School of Library and Information Studies

The School of Library and Information Studies (SLIS) is a top-ranked program for library, information, and book arts education. SLIS aims to develop creative and critical thinkers and leaders for the information world through a supportive teaching and learning environment, collaborative research, and community engagement.

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Vision

Through excellence in teaching, research, and service, SLIS is committed to educate socially responsible information professionals prepared to empower diverse populations in a multitude of contexts, communities, and cultures.

Mission

To advance the theory, art, and practice of professions specializing in the use and creation of information in traditional and emergent forms.

Values

Since its beginnings more than 40 years ago, SLIS has developed a unique interdisciplinary personality that blends the arts, humanities, and social sciences. We support a mutual belief in and respect for those we serve. This is evident in our strong support of intellectual freedom, access to all, and the tenets of social justice.

Educational Objectives

The educational objectives of these graduate programs are as follows:

Teaching

Provide students with the knowledge, skills, understanding, and diverse technologies to meet the changing informational and cultural needs of diverse populations and organizations. Foster leadership skills and abilities in all students, provide opportunities within the program for students with leadership potential to exercise their abilities, and encourage students as graduates to seek out and assume leadership roles. Improve and develop students' critical and conceptual thinking skills.

Research and creative activity.

Augment and advance knowledge through basic research and improve professional practice through systematic inquiry into its nature, standards, and principles.

Service

Apply the insights and knowledge gained through research and instruction in service to public- and private-sector organizations.

Facilities

SLIS classrooms, faculty offices, and shared spaces are housed on the fifth floor of the Gorgas Library in the heart of the campus. Student spaces provide desktop computing, printing, laptop workstations, individual and group work spaces, professional resources, and a collection of children and youth literature. A student lounge is conveniently located for relaxation and refreshment.

Academic Common Market (ACM)

The School of Library and Information Studies participates in the ACM, an agreement among selected Southern states to share academic programs at in-state tuition rates. Residents of the states of Arkansas, Delaware, Virginia, and West Virginia may make an ACM application to attend the MLIS program. If accepted, The University of Alabama will pay the out-of-state portion of the student’s tuition. Residents of Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Tennessee may apply to the ACM to attend the MFA in book arts program, also with UA’s paying the out-of-state portion of tuition. Background information on the ACM, a list with the contact information for each state’s ACM coordinator, and an online application to the UA Academic Common Market.

A number of departmental assistantships, which not only pay a stipend but also cover some out-of-state fees, as well as a number of scholarships are available each academic year. For information, contact the director of the School of Library and Information Studies.

Faculty

Director
  • Dr. Jim Elmborg
Professors
  • Prof. Anna Embree
  • Dr. Jamie Naidoo
Associate professors
  • Dr. Laurie Bonnici
  • Dr. Steven MacCall
  • Dr. Jeff Weddle
Assistant professors
  • Dr. John Burgess
  • Dr. Robert Riter
  • Dr. Miriam Sweeney
  • Dr. Steven Yates
Instructor
  • Prof. Sarah Bryant
Intern coordinator adjunct professor
  • Prof. Sybil Bullock
Dean and professor emeritus
  • Dr. Charles Osburn

Courses

BA
520
Hours
3
Print I Elements Printing

Craft skills used in fine letterpress printing are introduced in a studio environment. Through a number of printing/publishing experiments and projects, students gain an understanding of the nature and interaction of printing types with inks and papers; learn fundamental terminology; and gain familiarity with the equipment. The emphasis is on setting type, letterpress printing, and basic typographic design.

BA
521
Hours
3
Print II Typograph Printing

Explores contemporary attitudes and innovations in fine printing and fine press publishing through individual printing/publishing projects, as well as a collaborative project. The focus is on typographic design, editorial decision making, color and image integration, and press work.

BA
522
Hours
3-6
Printing III Print/Publ

Students initiate and produce an edition of a relatively extensive book. Emphasis is on production, with manuscript selection and editing being critical aspects. Photopolymer platemaking processes are introduced in a desktop publishing environment adapted to historic tools and media. Such subjects as marketing and distribution of limited-edition books are covered. For those students taking the 6-hour option, a Parallel Editions book may be produced.

