designated a natural science (NS) course.

Natural Science
GY
230
C
Hours
3
Geographic Information Systems

This course will offer practical GIS training for non-geography majors. It will focus on geospatial data representation and analysis in ArcGIS.

Prerequisite(s): CS 102
Computer Science
GY
302
Hours
3
Climatology

Introduce the fundamentals of the earth-atmosphere system as they comprise the climate of Earth, drive spatial and temporal climate variability, and impact life.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101
GY
317
Hours
3
Natural Hazards

Examination of the causes, consequences, and spatial distribution of climatic, geomorphic, and human-induced natural hazards.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101 or GY 102
GY
330
C
Hours
4
Computr Mapping Graphics

Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory period. Introduction to computer graphics and their application in both the natural and social sciences, with special emphasis on mapping. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): GY 204 and CS 102
Computer Science
GY
339
Hours
3
Natural Resource Envirmn Plang

Analyzes human interactions with the physical environment and ways of dealing with them. Integrates environmental science, social science, and planning, and includes environmental impact assessment.

GY
341
Hours
3
Geography Of Us And Canada

Study of the physical and human geography of the United States and Canada.

GY
344
Hours
3
Geography Of Africa

Study of the physical and human geography of Africa.

GY
345
Hours
3
Geography of Latin America

This course is designed to provide a regional survey of Latin America’s environments and peoples from a geographic perspective. The course presents the physical landscape as well as the changing environment in Latin America. The course then explores the major historical, cultural, and economical aspects of the region. The course will have an emphasis in processes that shape the major contemporary issues, such as development, urbanization, and environmental change.

GY
346
Hours
3
Geography of Europe

This course is designed to provide a regional survey of Europe in terms of economic activities and the physcial environment. Special emaphasis is on the historical development of European landscapes.

GY
351
Hours
3
Geography Of Alabama

Study of the varied geographical dimensions of the state of Alabama, both past and present.

GY
358
Hours
3
Urban Geography

Examines the growth of cities, their spatial distributions, internal dynamics, functional bases, and social and political patterns.

Prerequisite(s): GY 110
GY
363
Hours
3
Geomorphology

Study of physical, chemical and biological processes operating at the Earth's surface and landforms, and the landscapes such processes develop.

Prerequisite(s): GY 102 or GEO 101
GY
365
W
Hours
3
Industrial Develop & Location

Systematic study of the principles and processes underlying the development, location, and spatial organization of economic activities from both a national and international perspective. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): GY 110
Writing
GY
370
Hours
3
Special Topics

No description available.

GY
375
Hours
3
Sports Geography

Sports are an important part of society and contribute billions of dollars to the global economy. This course examines the geographic dimensions of sports, primarily in North America, with some reflections on Europe for contrast. The geography of sports can be analyzed through the use of concepts found in a variety of human geography subdisciplines, including cultural, historical, economic, population, urban, and political geography. The course covers a variety of topics and helps students develop a holistic view of sports with regards to spatial interactions. Geography courses explain why things are where they are on the surface of the Earth. In other words, students develop a spatial perspective in thinking about their surroundings.

GY
377
Hours
3
Cultural Geography

Study of the way in which culture influences elements of both physical and human landscapes with emphasis on how cultures are spread over space and how cultures make sense of space.

Prerequisite(s): GY 105 or GY 110
GY
385
Hours
3
Watershed Management Plan Development

This course is designed to be primarily an experiential course and will address development and implementation of a Watershed Management Plan. The North River Watershed Management Plan will be used as a working model and students will review theory before carrying out experiential learning in the field.

GY
404
Hours
3
Physical Geography Seast Us

A study of the physical landscapes in the southeastern United States. Emphasis is on the geological setting, geomorphic features, climate, soils, and vegetation, and the interrelationships of these conditions that shape the landscape in this region.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101 and GY 102; or GEO 101
GY
405
Hours
1-3
Dir Res Physical Geog

Hands-on, problem solving in the field of physical geography.

GY
406
Hours
1-3
Dir Res Human Geography

Hands-on, problem solving in the field of human geography.

GY
409
Hours
4
Forest History and Restoration

This course covers the theories, tools and techniques used in historical ecology with a focus on the establishment of reference conditions for habitat conservation and restoration efforts.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101 or GY 102
GY
410
Hours
3
The Geography of National Parks

This course is devoted to the changing geography of the national park system and protected areas, with an emphasis on their design, planning, and operations.

Prerequisite(s): GY 110
GY
412
Hours
3
Hydroclimatology

To provide a basic understanding of the waters of Earth, especially with relation to the effects of precipitation and evaporation upon the occurence and character of water in streams, lakes and on or below the land surface.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101 and GY 302
GY
413
Hours
3
Applied Climatology

Applied Climatology is a graduate/senior level course designed to expand upon fundamental concepts learned in GY 101. Within this broad field, a specific focus in GY 413 concentrates upon climate and human health/behavior, and human modification of climate. The course contains a mixture of lecture, lab, and field assignments.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101
GY
414
Hours
3
Climate Change and Health

This course is an introduction to the effect of global climate change on health. The course will be taught from a geographical perspective and will introduce students to the physical science of climate change and the impact it has on health through discussion of extreme weather events, altered ecological systems, and threats to human security and welfare. Discussion will build on the core concepts of climate change science to provide students with a solid foundation to further examine a variety of topics from acute impacts such as heat waves and other weather extremes to chronic conditions such as shifting disease vector habitats, degraded air quality, and food security. Direct correlations between health impacts and climate change will be emphasized throughout as will discussion of mitigation and adaptation strategies.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101
GY
415
Hours
3
The Geography of Extinctions and Endangered Species

This course examines the individuals, institutions, research, controversies, and policies that have developed around wildlife extinction, ecological problems associated with extinction, and endangered species. The course also examines the stories of several lost or vanishing species. This course, which has been developed out of the instructor's current research projects, uses lectures, readings, student-led discussions, writing assignments, and one exam to explore how humans have contributed to, while at the same time grappling with, the issue of wildlife conservation and extinction.

GY
417
W
Hours
3
Extreme Weather and Society

EW&S is an integrated physical and social science seminar class consisting of readings, discussion, and lectures on perception, understanding, and communication of severe weather hazards.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101
Writing
GY
420
C
Hours
4
Remote Sensing I

Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory period. Introduction to the basic principles of electromagnetic radiation, interaction between energy and earth features, remote sensing instruments, and information extraction from remotely sensed data. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): GY 204 and CS 102
Computer Science
GY
424
Hours
3-9
Cartography Practicum

Individual work experience in cartography, supervised by faculty and staff of The University of Alabama. A maximum of 3 hours of internship or practicum credit can be applied to the geography major. Credit for GY 424 cannot be applied to the geography minor.

GY
425
Hours
3-9
Cartography Internship

Individual work experience on a cartographic project, supervised by the staff of an off-campus agency. A maximum of 3 hours of internship or practicum credit can be applied to the geography major. Credit for GY 425 cannot be applied to the geography minor.

GY
430
C
Hours
1,3
Intro Geographic Info Systems

Three hours lecture and one hour laboratory period. Introduces the basic concepts of GIS, including definition and components of GIS, spatial data structures, data sources, data input, manipulation and analysis, applications of GIS, and managing GIS. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): GY 204 and CS 102
Computer Science
GY
431
Hours
4
GIS in Emergency Management

Addresses geo-spatial data, methods, and software used in mitigation, planning, response, and recovery phases of emergency management. Case studies and scenarios are drawn from meteorological, environmental, geological, and biological hazards and disasters.

Prerequisite(s): GY 430
GY
432
Hours
1-4
Spec Research In Geog

No description available.

GY
433
Hours
3-9
Gis Practicum

Individual work experience in GIS, supervised by the faculty and staff of The University of Alabama. A maximum of 3 hours of internship or practicum credit can be applied to the geography major. Credit for GY 433 cannot be applied to the geography minor.

GY
434
Hours
3-9
Gis Internship

Individual work experience in GIS, supervised by the staff of an off-campus agency. A maximum of 3 hours of internship or practicum credit can be applied to the geography major. Credit for GY 434 cannot be applied to the geography minor.

GY
435
C
Hours
4
Remote Sensing II

Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory period. Analysis and extraction of thematic information from nonphotographic remotely sensed data for geographic information systems. Topics include image processing, image enhancement, and image classification. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): GY 420
Computer Science
GY
436
C
Hours
4
Adv Geographic Info Syst

Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory period. Evaluation of case studies, spatial model development, and database design for geographic information systems. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): GY 430
Computer Science
GY
437
Hours
4
GIS for Transportation

The application of Geographic Information Systems to transportation has resulted in a sub-field known as GIS-T. This course will provide a hands-on introduction to GIS-T.

Prerequisite(s): GY 204
GY
438
Hours
4
Application Issues In Gis

Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory period. In-depth study of various topics in the application and technical issues of geographic information systems. Computing proficiency is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): GY 430
GY
439
Hours
4
GIS Programming

This course focuses on the extension of geographic information systems (GIS) through programming as well as on the development of stand-alone algorithms for spatial analysis and numerical modeling.

Prerequisite(s): GY 230 (proposed) or GY 430
GY
440
W
Hours
3
Commun Facil Planning

Principles, processes, and analysis of public facility location planning, with emphasis on the spatial search process, impact analysis, and public facility location models.