BA
523
Hours
3-6
Printing IV: Print Publ

Refinement of typographical sensibility coupled with advanced book production experience, culminating in a limited-edition handmade volume. Direct experience with bookbinders, artists, illustrators, book distributors, and myriad post-production considerations for the fine press printer/publisher.

BA
530
Hours
3
Bookbinding I: Elements Of Bookbinding

Drawing upon both the historic and contemporary Western bookbinding traditions, this course is an initiation into fundamental binding forms, techniques, materials, and design. Through the construction of a series of cloth and paper structures, students will gain an understanding of the properties inherent to the materials and how they work in the context of bookbinding. In addition to the development of good hand skills and proper use of materials, aesthetic and design issues concerning book construction will be addressed.

BA
531
Hours
3
Bookbinding II: Fundamentals of Case Bookbinding

An introduction to the materials and techniques of case bookbinding. Students will continue to refine the fundamental binding skills acquired in BA 530, while being introduced to more advanced materials techniques. Case bookbinding and custom built enclosures will be constructed using paper, cloth, and leather. Students will gain a comprehensive understanding of these skills necessary for completing both one-of-a-kind and edition work.

BA
532
Hours
3-6
Bookbinding III: Intermediate Bookbinding

An introduction to the materials and techniques of leather bookbinding along with the principles of conservation treatments as they relate to the processes of rebinding. Students will study the methods of production of animal skins for book making, the qualities of these skins, and their identification. Instruction in the use of leather-working tools, advanced case binding techniques, and in-board binding construction will be introduced. A strong emphasis will be placed on paper mending, forwarding techniques and leather preparation.

BA
533
Hours
3-6
Bookbinding IV: Advanced Bookbinding

An advanced study of bookbinding and finishing techniques. Students will refine leather-working and binding skills while exploring methods for fine and design work. Readings and discussions will focus on sound binding practices with an emphasis on the art and practice of covering in leather. An advanced final binding project will allow students to demonstrate their mastery of the materials and techniques presented in the binding I-IV course sequence.

BA
534
Hours
3
Boxmaking

An exploration of traditional and experimental forms of boxes and other protective enclosures for books. Boxes serve both aesthetic and functional purposes: they house, protect, and present their contents. Students will learn box making techniques such as measuring, fitting, covering, and casing; these will be considered also in connection with more complex components like partitioning and layering. We will discuss aesthetics in the context of overall design as well as selection of materials and structures appropriate for specific applications.

BA
541
Hours
3
Papermaking

Provides hands-on experience in the fundamentals of making traditional Western-style handmade papers using a variety of fibers. The objective is to produce reference samples of various kinds of sheets, as well as edition sheets of papers for book or art-making purposes.

BA
592
Hours
3
Graduate Symposium

Discusses professional standards, professional presentation and portfolio building, creative project research, exhibition design, management of a small business, marketing, and other topics. Six meetings during the course of the semester.

BA
593
Hours
1-12
Workshops In Book Arts

Workshops covering all subjects in the book arts, held both on and off campus.

BA
594
Hours
3-6
Pract Teaching Book Arts

Practical experience teaching introductory courses in printing, binding, and other appropriate book arts.

BA
595
Hours
1-6
Independent Project

Provides an opportunity for the student to pursue independently a project in the book arts.

BA
596
Hours
1-6
Dir Research Book Arts

Provides an opportunity for an intensive investigation of both historical and technical studies of a book-arts craft.

BA
597
Hours
1-6
Internship

A direct learning experience in a studio of a professional book artist.

BA
599
Hours
1-12
Creative Project Production

The capping experience of the MFA in the book arts program is the creative project, thesis, and exhibition. Working with a faculty advisor, the candidate develops a project that demonstrates a deep understanding of the craft and the aesthetic, historic, and critical contexts of the book; to establish technical expertise; and to work independently. The thesis paper provides the student a formal means in which to articulate the aesthetic, historic, and critical contexts of his or her work as well as the scope and merits of the creative project. The exhibit, which is publicly presented in the Book Arts Gallery, provides the student with an opportunity to showcase both artistic and technical skills and to contextualize the body of work produced during the course of the program. A public defense with a slide presentation is also required.