Writing
GY
441
Hours
3
Land Use Regulations

Theory and use of zoning, eminent domain, taxing and police powers, enabling acts, charters, official maps, codes, nuisance ordinances, and environmental impact statements in community planning.

Prerequisite(s): GY 200
GY
442
Hours
4
GIS in Biogeography

Addresses the application of GIS data and methods in analyzing geographic distribution and trends of plants and animals. Labs draw data and methods from a variety of biogeographic contexts including historical, modern, terrestrial, marine, conservation, and climate change.

Prerequisite(s): GY 430
GY
444
Hours
6
Field Studies In Africa

Three-week intensive field study in Ghana. Explores geographical perspectives on Africa's level of development and the responses of the African peoples to their circumstances.

GY
450
Hours
4
Conservation Field Studies in Belize

Study Belize’s diverse rainforests, coral reefs, and visit Mayan ruins for a glimpse into a past civilization. Belize is unique in that it still contains relatively undisturbed rainforests and the longest barrier reef in the Western Hemisphere. However, while Belize has emerged as an international leader regarding conservation efforts, threats from climate change, poverty, and development still exist. The purpose of this course is 1) examine current conservation efforts to safeguard this biodiversity; 2) familiarize students with the most important aspects of tropical lowland terrestrial and marine ecosystems; 3) understand the role of local culture in sustainable conservation; 4) gain an understanding of the fundamental importance of biodiversity; and 5) expose students to new and unique cultures and environments. The course is designed for students who are interested in conservation issues, biogeography, marine sciences, ornithology and birding, archaeology, and outdoor adventures.

Prerequisite(s): GY 102
GY
452
Hours
3
Environ Decision Making

Review of the history of natural resources in the U.S. and current environmental topics, followed by discussion of techniques to facilitate environmental decision making and management.

GY
453
W
Hours
3
Environment & Society

Exploration of the linkages between the biophysical environment and human social systems. Public policy implications are viewed from a social science perspective. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): GY 110
Writing
GY
454
Hours
4
Costa Rica Field Studies: Tropical Ecology, Conservation, and Development

This program with provide students with a broad interdisciplinary experience encompassing tropical ecology, conservation and development (TECD) in a highly experiential learning context.

GY
455
Hours
3-9
Planning Practicum

Individual work experience in planning, supervised by faculty and staff of The University of Alabama. A maximum of 3 hours of internship or practicum credit can be applied to the geography major. Credit for GY 455 cannot be applied to the geography minor.

GY
456
Hours
3-9
Planning Internship

Individual work experience in planning, supervised by the staff of an off-campus agency. A maximum of 3 hours of internship or practicum credit can be applied to the geography major. Credit for GY 456 cannot be applied to the geography minor.

GY
458
W
Hours
3
Urban Planning And Analysis

A study of contemporary urban landscapes, political and economic power structures, and resultant conflicts. Includes an in-depth analysis of the role of externalities, the urban planner, urban policymaking, and analytical methods in the planning and administration of urban landscapes.

Writing
GY
460
Hours
3
Environmental Management

Introduces students to the impact of humans on the planet and the patterns of human behavior necessary to preserve and manage the environment in a self-sustaining manner. Emphasis is on writing and speaking.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101
GY
463
Hours
4
Ecosystem Services: Theory and Practice

This course will prepare students to function effectively as future researchers and policy-makers on topics related to sustainability and sustainable management of ecosystem-oriented projects and activities. The concept of ecosystem services provides one approach to facilitate trade-off decision making to identify win-win strategies among multiple stakeholders with often conflicting near-term objectives.

GY
465
Hours
3
Region Planning Analysis

Principles and processes of regional planning and the analytical methods appropriate for solving regional planning problems. Case studies and the role of the planner in the regional planning process are discussed.

GY
466
Hours
3
Transport Geography

Examines the location and function of the multimodal North American transportation system, the urban transportation planning process and methodologies. Assesses the political and environmental contexts of transport systems, including impacts of continued reliance on the automobile.

Prerequisite(s): GY 105 or GY 110, or instructor permission
GY
470
Hours
3
Special Topics

No description available.

GY
472
Hours
4
Soil Science

Three hours lecture and required field and lab work. Introduction to the study of soils, including soil formation, classification, and the interpretation of soils to reconstruct environmental histories.

GY
473
Hours
3
Public Policy Development in Water Resources

This course will evaluate the current approaches to policy theory and examine systematically the broader implications of the substantive aspects of public policy development in the water resources spectrum. In analysis of public policy development in water resources, the student will look at both policy process and policy substance. Attention will be given to the questions of how and why water policy differs across states, and how one might evaluate policy performance cross-nationally.