LS
500
Hours
3
Organization Of Information

Required course introducing the principles of organizing bibliographies, library catalogs, and collections. Examines the content of bibliographic records in printed and machine-readable form, choice and form of access points, authority control, verbal and classified systems of subject access, and the impact of new technologies. An introduction to OCLC searching is included. The course objective is to enable the student to understand and use catalogs and bibliographies. Students interested in becoming catalogers should follow LS 500 with LS 506 Cataloging and Classification.

LS
501
Hours
3
Intro Library Info Study

Required course designed to provide the student with a broad background in library and information studies. Must be taken during the first 12 hours of a student's program. Through a variety of instructional methods, this course examines three interrelated themes: the nature of the library and information profession; issues of intellectual freedom and access to information; and the impact of technology upon society and the profession.

LS
502
Hours
3
Research Methods

Required course introducing research design and statistical techniques used in library, media, and information science. At the conclusion of the course, the student should be able to comprehend and utilize research reports in these fields and to design and carry out basic research projects.

LS
503
Hours
3
Systems Analysis

Investigation of the concepts of systems analysis; investigation and use of the techniques of systems analysis; and study of applications of systems analysis in library and information systems.

LS
504
Hours
3
Media Prod & Utilization

Instructional modules that introduce the student to basic skills in the preparation and utilization of educational media.

LS
505
Hours
3
Collection Development

Explores principles and issues involved in developing library collections. Aspects such as community analysis, policy development, selection and acquisitions, resource sharing, evaluation, weeding, and preservation are examined.

LS
506
Hours
3
Cataloging & Classifictn

Explores problems of descriptive cataloging of print and non-print materials; subject access using Library of Congress subject headings, LC classification, and Dewey decimal classification; OCLC searching, record modification, and inputting; and contemporary issues in bibliographic control.

LS
507
Hours
3
User Centered Information Services

Required course introducing printed and digital reference sources and reference services.

LS
508
Hours
3
Management Theory and Practice

Designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of modern management by studying the management aspects of authority, communications, decision making, delegation, leadership, personnel, planning, budgeting, and motivation. Use is made of case studies and simulations.

LS
509
Hours
1
Distance Learn Lib Info Stdy

An intensive course that provides an orientation to distance learning in the School of Library and Information Studies. Technical issues related to distance learning, resource issues such as access to library and electronic collections, and socialization to librarianship are addressed. Particular emphasis is on the online MLIS program in which the student has enrolled.

LS
510
Hours
3
Info Resrcs Humanities

Surveys and evaluates the major informational and bibliographical resources in literature, mythology, religion, philosophy, history, and the visual and performing arts. Stephens, Aversa.

LS
511
Hours
3
Info Resources Soc Sci

Surveys scholarly communication and the use of information in the social sciences. The use of reference sources in psychology, sociology, economics, anthropology and political science is taught.

LS
512
Hours
3
Info Resources:Science

Surveys scientific and technical communication, the bibliographic structure of science and technology, and information services for scientists and technologists. In-depth study of the major information sources in biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, engineering, and geology is included.

LS
514
Hours
3
Sources of Business Information

Surveys and evaluates the major informational and bibliographical resources in business librarianship.

LS
520
Hours
3
Early Childhood Literacy Materials & Story Programs

Introduces a wide variety of print and non-print early literacy materials for young children ages birth to seven with an emphasis on selecting materials and developing literature-based story programs to meet their educational, cultural, and recreational needs. Among the types of story programming techniques to be explored are storytelling, flannel boards, drama, puppetry, and finger rhymes. Emphasis will be placed on investigating the principals involved in designing, implementing, promoting and evaluating early literacy story programs for young children.

LS
521
Hours
3
Matl & Services Childrn

Explores materials (print and non-print) and programs appropriate for children ages 3 to 12.

LS
522
Hours
3
Matl Serv Young Adults

Explores materials (print and non-print) and programs appropriate for teenagers.

LS
523
Hours
3
Matl Services Adults

Examines services, programming, and popular materials provided to adult users of public libraries.

LS
524
Hours
3
Project Management

Introduces graduate level concepts and skills associated with project management in information rich environments. Includes teamwork, team development, and collaboration.

LS
527
Hours
3
Information Literacy Instruction

This course is intended to provide students with an introduction to the concepts, theories, and practice of library user instruction through reading, discussion, class speakers, and practice. The focus of the course will be on instruction for adult users in public and academic library settings.

Prerequisite(s): LS 501 and LS 507
LS
530
Hours
3
Public Libraries

Examination of public library development, purpose, governance, and services and exploration of issues and concepts involved in managing public libraries.

LS
531
Hours
3
Academic Libraries

Study of the role of library service in higher education.

LS
532
Hours
3
School Media Centers

Develops a philosophical and functional background of the school-media program as an integral part of the teaching-learning process.

LS
533
Hours
3
Spec Libr & Info Centrs

Philosophy, environment, and unique aspects of the services, operation, and management of special libraries and information centers are covered. Provides considerable opportunity for study of topics of interest to individual students.

LS
534
Hours
3
Medical Librarianship

Introduction to medical librarianship and the environment in which it operates. Orientation to the health care field, operation and administration of health sciences libraries, and basic information sources and services for the health sciences is included.

LS
535
Hours
3
Records Management

Introduces the fundamentals of information and records management. Content includes (a) inventory, scheduling and auditing records; (b) active and inactive information maintenance; (c) organizing and administering a records center; and (d) applications for information systems (computer, microform and paper).

LS
536
Hours
3
Archives

Survey of archival resources and special collections, with attention to their organization, administration, and service problems.

LS
538
Hours
3
Law Library Legal Resources

Introduces the concepts of law library management and the techniques and materials of legal research.

LS
541
Hours
3
Youth Programming

Explores various types of literacy programs and outreach services for youth (children, tweens, and teens) as well as the development and management of library environments that facilitate life-long learning and reading adventures.

LS
542
Hours
3
Instruct Design & Dev

Comprises a series of modules that cover the basic skills required to undertake instructional development. Materials needed to plan and prepare instruction, as well as exercises designed to upgrade interpersonal skills, are included. Designed for library-media specialists, supervisors, administrators, and others who assist teachers in the development of instruction.

LS
543
Hours
3
Traditional & Digital Storytelling

Introduces a wide variety of storytelling techniques both traditional and digital (technology-based) and explores how these strageties can be used in library programs and services for children and young adults. Emphasis is placed on developing personal storytelling skills via technology and traditional resources. A web-cam is required for this course.

LS
544
Hours
3
Cultural Diversity Programming

Explores the development and implementation of various types of library programs and outreach services for children and young adults that promote cultural diversity.

LS
555
Hours
3
Introduction to Archival Studies

Three hours. This course offers an introduction to archival theory and practice. Emphasis is placed on investigating the nature and character of archival forms, the role of the archivist in society, the ethics of archival practice, and the social function of records and archives. (formerly LS 536 Archives).

Prerequisite(s): This course has no pre-requisites.
LS
556
Hours
3
Intellectual Foundations of Archival Theory & Practice

Archives are made by ideas. Archivists have defined, and described, archives as functioning as memory, evidence, and information. In addition, archives have been ascribed cultural, historical, and artifactual values. This course is a critical examination of archival thought and its influence on how archives are conceived, constructed, and ultimately used.

Prerequisite(s): There are no prerequisites for this course.
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: There are no prerequisites for this course.
LS
557
Hours
3
Archival Appraisal

This course explores topics in the selection and appraisal of archival materials. In this course you will gain exposure to the principles and approaches, which influence how records are selected for long-term retention and preservation, as well as practical performing this archival practice.

Prerequisite(s): There are no prerequisites for this course.
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: There are no prerequisites for this course.
LS
558
Hours
3
Archival Representation, Access & Use

This course explores topics in the organization of archival materials. Specifically, the topics addressed include the description, arrangement, and representation of archival objects and collections. In studying these topics, students will obtain an understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of these practices as well as practical experience in creating usable collections through archival arrangement and description.