GY
477
Hours
3
Water Resources Management, Law, and Policy

The Water Resources Management, Law, and Policy course will provide students with a survey of water resources development, control, law, policy and management with particular emphasis on public policy considerations including: the acquisition and exercise of water rights—appropriative and riparian; groundwater management; water districts and user organizations; environmental considerations; Federal/State relations including interstate allocation; and the Alabama Water Resources Act. The course will also address international water law—the multinational treaties, laws, cases, practices and politics governing Earth’s transboundary freshwater resources (watercourses including rivers, streams, lakes, and groundwater aquifers) shared by two or more countries.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101 and GY 102; or GEO 101
GY
483
Hours
3-9
Environment Science Internship

Individual work experience in environmental science, supervised by the staff of an off-campus agency. A maximum of 3 hours of internship or practicum credit can be applied to the geography major. Credit for GY 483 cannot be applied to the geography minor.

GY
485
Hours
3
River Hydrology

Rivers are dynamic natural systems that are of great importance to ecosystems and society. This course examines river hydrology processes from a physical geography perspective. A major theme of the course will be impacts of human actions on river systems.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101 or GY 102
GY
486
W
Hours
3
Watershed Dynamics

An examination of the physical operation of watersheds focusing on surface water hydrology, erosion, and sedimentation. Writing proficiency within this discipline is required for a passing grade in this course.

Prerequisite(s): GY 102
Writing
GY
489
W
Hours
4
Forest Ecology Veg Analy

Three hours lecture and required field work. Study of the nature of forest communities and the interrelationship of organisms that compose them.

Writing
GY
490
Hours
3-9
Geography Internship

Work experience in an agency involved in geographical analysis. A maximum of 3 hours of internship or practicum credit can be applied to the geography major. Credit for GY 490 cannot be applied to the geography minor.

GY
491
W
Hours
3
Fluvial Geomorphology

This course provides an in-depth investigation of the processes that determine the form and evolution of rivers and streams. Questions addressed by this course include the following. What processes determine the form and evolution of rivers and streams? How can we infer process from form and vice versa? How do river form and process vary spatially and temporally? What principles of fluvial geomorphology are needed for river restoration and management? The course will combine lectures, discussions, field data collection, and modeling activities. This course can be taken for writing credit. Therefore, TWO INDIVIDUAL writing assignments are required. In order to earn a passing grade in this course, you will be required to demonstrate writing proficiency to standards expected for the geosciences. A student who does not write with the skill normally required of an upper division student in the geosciences will not be given a passing grade, no matter how well they perform on other course components.

Prerequisite(s): GY/GEO 363 Geomorphology
Writing
GY
492
Hours
4
Eastern Forest Communities and Silvics

This field course is focused on the biotic and abiotic elements that create distinct forest communities throughout the eastern US, with a particular emphasis on woody plant assemblages including the silvics of dominant and indicator species in different community types. Applications to forest management are stressed.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101 or GY 102 or BSC 114
GY
493
Hours
4
Plant Geography

This course covers basic biotic and abiotic terrestrial ecosystem components, environmental gradients, plant distribution patterns, dispersal, colonization, and migration, disturbance processes, and applications to biodiversity conservation.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101 or GY 102 or BSC 114
GY
494
Hours
4
Forest Measurement & Analysis

This course is designed to provide students with a theoretical foundation and practical experiences in measuring, inventorying, and describing trees, stands, and forests.

Prerequisite(s): GY 101 or GY 102 or BSC 114 or BSC 116
GY
495
Hours
3
Coastal Geomorphology

The coastlines of the world, at the triple interface of land, sea, and air, are dynamic geomorphic environments. They are often subject to abrupt changes, associated with storms for example, as well as slower, long-term changes, such as those associated with sea level change. Coastal environments are home to most of the earth’s human population and they include, at the same time, some of the most hazardous of locations. The purpose of this course is to provide a general introduction to the subject of coastal geomorphology, with emphasis on coastal environments and landforms, and with a survey of coastal processes.

GY
496
Hours
4
Forest Ecosystem Management: Silviculture

In this course silviculture is treated as applied forest ecology. The goal of this course is to provide students with a knowledge of silviculture and its ecological basis so they can design manipulations in forest ecosystems to achieve a range of management objectives. The course requires field trips to tour different sites and visit with forest scientists and managers. In this course students learn about tree growth and stand development and use this information to develop silvicultural prescriptions to meet a diverse range of management goals. We will explore how silvicultural treatments can influence stand structure and composition and how these changes influence timber quantity and quality, forest health, biodiversity, soil, and wildlife habitat among other features. We will also focus on how silviculture is influenced by broader social, economic, and ecological issues.

Prerequisite(s): GY489 or GY409 or GY492 or GY494 or instructor permission