Prerequisite(s): The prerequisite for this course is LS 500 Organization of Information. Please contact the instructor if you have not fulfilled this requirement.
Prerequisite(s) with concurrency: The prerequisite for this course is LS 500 Organization of Information. Please contact the instructor if you have not fulfilled this requirement.
LS
560
Hours
3
Information Technologies

Required course. This course provides future information professionals with a solid foundation of basic information technologies at the skill, conceptual, and analytical levels. Acquaints students with the role of technology in information organizations. Students gain hands-on experience in web application production from a user-centered perspective, including: hypertext, usability analysis, database application, and technology instruction. Foundations of change management are addressed. IT Fluency is used as a model to explore the topics of this course.

LS
561
Hours
3
Fundament Info Science

Includes selected topics centered on the study of information needs, uses, and access. Covers methods for identifying the information needs of diverse populations, how people seek and use information, and methods for evaluating the effectiveness of traditional and computerized systems in helping people deal with their information-related problems. Explores the changing roles of traditional information sciences methods and tools (e.g. indexing, user studies, cognitive studies) in these matters.

LS
562
Hours
3
Digital Libraries

Prepares students to develop digital libraries, exploring the issues associated with creating, operating, and maintaining digital libraries; analyzing electronic library programs in the U.S. and assessing their impact on education, scholarship and research.

Prerequisite(s): LS 560
LS
564
Hours
3
Programming for Digital Libraries

The main focus of this course is to learn basic programming concepts and skills for managing different types of content and developing interactive systems. Java is the programming language used in this course to explore the development of digital libraries. We will start out at a beginner's level with Java, and students will gain understanding of basic programming syntax, data structures, and logic. Students will then learn how to develop applications for more applied tasks, including data parsing and processing, and extending specialized Java packages for implementing further functionality of system components found in digital libraries.

LS
566
Hours
3
Metadata

Surveys metadata issues in library and information environments and includes hands-on work with metadata schemas and digital libraries of networked resources.

Prerequisite(s): LS 500
LS
567
Hours
3
Digital Reference

Explores societal problems and professional developments that relate to digital reference services in public, academic and special libraries. Explores the impact of digital reference on users and libraries.

Prerequisite(s): LS 507
LS
569
Hours
3
Information Management

This course will survey information management tools and techniques applied for maintaining, processing, and disseminating digital information. Specific topics will include physical database structures, database design, database-driven web applications, user interface, and representation for retrieval. Course exercises cover fundamental techniques for data modeling, implementing and querying databases, and information visualization.

LS
570
Hours
1-3
Internship

Internship.

LS
572
Hours
3
Intern Sch Media Cntrs

Intern Sch Media Cntrs.

LS
580
Hours
3
Outreach to Diverse Populations

Explores diverse cultural groups and the ways that all types of libraries can effectively serve the informational and recreational needs of these populations.

LS
581
Hours
3
Universal Design for Information Technologies

Examines the place of information and communication technologies, online resources, and social networking tools in the current practice of information and communication interactions for persons with mild to severe physical access challenges.

Prerequisite(s): LS 560 - Information Technology
LS
582
Hours
3
Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Library & Information Studies

This course explores how race, gender, and sexuality shape (and are shaped by) LIS as a profession and practice. Socially constructed theories of race, gender and sexual identity will be critically examined in different contexts as they intersect, overlap and impact LIS institutions, information use, technology practices, and the design of information resources and services in the processes of creation, organization, and dissemination of information in library and information professions.

LS
583
Hours
3
Social Aspects of Information

This course covers a range of social, political, and economic issues related to how people interact with information and communication technologies. The class explores the effects of different social contexts on the creation, use, and meaning of information technologies. Subject matter will range from examining online interactions, mobile technologies, information and work, digital labor practices, and laws and policies related to information technologies.

LS
590
Hours
3
Issues In Librarianship

Explores societal problems and professional developments that have, or are likely to have, an impact on the practice of librarianship. May be taken more than once.

LS
598
Hours
1-6
Directed Research

Provides the opportunity for an intensive investigation of a special aspect of library and information studies, under the supervision of an appropriate faculty member.

LS
599
Hours
1-6
Thesis Research

Thesis Research. Maximum of 6 hours may be earned.